7.3/10
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53 user 11 critic

Death of a Salesman (1985)

PG | | Drama | TV Movie 16 August 1985
An aging traveling salesman recognizes the emptiness of his life and tries to fix it.

Director:

(as Volker Schlondorff)

Writers:

(teleplay), (play)
Reviews
Popularity
1,167 ( 2,048)

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ON DISC
Won 1 Golden Globe. Another 6 wins & 11 nominations. See more awards »
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Cast

Complete credited cast:
...
...
...
...
...
Charley
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David S. Chandler ...
Bernard
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Howard Wagner
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Woman from Boston (as Kathy Rossetter)
Tom Signorelli ...
Stanley
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Miss Forsythe
Karen Needle ...
Letta
Anne McIntosh ...
Jenny
...
Waiter
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Storyline

Salesman Willy Loman is in a crisis. He's about to lose his job, he can't pay his bills, and his sons Biff and Happy don't respect him and can't seem to live up to their potential. He wonders what went wrong and how he can make things up to his family. Written by Eric Sorensen

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Its passion cannot be overstated. Its power must not be overlooked.

Genres:

Drama

Certificate:

PG | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

16 August 1985 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Dood van een handelsreiziger  »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

4:3
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Adapted from the 1984 Broadway production directed by Michael Rudman starring Dustin Hoffman. The original production had been staged in 1949 by Elia Kazan. See more »

Goofs

When Willy sits on the chair 120 minutes into the movie, Biff throws himself down at his feet and clutches his shirt. In one shot, Biff has his left arm on Willy's right shoulder outside his arm, in the next shot, he has his arm on Willy's right shoulder inside his arm, in the next shot he has it outside his arm again. See more »

Quotes

Harold 'Happy' Loman: I'm gettin' married, Pop.
Linda Loman: [wearily] Go to sleep, dear.
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Connections

Referenced in The Directors: The Films of Barry Levinson (2000) See more »

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User Reviews

 
filled with enough strengths to mostly overpower any complaints
29 October 2005 | by See all my reviews

Volker Schlondorff's adaptation of Arthur Miller's bed-rock of an American tragedy, Death of a Salesman, is one of the best made-for-TV movies of the 80's (odd how it never got a theatrical release though). It gives the star power of Dustin Hoffman in the iconic role of Willy Loman, and for a great theater actor-turned-screen star (though mostly low-key through his career), John Malkovich, and some fine character acting as well. If you've read the play, you might envision something else entirely, and if you've seen it on stage it might bring more disappointment. It is the sort of play you end up going through whether you want to or not in English class(es), particularly in college. It is an important film to see/play to read when you're around this age bracket, as the struggles of Willy and Biff collide alongside each other, and some kind of catharsis needs to come for both- one who's life has almost gone up in smoke, and one who needs to figure it out.

It's not worth talking about much of the actual plot or story of the film/play, although it is of note that one of the very best (or at least most effective) scenes for me comes when Willy visits Howard at the office. This exchange, and the drama that unfolds, is a truly heart-breaking little moment, among some others in the film, where you see a collision of "old-school" salesmanship and the always now recycling form of BS that goes with the salesman/business world. Really, what's worth talking about is the acting, and certain things with the style, for if you are wanting to check out the film before (or after) seeing the play, it's worth it to know what you'll be in for. In short, Hoffman is quite powerful and true in the film, though in ways that aren't really expectable.

An image from reading the play of Willy (that he might be bigger than life, though perhaps little in the mind, and out of shape) might go against a low-energy actor like Hoffman. But somehow, it seems to work, because there's heart and fire in the performance. Same goes for Malkovich, though on a different level. Their scenes together, or on their own, are like watching pro boxers have a go at each other, old timer versus a new champ; there is one other scene, when Biff catches Willy in the hotel room with his 'lady friend' that is likely one of the best scenes either actor has ever done (even if it's questionable if overall the performances are among their best).

As far as stylistics go, Schlondorff usually does the right thing: let these actors have their way around, and just try to film it without too much getting in the way. He does this, and at the same time is clever with certain camera sweeps and timing in the narrative (Miller's play was one of the first to jump around, like a novel or even a some films). The music by Alex North is one of my least favorite aspects to th film, as it chimes in some emotional cues that aren't right at all (though when it gets to the jazzy 40's style music then it's not bad). This version of Death of a Salesman is definitely recommended by me, but it may not be the absolute definitive version for some.


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