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Win a Clint Eastwood 40 Film Collection boxset

  • HeyUGuys
Author: Competitions

To mark the release of Clint Eastwood 40 Film Collection, out now, we’ve been given a copy of the boxset to give away on DVD.

For nearly 40 years, Clint Eastwood has called Warner Bros home. This essential collection contains the extraordinary films created during his partnership with the studio, where Eastwood opened Malpaso Productions in 1975. The deluxe boxset includes: Where Eagles Dare (1968), Kelly’s Heroes (1970), Dirty Harry (1971), Magnum Force (1973), The Enforcer (1976), The Outlaw Josey Wales (1976), The Gauntlet (1977), Every Which Way but Loose (1978), Bronco Billy (1980), Any Which Way You Can (1980), Honkytonk Man (1982), Firefox (1982), Sudden Impact (1983), City Heat (1984), Tightrope (1984), Pale Rider (1985), Heartbreak Ridge (1986), Bird (1988), The Dead Pool (1988), Pink Cadillac (1989), White Hunter, Black Heart (1990), The Rookie (1990), Unforgiven (1992), A Perfect World (1993), The Bridges of Madison County (1995), Absolute Power (1997), Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil (1997), True Crime (1999), Space Cowboys (2000), Blood Work (2002), Mystic River (2003), Flags of Our Fathers (2006), Letters from Iwo Jima
See full article at HeyUGuys »

Clint Eastwood Is Returning to Acting

  • MovieWeb
Clint Eastwood Is Returning to Acting
Clint Eastwood is one of those rare Hollywood stars who is a legend both in front of and behind the camera. While he's best known to most audiences as an actor, with decades of iconic performances, but he has also established himself as one of our finest filmmakers as well. In recent years, the multi-hyphenate has focused his energies more on filmmaking and less in acting, with his last on screen performance coming in his 2012 baseball movie entitled Trouble With the Curve, where he played an aging baseball scout. During an appearance at the Cannes Film Festival, the Hollywood icon suggested that he eventually will make his return to acting.

Variety attended a master class being put on by the actor-filmmaker at the Cannes Film Festival, where he discussed a variety of topics. The filmmaker stated that he does miss performing "once in a while but not often," while hinting
See full article at MovieWeb »

Clint Eastwood Promises to Return to Acting At Packed Cannes Masterclass

  • Indiewire
Clint Eastwood Promises to Return to Acting At Packed Cannes Masterclass
The toughest ticket at this year’s Cannes Film Festival? A masterclass with Clint Eastwood, which unfolded on Sunday afternoon to a packed auditorium and a crowd that warmly received the veteran actor and director with a three-minute standing ovation.

While the two-hour chat, led by Los Angeles Times film critic Kenneth Turan, surveyed the full scope of Eastwood’s career with a particular eye on his directorial efforts, Eastwood admitted the he missed acting in front of the camera and promised to return to it.

Read More: Cannes 2017 Unveils Official Schedule, Adds Masterclasses With Clint Eastwood and Alfonso Cuarón

Eastwood’s last major on-screen performance was in 2012’s “The Trouble With the Curve” (which, quite notably, came after a four-year acting hiatus). Per Variety’s report, he told Turan that he missed acting “once in a while but not often,” and added that he will return when he is ready.
See full article at Indiewire »

Cannes 2017 Unveils Official Schedule, Adds Masterclasses With Clint Eastwood and Alfonso Cuarón

  • Indiewire
Cannes 2017 Unveils Official Schedule, Adds Masterclasses With Clint Eastwood and Alfonso Cuarón
As is tradition, the Cannes Film Festival has unveiled its official schedule just days before the creme de la creme of festivals kicks off next week. Buried in an impressively stacked lineup are two brand new and delightfully unexpected additions: masterclasses with Clint Eastwood and Alfonso Cuarón, both listed as part of their Cannes Classics slate.

