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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2004 | 2002

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‘Thoroughbreds’ Trailer: Good Breeding Goes Bad in One of Anton Yelchin’s Last Performances — Watch

11 October 2017 9:09 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

When playwrights make the jump to screenwriting, we get films like Kenneth Lonergan’s “You Can Count on Me,” Martin McDonagh’s “In Bruges,” and Tom Stoppard’s “Brazil.” Joining their ranks is Cory Finley, a New York-based playwright who wrote the script for his directorial debut, “Thoroughbreds,” based on his play of the same name. The film electrified Sundance audiences when it premiered in early 2017, when Focus Features snatched it up for $5m in one of the festival’s first deals. Finley’s skill with dramatic writing is apparent in the first official teaser for the film, which looks like a grown-up version of “Heathers” for 2017.

Thoroughbreds” stars Anton Yelchin in one of his last performances before the actor’s tragic death, as well as Anya Taylor-Joy (“The Witch”) and Olivia Cooke (“Bates Motel”). In the only full scene show in the teaser, the two young women approach Yelchin »

- Jude Dry

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Flickering Myth Film Class: How to Open Strongly

8 October 2017 8:03 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

In the latest instalment of Flickering Myth’s film class, Tom Jolliffe looks at how to open strongly…

It takes a great deal to get an audience to succumb to your film. You need to keep their attention for the entirety of the film. The best way to hook them in of course is to open strong.

Whether an action film, horror, or any other genre, setting the tone for your film is essential. Even if you know you’re going to flip things up and surprise. If you begin with subversion, then the audience can expect something a little unexpected. Of course whether they get that is down to the skill in translating a strong opening and making it last through until a strong finale. There are countless examples of films opening fantastically only fall away pretty quickly. For a recent example just look at Spectre. Fantastic opening. Whilst »

- Tom Jolliffe

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Jonathan Pryce to star as Pope Francis in Netflix’s The Pope

7 September 2017 1:01 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Netflix has acquired a new feature film along with some star talent. Deadline has revealed that Jonathan Pryce has been cast as the current Pope Francis in the feature film The Pope. The film will be directed by City of God’s Fernando Meirelles from a script by Anthony McCarten, who will adapt the script from his stage play.

Pryce will star alongside Westworld’s Anthony Hopkins, who will play Pope Francis’ predecessor Pope Benedict XVI. The Pope will tell the story of Pope Benedict’s election and his resignation from the papacy nearly a decade later. This allowed Jorge Mario Bergoglio to become elected as the first Jesuit pope, the first from the Americas and the first Pope from outside Europe since the 8th Century. The film will show Pope Francis’ reluctance to take the position in 2013. Since becoming the Pope, his humility and devotion to the poor and »

- Ricky Church

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The Furniture: Brazil's Pungent Pot of Duct Soup

4 September 2017 8:42 AM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

"The Furniture," by Daniel Walber, is our weekly series on Production Design. You can click on the images to see them in magnified detail.

Hi there! I want to talk to you about ducts.

I mean that quite seriously, though I’m also quoting the opening lines of Terry Gilliam’s wacky and wonderful Brazil. It’s a film with a lot of unique production design, for which art director Norman Garwood and set decorator Maggie Gray received an Oscar nomination. They lost to Out of Africa, but I find it helpful to pretend that didn’t happen.

It’s nearly impossible to choose a single element to feature. I’ve half a mind to simply post all of the bleakly hilarious propaganda posters that clutter the walls of the film’s dystopian metropolis. Another option would be the design of the dream sequences, which become increasingly majestic as Sam Lowry »

- Daniel Walber

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Review: Young Morrissey Biopic ‘England is Mine’ Leaves Us Asking, Little Man, What Now?

25 August 2017 5:13 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Throughout the decades, Morrissey has remained one of the most private celebrities in show business. The way he guards his private life is almost the exact opposite of the manner in which he pours his heart out in his songs, which cover themes like existential crises, anti-monarchy sentiment and politics. Even his most fervent fans, who call him Moz, know little about him beyond the fact that he’s a vegan and has remained mostly celibate throughout his adult life, at one point even declaring “I hate sex.” If one were to believe anything in Mark Gill’s debut feature England is Mine, which focuses on six years in Morrissey’s youth, is that the reason why he is so private, other than his right to do so, is because his life is extremely dull.

Jack Lowden stars as Steven Patrick Morrissey, a 17-year-old living in Manchester with his Irish family. »

- Jose Solís

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Game of Thrones: Of Course You Know Who Plays Archmaester Marwyn!

