Morons from Outer Space (1985) - News Poster

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Horror Highlights: I Kill Giants, Comet TV December Viewing Guide, Twin Peaks Fan Film, The Temple Of Lilith

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The renowned graphic novel from Joe Kelly and Ken Niimura comes to life in the feature film I Kill Giants, which has been acquired for Us distribution by Rlje Films. In today's Horror Highlights we also have a look at Comet TV's December viewing guide, the Indiegogo campaign for a Twin Peaks fan project, and we also enter the woods to watch the eerie short film The Temple of Lilith.

Rlje Films Acquires Us Distribution Rights to I Kill Giants: Press Release: "Los Angeles, Dec. 5, 2017 – Rlje Films, a brand of Rlj Entertainment (Nasdaq: Rlje), Umedia and Xyz Films announced today that Rlje has acquired the U.S. rights to the highly anticipated I Kill Giants, which premiered at the 2017 Toronto International Film Festival to critical praise. Based on the acclaimed Man of Action graphic novel by Joe Kelly and Ken Niimura with a screenplay by Joe Kelly, the film was directed by Anders Walter,
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Mel Smith remembered: 'A gentleman and a scholar, a gambler and a wit'

Griff Rhys Jones talks about his shock at the news of his former comedy partner's death from a heart attack at home

Mel Smith, the British comedian, writer, actor, producer and film director, known for his long and popular television partnership with Griff Rhys Jones, died on Friday at the age of 60. He suffered a heart attack at his London home.

Smith's deadpan style, along with his lugubrious manner and large build, quickly established him as one of the country's favourite television performers in the early 1980s.

Jones, his friend for 35 years, said he had lost "a gentleman and a scholar, a gambler and a wit" and that he was in a state of shock. "I still can't believe this has happened. To everybody who ever met him, Mel was a force for life. He had a relish for it that seemed utterly inexhaustible.

"He inspired love and utter loyalty
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

R.I.P. Mel Smith (1952 - 2013)

British comedy favourite Mel Smith passed away yesterday after suffering a heart attack aged 60, his agent has revealed via a statement. The comedian, actor, writer and director was best known for his work on the sketch shows Not the Nine O'Clock News and Alas Smith and Jones, which saw him starring alongside his long-time comedy partner Griff Rhys Jones. The duo also formed Talkback Productions in 1981, with the production company going to produce a number of popular British comedy shows, including I'm Alan Partridge, Smack the Pony, Da Ali G Show and Never Mind the Buzzcocks.

As well as appearing in several movies including Morons from Outer Space (which co-wrote with Jones) and The Princess Bride, Smith also directed several films, beginning in 1989 with his feature film debut, the romantic comedy The Tall Guy, penned by Not the Nine O'Clock News writer Richard Curtis; the pair would reunite with another
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Mel Smith: 1952-2013

News Den Of Geek 20 Jul 2013 - 14:44

The writer, actor and director Mel Smith has died at the age of 60.

Some really sad news to report. The actor, writer and director Mel Smith has died, at the age of 60. The news has now been officially confirmed by the BBC. A heart attack is believed to be the cause of his death.

Smith sprung to fame in the groundbreaking and hugely influential Not The Nine O'Clock News, and then he joined up with Griff Rhys-Jones for a long running and fruitful partnership, the highlight of which being Alas Smith And Jones. The pair's monologues were so popular, they even become part and parcel of the annual build up to the F.A. Cup Final. They also joined together for the movie of Tom Sharpe's Wilt.

Smith co-wrote and starred in the movie Morons From Outer Space too, and he made
See full article at Den of Geek »

10 alternate interpretations of Mac And Me

A shameless clone of E.T., or a nuanced film layered with meaning? Ryan offers a few alternate interpretations of Mac And Me

One of the most infamous cinematic clones in history, family sci-fi fantasy Mac And Me was met with critical derision for its numerous similarities to Steven Spielberg’s E.T.: The Extra-Terrestrial. On its release in 1988, a Washington Post review put it like this: “Forget about calling home; E.T., call lawyer.”

Mac And Me is equally notable for its blatant instances of product placement, with cans of Coca-Cola present in what appears to be every scene, and the titular alien, Mac, subsisting exclusively on Coke and packets of Skittles. There’s also an interminably long breakdancing sequence in a McDonald’s restaurant, and the spectre of the golden arches looms large over the entire film.

Add in some decidedly rubbery creature effects and some stilted acting, and it’s
See full article at Den of Geek »

Ricky Gervais - Directing is no joke

The film industry is littered with TV comics who have tried and failed to make it on the big screen. Remember Gladiatress, the 2004 comedy set in Celtic Britain during the Roman invasion and starring the Smack the Pony gang? No? Neither do I. What about Morons from Outer Space, written by and starring Mel Smith and Griff Rhys Jones? Or the deeply disappointing Magicians, featuring the Peep Show boys David Mitchell and Robert Webb? All were consigned to the comedy graveyard, a place where comics dreaming of film careers are left dead and buried.
See full article at The Independent »

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