Eastwood’s class is slated for two hours on Sunday, May 21. The previous day, Cannes will screen Eastwood’s 1992 Western classic, “Unforgiven.” Eastwood is a long-time Cannes regular, screening films such as “Changeling,” “Pale Rider,” “Bird,” “Absolute Power,” and “Mystic River” at the festival over the years.

In 1994, he served as President of the Official Selection jury, which ultimately picked Quentin Tarantino’s “Pulp Fiction” as their Palme d’Or winner.

Read More: 17 Shocks and Surprises from the 2017 Cannes Lineup

On Wednesday, May 24, Cuarón will lead his own masterclass. The lauded Mexican filmmaker was
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Logan,’ ‘Deadpool’ and Why the World Is Ready for an R-Rated X-Men Film

‘Logan,’ ‘Deadpool’ and Why the World Is Ready for an R-Rated X-Men Film
Comic book movies aren’t just for kids.

Logan,” the blood-drenched final chapter in the Wolverine saga, demonstrates that superhero films don’t have to be sanitized to succeed. Like “Deadpool” before it, the blockbuster differentiated itself from the flood of films about costumed heroes by embracing a hard R-rating. It’s no accident that Fox produced both movies. The studio, which licenses the rights to X-Men characters like Wolverine and Deadpool, seems intent on carving out a niche for itself by making grittier, tougher comic book fare that’s in stark contrast to Disney’s sunnier “Avengers” series.

“Fox needs to be bold and continue to blaze this trail,” said Jeff Bock, an analyst with Exhibitor Relations. “I think the world is now ready for an R-rated X-Men film.”

Related

Box Office: ‘Logan’ Roars With Massive $85.3 Million Debut

So far, the strategy is working. “Logan” debuted to a massive
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Directors' Trademarks: Clint Eastwood

  • Cinelinx
Directors’ trademarks is a series of articles that examines the “signatures” that filmmakers leave behind in their work. This month, we’re examining the trademark style and calling signs of Clint Eastwood as director.

Clint Eastwood became an american film star in the 1960’s thanks to his acting performances in a number of western films. As he began to branch out with new roles in front of the camera, he sought out to have more creative input into the types of film projects that he would be involved in. One way he was able to accomplish this was by creating his own production company which eventually allowed him to work behind the camera as director. His first film as director was 1971’s Play Misty For Me, which was well received by critics and did well at the box office. HIs second film as director was High Plains Drifter (1973), in which he also starred.
See full article at Cinelinx »

Brimstone review – Dakota Fanning in blood-and-thunder western that pulls no punches

Four-part epic about a mute woman stalked by a vengeful preacher is filled with hellfire and damnation, but suffers from somewhat ponderous pace

Here is an epic western in the Pale Rider mould, shot in English by Dutch director Martin Koolhoven, who – on the evidence of this film at least – has an overweening interest in blood: pigs’ blood, menstrual blood, intestinal ooze and arterial gore seem to flow in rivers across the screen. (Significantly, it all leads to a queasy “blood of the virgin” moment late on, which indicates the smothering levels of Christian symbolism and allegory Koolhoven slathers all over the film.)

Right from the start, Koolhoven pulls no punches. Bedecked with a title suggesting hellfire, his film is divided into four chapters: Revelation, Exodus, Genesis and Retribution. Each tells a different stage in the life of Liz Brundy (Dakota Fanning): the first three chunks tell it in reverse order,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

10 years ago today: ‘Superman Returns’ soared into theaters

  • Hitfix
10 years ago today: ‘Superman Returns’ soared into theaters
10 years ago, Superman looked a lot different onscreen. Kevin Spacey, not Jesse Eisenberg, was playing Lex Luthor. Kate Bosworth, not Amy Adams, was in the role of Lois Lane. And unknown actor Brandon Routh was starring as the Man of Steel. In retrospect, Superman was headlining a rather bright, campy movie when you look at his 2006 flick next to this year’s grimdark Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice. Superman Returns opened in theaters 10 years ago today. It didn’t manage to reboot the long-stagnant Superman property into a new franchise, as Warner Bros. hoped. The Batman v Superman title was being tossed around already during discussion for a sequel to Superman Returns. But the studio ultimately decided to move on from the Routh-Bryan Singer-et al. line-up. “Superman [Returns] didn't quite work as a film in the way that we wanted it to,” then-wb president Jeff Robinov said in
See full article at Hitfix »