17 July 2017 1:55 PM, PDT | POPSUGAR | See recent BuzzSugar news »

Game of Thrones added a new face to its already very large cast of characters with Sunday's season seven premiere. At the Citadel, Samwell Tarly is training to be a maester, learning at the hand of Archmaester Marwyn, played by award-winning star of stage and screen Jim Broadbent. Broadbent got his start over 40 years ago, but his first big role came in the 1985 sci-fi classic Brazil, where he played plastic surgeon to Katherine Helmond's vain Mrs. Ida Lowry in the fictional dystopian urban setting. The 68-year-old actor would go on to appear in some of the biggest films of the 1990s, including Enchanted April, The Crying Game, and Bullets Over Broadway, before his critically acclaimed turn as W.S. Gilbert (of the famed musical theater pair Gilbert and Sullivan) in Topsy-Turvy, a role that earned Broadbent a BAFTA nomination. On the heels of Topsy-Turvy, Broadbent had a big year in »

- Andrea Reiher

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Why Working Title’s Tim Bevan and Eric Fellner Are the Best Indie Producers in the World Right Now

10 July 2017 9:36 AM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

Welcome to Career Watch, a vocational checkup of top actors and directors, and those who hope to get there. In this edition we take on Working Title producers Tim Bevan and Eric Fellner, whose latest hit is Edgar Wright’s wheel-and-disc-spinning breakout “Baby Driver” (June 28, Sony), which has tracked $64 million worldwide to date.

Bottom Line: This brainy duo with plummy British accents have been turning out a consistent slate of smart global hits since the ’80s. The London-based co-chairmen of Working Title boast the best taste in the business. They chase mainstream quality fare. That’s their gig. But even so over the years, partnering with Universal Pictures, with freedom to greenlight movies up to $35 million, their films have grossed an impressive almost $7 billion dollars worldwide.

Career Peaks: From the start, Working Title founder Tim Bevan gravitated to local stories with global potential like “My Beautiful Laundrette,” Stephen Frears’ searing »

- Anne Thompson

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Why Working Title’s Tim Bevan and Eric Fellner Are the Best Indie Producers in the World Right Now

10 July 2017 9:36 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Welcome to Career Watch, a vocational checkup of top actors and directors, and those who hope to get there. In this edition we take on Working Title producers Tim Bevan and Eric Fellner, whose latest hit is Edgar Wright’s wheel-and-disc-spinning breakout “Baby Driver” (June 28, Sony), which has tracked $64 million worldwide to date.

Bottom Line: This brainy duo with plummy British accents have been turning out a consistent slate of smart global hits since the ’80s. The London-based co-chairmen of Working Title boast the best taste in the business. They chase mainstream quality fare. That’s their gig. But even so over the years, partnering with Universal Pictures, with freedom to greenlight movies up to $35 million, their films have grossed an impressive almost $7 billion dollars worldwide.

Career Peaks: From the start, Working Title founder Tim Bevan gravitated to local stories with global potential like “My Beautiful Laundrette,” Stephen Frears’ searing »

- Anne Thompson

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Tomorrow’s World: Part 1 – Why Terry Gilliam’s Brazil represents our near future

10 June 2017 4:30 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Tom Jolliffe on Terry Gilliam’s Brazil

Over the next week I will be looking at a selection of prescient films (and TV) which represent a cutting depiction of not only our present, but our near future. To start the ball rolling here, I consider Terry Gilliam’s masterpiece, Brazil. A look into a bleak, totalitarian future, filled with bureaucracy. Then next week in part 2, a breakdown of the societal and technological changes predicted in modern Science fiction such as Ex Machina, Black Mirror and more.

The beauty of Science Fiction is that it has the ability to tell a story that relates to the current world, but which can be set in a future of limitless possibilities. Until you reach 2015 and realise self drying clothes, flying cars and hover boards aren’t yet available, there’s no one to tell you, you’re wrong. Writers have been doing it for years. »

- Amie Cranswick

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Terry Gilliam Defies the Universe, Finishes Filming His ‘Don Quixote’ Movie

5 June 2017 3:30 PM, PDT | Slash Film | See recent Slash Film news »

Terry Gilliam is one of the most unique talents in the history of cinema…but he is also one of the most unlucky. The director of Brazil, Time Bandits, The Fisher King, and 12 Monkeys may be a visionary director with a few bonafide masterpieces under his belt, but it definitely feels like some kind of higher power has […]

