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Death Wish 3 (1985) Poster

(1985)

Trivia

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Charles Bronson uses a Wildey .475 Magnum hand cannon in this movie. It was his personal handgun in real life, and he suggested it as a means to make the film unique. In a 2005 interview in 'American Handgunner' magazine with Wildey Moore, the gun's creator and a technical consultant to the production, Moore said that sales for the weapon increase each time this film is aired on cable television. Moore said: "To this day there is a spike in Wildey Magnum sales every time 'Death Wish 3' appears on cable TV."
According to the book 'Bronson's Loose' by Paul Talbot, the original working title "Death Wish III" was changed to "Death Wish 3" because the Cannon Group conducted a survey and found that nearly half of the U.S. population could not read Roman numerals.
Apart from some establishing shots of New York at the beginning, the film was mostly shot in London, England with the old Lambeth Hospital being used as the police station and jail.
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This was the first 'Death Wish' movie to be made after the Bernard Goetz vigilante shootings in New York. After this, Charles Bronson publicly stated that he recommended that people not imitate his character Paul Kersey from the 'Death Wish' movies.
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As principal photography was mostly filmed in London, the movie featured extras and background artists playing a variety of characters including police officers and gang members. Their audible dialogue, however, was in the British accent. This movie was set in New York and required American accents. As such, during post-production, director Michael Winner enlisted the assistance of the military personnel of the US Air Force stationed in England to dub over these UK accents.
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Originally rated "X" by the MPAA, the rating was lowered to "R" upon appeal.
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Charles Bronson was about sixty-three years of age when he appeared in this movie.
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Charles Bronson rarely granted interviews, or commented on his own films. However, he plainly stated his unhappiness with this film at least a few times, and was especially angered when he discovered that the director filmed extremely gory shots with extras (as nameless thugs) when he was off-set.
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Final 'Death Wish' movie that Charles Bronson made with director Michael Winner. The two had previously collaborated on both the original Death Wish (1974) film and its first sequel Death Wish II (1982). This movie was also the sixth and final movie that Bronson made with Winner. Prior to this film, they had made Chato's Land (1972), The Mechanic (1972) and The Stone Killer (1973) as well as the two above-mentioned earlier 'Death Wish' movies.
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After Death Wish II (1982)'s setting was transposed from New York in the original Death Wish (1974) movie to Los Angeles, this next sequel returns the setting to New York, though ironically, most of this picture was filmed in England.
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This sequel is notable in the 'Death Wish' movie series for having the biggest and most explosive finale of the five films.
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Oddly enough, two ideas from the original novel Death Wish actually made it into this sequel; the vigilante rents a car to use as bait for street thugs, and a giggling Puerto Rican male appears. According to the book 'Bronson's Loose' by Paul Talbot, a movie novelization of Death Wish 3 (1985) was announced, but was never published when it was pointed out that 'Brian Garfield' retains the literary rights to the series, and he refused to allow a movie novelization.
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Final 'Death Wish' movie to not have a subtitle as part of its film title. Both the next two sequels included title subtitles: Death Wish 4: The Crackdown (1987) and Death Wish V: The Face of Death (1994). An intended but unfilmed sixth movie was also to have a subtitle: 'Death Wish 6: The New Vigilante'.
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A variety of weapons were seen in this movie's grand action finale. They included a German Second World War MG-42; a Wildey .475 caliber handgun; a Browning .30 caliber machine-gun; a .38 caliber snub-nose revolver and an anti-tank rocket launcher.
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In 1987 a video-game tie-in of this movie was made on the ZX Spectrum 48K/128K platform.
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This movie is mentioned in the They Might Be Giants song "Anaheim". The lyrics say: "I don't want to stay in tonight and watch 'Death Wish 3'".
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Screenwriter Don Jakoby had his name removed from the movie in favor of pseudonym "Michael Edmonds". However, Jakoby's name and writer credit remained on the trailer, which is included on the MGM Region 1 DVD.
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Stuntman Rocky Taylor was very badly injured when a stunt went wrong.
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Charles Bronson and Ed Lauter, who appear together here, were both previously associated with the Magnificent Seven franchise. Bronson appeared in The Magnificent Seven (1960), while Lauter appeared in The Magnificent Seven Ride! (1972). However, they never appeared together in a Magnificent Seven movie.
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According to to trade paper 'Variety', this movie's theatrical "release was timed to capitalize on the controversy around subway vigilante Bernard Goetz."
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Second 'Death Wish' movie that was made during the 1980s. The others were Death Wish II (1982) and Death Wish 4: The Crackdown (1987).
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This movie was Charles Bronson's fourth picture to feature the word 'Death' in the title. Death Hunt (1981) and Messenger of Death (1988) were others. Bronson made seven movies with this word in the title, five of them being in the 'Death Wish' series. The final time would be in Death Wish V: The Face of Death (1994), where the word appeared twice.
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This Charles Bronson movie was released between between his pictures The Evil That Men Do (1984) and Murphy's Law (1986).
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The screenplay for this movie was written by Don Jakoby under the pseudonym Michael Edmonds.
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Final 'Death Wish' movie that was directed by Michael Winner. Winner directed both the original Death Wish (1974) film and its first sequel Death Wish II (1982).
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In Bennett's apartment, pictures of Hall of Fame baseball players Roger Peckinpaugh and former Yankees great Babe Ruth can be seen hanging on his wall.
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Some parts of the soundtrack from Death Wish II (1982) (composed by Jimmy Page) are re-used in this film.
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Cameo 

Alex Winter:  As Hermosa, a punk. This was Winter's second film.
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Spoilers 

The trivia item below may give away important plot points.

Body Count: 83.
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Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

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