Making a Western in 31 Days: Jon Cassar on Forsaken

Director Jon Cassar breathes new life into the Western genre while honoring its traditions in Forsaken, a beautiful, haunting piece of work that will be released day and date on February 19. In a story reminiscent of Shane and Pale Rider, Kiefer Sutherland plays John Henry Clayton, a reformed gunslinger drawn back into action when he returns to his hometown and finds it under siege by an unscrupulous land grabber (Brian Cox). While sparring with Cox’s hired guns (led by Michael Wincott in a rich, thrillingly entertaining performance), Clayton also reconnects with an old love who has moved on (Demi […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

The Dressmaker review – Kate Winslet is zestful in uneven black comedy

Full-throttle performances enliven an otherwise all-over-the-place Australian small-town satire crossed with a revenge romp

Kate Winslet kicked off her big-screen career with an unforgettable role as a murderous teenager in Peter Jackson’s electrifying New Zealand drama Heavenly Creatures. Now in Jocelyn Moorhouse’s ramshackle black comedy (from Rosalie Ham’s novel), she plays an Australian woman returning to the remote home town from which she was removed as a child amid rumours of deadly playground deeds. The film opens as a western, with Winslet’s dressmaker Tilly Dunnage arriving in lonely Dungatar, a Pale Rider sheriff here to clean up this godforsaken town, armed only with a Singer sewing machine.

From here, it mutates into a small-town social satire replete with ostracised madwomen, libidinous dignitaries and cross-dressing cops, before downshifting via unexpected loss into a John Waters-style revenge romp, climaxing in weddings, funerals and theatrical Shakespearean wrath. Tonally,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Terrence Evans, Actor in ‘Star Trek,’ ‘Terminator 2,’ Dies at 81

Terrence Evans, Actor in ‘Star Trek,’ ‘Terminator 2,’ Dies at 81
Terrence Evans, who appeared in TV shows and movies including Clint Eastwood’s “Pale Rider” and “Terminator 2: Judgement Day,” died August 7 in Burbank at 81.

“Terrence was a consummate actor who was passionate about his art and about giving to others. He projected his strength and humanity into his character portrayals,” said his longtime manager Phil Brock of Studio Talent Group, who reported his death.

The tall, lanky actor had roles in both “Star Trek: Deep Space Nine” and “Star Trek: Voyager,” playing the mute farmhand Baltrim. Also on “Voyager,” he later played Proka Migdal, the adoptive father of a Cardassian boy, as well as playing Ambassador Treen. In “Terminator 2,” he played the tanker driver killed by the T-1000.

In the 2003 remake of “Texas Chainsaw Massacre” and in “The Texas Chainsaw Massacre: The Beginning,” he played Leatherface’s uncle Old Monty.

The actor appeared in numerous TV series, including “Hart to Hart,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Terrence Evans, Actor in ‘Star Trek,’ ‘Terminator 2,’ Dies at 81

Terrence Evans, Actor in ‘Star Trek,’ ‘Terminator 2,’ Dies at 81
Terrence Evans, who appeared in TV shows and movies including Clint Eastwood’s “Pale Rider” and “Terminator 2: Judgement Day,” died August 7 in Burbank at 81.

“Terrence was a consummate actor who was passionate about his art and about giving to others. He projected his strength and humanity into his character portrayals,” said his longtime manager Phil Brock of Studio Talent Group, who reported his death.

The tall, lanky actor had roles in both “Star Trek: Deep Space Nine” and “Star Trek: Voyager,” playing the mute farmhand Baltrim. Also on “Voyager,” he later played Proka Migdal, the adoptive father of a Cardassian boy, as well as playing Ambassador Treen. In “Terminator 2,” he played the tanker driver killed by the T-1000.