The post Terry Gilliam Defies the Universe, Finishes Filming His ‘Don Quixote’ Movie appeared first on /Film. »

- Jacob Hall

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Terry Gilliam Wraps On The Man Who Killed Don Quixote

5 June 2017 10:45 AM, PDT | www.themoviebit.com | See recent TheMovieBit news »

Way, way back in 1998, Brazil and Twelve Monkeys director Terry Gilliam embarked on making The Man Who Killed Don Quixote, a very Gilliam-esque take on Miguel de Cervantes’ 16th century novel Don Quixote. With the original novel concerning an insane Spanish nobleman thinking himself to be a knight bringing back chivalry and justice to the world, Gilliam’s vision saw Johnny Depp as a 21st century marketing executive thrown back in time, and being mistaken for Quixote’s sire, Sancho Panza. Production began in September of 2000, quickly becoming one of the most disastrous shoots of all time. As chronicled in the documentary Lost in La Mancha, weather problems, nervous investors, and even the Spanish military added to the movie’s production woes. The final nail in the coffin came when Dox Quixote himself, Jean Rochefort, was diagnosed with a double herniated disc after attempting to act while riding a horse, »

- noreply@blogger.com (Tom White)

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Terry Gilliam’s ‘Don Quixote’ Shoot Wraps After 17 Years and Multiple Setbacks

5 June 2017 6:26 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

After almost 20 years of pre-production, principal photography has wrapped on Terry Gilliam’s “The Man Who Killed Don Quixote.”

The shoot for the Don Quixote-inspired feature took place in Spain and Portugal. Gilliam teamed with Tony Grisoni on the screenplay, reuniting the pair who worked together on “Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas,” among other titles.

The Man Who Killed Don Quixote” has been notoriously plagued by problems ranging from on-set disasters (including a flash flood) to production and funding issues. Speaking to Variety at last year’s Cannes Film Festival, Gilliam said: “I want to get this film out of my life so I can get on with the rest of my life.”

The former Monty Python member has been working on the project since 1989, persevering through setbacks so numerous that they inspired a documentary about the ill-starred project, 2002’s “Lost in La Mancha.”

“Don Quixote is a dreamer, »

- Stewart Clarke

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Terry Gilliam’s 17 year passion project, The Man Who Killed Don Quixote, finally wraps filming

5 June 2017 4:06 AM, PDT | HeyUGuys.co.uk | See recent HeyUGuys news »

Author: Zehra Phelan

Terry Gilliam’s 17-year passion project, The Man Who Killed Don Quixote starring Adam Driver and Jonathan Pryce has finally wrapped principal photography in Madrid.

A tale of fantasy and adventure inspired by the legendary protagonist of Miguel De Cervantes’ literary classic Don Quixote, The Man Who Killed Don Quixote tells the story of a deluded old man who is convinced he is Don Quixote, and who mistakes Toby, an advertising executive, for his trusty squire, Sancho Panza. The pair embarks on a bizarre journey, jumping back and forth in time between the 21st and magical 17th century. Gradually, like the infamous knight himself, Toby becomes consumed by the illusory world and unable to determine his dreams from reality. The tale culminates in a phantasmagorical and emotional finale where Toby takes on the mantle of Don Quixote de la Mancha.

Writer/ director Terry Gilliam, who has been »

- Zehra Phelan

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NYC Weekend Watch: ‘Beau Travail,’ Lubitsch, Varda, Spielberg Summer & More

2 June 2017 10:09 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Since any New York City cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

Metrograph

The Marlene Dietrich retrospective continues, while a series of contemporary French classics begins running.

Miracle Mile and The Spirit of the Beehive also screen.

Film Forum

One of the greatest filmmakers, comedy or otherwise, is put center stage in “The Lubitsch Touch.”

Léon Morin, Priest continues playing, while The Bad News Bears screens on Sunday. »

- Nick Newman

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‘Citizen Jane: Battle for the City’ Director Matt Tyrnauer on Urban Planning, Syd Mead, and More

19 May 2017 4:49 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Debuting at the Toronto International Film Festival in 2016, Matt Tyrnauer‘s Citizen Jane: Battle for the City has received rave reviews across the country as it opened in limited release last month. Centering on Jane Jacobs — a journalist, author, and activist — the film showcases the problems inherent to how urban planners in the mid-twentieth century worked.