In the 2003 remake of “Texas Chainsaw Massacre” and in “The Texas Chainsaw Massacre: The Beginning,” he played Leatherface’s uncle Old Monty.

The actor appeared in numerous TV series, including “Hart to Hart,
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Drive-In Dust Offs: The Car

  • DailyDead
In the wake of the massive hit that was Jaws (1975), studios were foaming at the mouth to replicate its success. Of course, their idea was to take everything that they thought made Jaws a winner and put it in a different setting. Here’s a few that were cranked out by the dream machine: Jaws on Land (Grizzly), Micro-Jaws (Piranha), Jaws, Back to the Water (Orca), Jaws, Back to the Water Again, with Feeling (Jaws II) , and our flick du jour, the little engine that could, Jaws on Wheels – The Car (1977) .

In actuality, Steven Spielberg made Jaws on Wheels before he made Jaws, with the relentless cat and mousecapades of Duel (1971). However, this was 1977 and it was time for an upgrade. Released by Universal in May, The Car was (naturally) laughed off the screen by the critics, and why wouldn’t it be? A demonic vehicle terrorizing a
See full article at DailyDead »

Cinema Retro Presents: "The American Westerns Of Clint Eastwood" Special Issue

  • CinemaRetro
Cinema Retro proudly presents its latest "Movie Classics" special edition issue: "The American Westerns of Clint Eastwood", the perfect companion to our acclaimed special issue dedicated to the three Clint Eastwood Westerns directed by Sergio Leone.

"The American Westerns of Clint Eastwood" is a 116 page limited edition publication. Each of Eastwood's American Westerns is covered in detail in individual chapters:

"Hang "Em High" "Paint Your Wagon" "Two Mules for Sister Sara" "The Beguiled" "Joe Kidd" "High Plains Drifter" The Outlaw Josey Wales" "Pale Rider" "Unforgiven" Special section covering early film roles and TV Western appearances

Featuring hundreds of photographs, rare behind-the-scenes stills an movie poster art, including location photos (then and now) and even props that exist to this day in private collections!!

We are also very honored to present unseen movie poster designs by the legendary Bill Gold, who has overseen the advertising campaigns for most of Eastwood's films
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Nerd Alert: The Joker Vs Deadpool and Terminator Genisys Easter Eggs

  • MovieWeb
Nerd Alert: The Joker Vs Deadpool and Terminator Genisys Easter Eggs
Welcome to today's edition of Nerd Alert, where we have all the off-beat, nerdy news for you in one convenient spot. What do we have in store for you on this marvelous Monday? We have a comprehensive video breakdown of all the Easter Eggs in Terminator Genisys, an animated video that shows Sean Connery portraying Gandalf in The Lord of the Rings and The Simpsons gets an Akira mashup. If that wasn't enough, Shia Labeouf's intense motivational speech even gets the anime treatment. But first, we have the ultimate battle between The Joker and Harley Quinn as they square off against Deadpool and Domino. So, sit back, relax, and check out all that today's Nerd Alert has to offer.

Super Power Beat Down: Joker & Harley Quinn vs. Deadpool and Domino

The latest episode of Bat In the Sun's series Super Power Beat Down features characters from 2 of next year's highly-anticipated superhero movies,
See full article at MovieWeb »

The Burning review – plenty of blood, but very little meat

Impressive visuals and Leone-style showdowns are no substitute for character development in Pablo Fendrik’s jungle western

Writer-director Pablo Fendrik’s “Mesopotamic western” is heavy on atmosphere, light on plot – a revenge narrative with an eco-friendly twist. Gael García Bernal is Kaí, a Pale Rider (think Charles Bronson meets Mowgli) who emerges from the Argentinian jungle to save Alice Braga’s kidnapped Vania after machete-wielding mercenaries pillage her home. At one with nature (the “manimal” analogy is overworked), Kía helps Vania to turn the tables on these beasts, climaxing in a cod-Leone showdown replete with mission bell sound effects and Straw Dogs-style homemade mantraps.

While the visuals are arresting and the locations haunting, Fendrik’s portentous fable lacks much in the way of credible character development – a viny romance between Kaí and Vania seems more a strategic addition than an organic thread. Some crunchy action adds blood but not meat.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Richard Dysart, Emmy-Winning ‘L.A. Law’ Actor, Dies at 86

Richard Dysart, Emmy-Winning ‘L.A. Law’ Actor, Dies at 86
Richard Dysart, a stage and screen actor known best for his performance as Leland McKenzie in the NBC legal drama “L.A. Law,” died Sunday in his home in Santa Monica. He was 86.

Dysart was born in Boston and raised in Maine. In the 1950s, he got his start in radio and worked at New York’s off-Broadway Circle in the Square Theatre.

He was a founding member of the American Conservatory Theater in the 60s, and played roles on Broadway throughout his career in “All in Good Time,” “The Little Foxes” and “A Place Without Doors.” His performance in “That Championship Season” for his role of the Coach which he created won him a Drama Desk Award in 1972.

In “L.A. Law” Dysart played patriarchal law firm partner LeLand McKenzie. The series aired for eight seasons from 1986-1994. Dysart’s performance earned him a primetime Emmy in 1992.

Dysart’s film appearances
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Richard Dysart, Emmy-Winning ‘L.A. Law’ Actor, Dies at 86

Richard Dysart, Emmy-Winning ‘L.A. Law’ Actor, Dies at 86
Richard Dysart, a stage and screen actor known best for his performance as Leland McKenzie in the NBC legal drama “L.A. Law,” died Sunday in his home in Santa Monica. He was 86.

Dysart was born in Boston and raised in Maine. In the 1950s, he got his start in radio and worked at New York’s off-Broadway Circle in the Square Theatre.

He was a founding member of the American Conservatory Theater in the 60s, and played roles on Broadway throughout his career in “All in Good Time,” “The Little Foxes” and “A Place Without Doors.” His performance in “That Championship Season” for his role of the Coach which he created won him a Drama Desk Award in 1972.

In “L.A. Law” Dysart played patriarchal law firm partner LeLand McKenzie. The series aired for eight seasons from 1986-1994. Dysart’s performance earned him a primetime Emmy in 1992.

Dysart’s film appearances
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Sliff 2014 Review – The Dark Valley

The Dark Valley screens Friday November 21st at 9:00pm and Saturday November 22nd as part of the St. Louis International Film Festival. Both screenings are at The Plaza Frontenac Theater. Ticket information for the Friday show can be found Here.

Ticket information for the Saturday show can be found Here

Review by Dana Jung

It’s probably safe to say that a film genre with a fairly small resume’ is the German Western. Even in the heyday of “spaghetti” westerns in the 1960s and 70s there weren’t many horse operas originating from Germany. And although it utilizes many of the conventions of both classic and post-modern Western cinema, the new film The Dark Valley is a real treat for fans of Western movies looking for something different and memorable.

The Dark Valley begins with the arrival of Greider (Sam Riley) at a small village in the frozen “badlands” of the German-Austrian Alps.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

The Top Five Banshee Episodes (So Far)

  • TVovermind.com
Cinemax recently released a premiere date (January 9th!) and poster for Banshee‘s third season, which got us thinking about the show’s first two seasons – which then led to a heated debate of the show’s best episodes so far. For what its worth, here’s my two cents on the best episodes of Banshee’s first two seasons: “Behold a Pale Rider” (Season 1, Episode 7) “Behold a Pale Rider” is probably the weakest episode on this list on a plot level (psychos take over nearly-empty school gym, blah blah blah), but it deepens the show’s central relationship of season one (Ana and Lucas) in fascinating ways. Ana isn’t shown as a woman devoured by her own emotions (a welcome change on TV), but rather one who acts pragmatically, deciding to send Hood off to his death, rather than risk her lies and past being exposed to her
See full article at TVovermind.com »
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