One of the key proponents of this movement to teardown what he deemed “slums” for new, mammoth housing projects of concrete erasing the very communities they sought to “save” was New York’s Robert Moses. His power and reputation allowed him to force his ideas through the legislature for decades until Jacobs caught wind professionally and personally (he would eventually target her neighborhood). She ignited to take a stand and share her own beliefs in writing and via protest on city living, safety via “eyes on the street,” and the notion that cities are defined by its people, »

- Jared Mobarak

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First film from Martin Scorsese fund for emerging directors to launch at Cannes

12 May 2017 2:56 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Exclusive: Scorsese’s producing partner Emma Tillinger Koskoff talks to Screen about the venture.

The first project from Martin Scorsese’s as-yet-unnamed fund to help emerging filmmakers will be unveiled at the Cannes Film Festival (17-28 May).

The Cannes Director’s Fortnight entry A Ciambra by Jonas Carpignano is the first film to be produced under the fund, which is a partnership between Scorsese and Emma Tillinger Koskoff’s Sikelia Productions and Rodrigo Teixeira’s Brazil-based Rt Features.

The idea was first floated in 2013, with the fund launching in 2014. It has taken until now for the first film to come to fruition.

For the first time filmmakers will be able to submit projects for consideration by the fund, taking it beyond the scouting network.

Development process

Sikelia president of production Koskoff spoke to Screen about the venture at the Nettia Off Camera Film Festival in Krakow, where she was on the main feature film competition jury.

She »

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Martin Scorsese fund for emerging directors to launch at Cannes

12 May 2017 2:56 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Exclusive: The director is scouting for projects from first and second-time directors.

Martin Scorsese’s as-yet-unnamed fund to help emerging filmmakers will be unveiled at the Cannes Film Festival (17-28 May).

The Cannes Director’s Fortnight entry A Ciambra by Jonas Carpignano is the first film to be produced under the fund, which is a partnership between Scorsese and Emma Tillinger Koskoff’s Sikelia Productions and Brazil-based Rt Features.

The fund will have an official launch at Cannes to coincide with the screening of A Ciambra.

An idea first floated between the companies in 2014, it has taken three years for the fund to come to fruition, as a model for choosing projects and a submissions process has been devised.

For the first time filmmakers will be able to submit projects for consideration by the fund, taking it beyond the scouting network.

Development process

Sikelia president of production Koskoff spoke to Screen about the venture at the »

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Film and TV shows that would have been very different if people had just done their jobs properly

12 April 2017 4:38 PM, PDT | The Hollywood News | See recent The Hollywood News news »

The storylines of some of our favourite films and TV shows have been centred on the imprudent use of a contract, the loss of a letter, tampering with documentation and even something as simple as a typo.

But what if the characters had followed correct protocol and protected their sensitive information? Well, firstly, the shows wouldn’t have been as entertaining and secondly, they would have ended a lot differently. Albeit abruptly.

*Spoiler Alert* – we run down some of the best examples of file and contract mismanagement and what the film or TV shows would have been like if that fateful event had never happened?

TV Shows Better Call Saul

Better Call Saul is the spin-off TV series from Breaking Bad creators Vince Gilligan and Peter Gould. The show focuses on criminal lawyer, Saul Goodman’s life before the Breaking Bad show begins, whilst Saul is still known by his real name, »

- The Hollywood News

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John Cleese To Woo ‘Edith’ In BBC Sitcom; Cannes Sets Short Films – Global Briefs

12 April 2017 2:24 AM, PDT | Deadline TV | See recent Deadline TV news »

John Cleese is returning to a BBC sitcom for the first time since Fawlty Towers — after having previously lobbed criticism at the broadcaster. But, he says, the scripts for six-part comedy Edith are “the most enjoyable” he’s been sent “in the last 100 years." Written by Charles McKeown (Brazil) and produced by BBC Studios for BBC One, Edith also stars Alison Steadman (Gavin & Stacey) and Jason Watkins (Line Of Duty). The story centers on Edith (Steadman) who’s been a… »

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John Cleese To Woo ‘Edith’ In BBC Sitcom; Cannes Sets Short Films – Global Briefs

12 April 2017 2:24 AM, PDT | Deadline | See recent Deadline news »

John Cleese is returning to a BBC sitcom for the first time since Fawlty Towers — after having previously lobbed criticism at the broadcaster. But, he says, the scripts for six-part comedy Edith are “the most enjoyable” he’s been sent “in the last 100 years." Written by Charles McKeown (Brazil) and produced by BBC Studios for BBC One, Edith also stars Alison Steadman (Gavin & Stacey) and Jason Watkins (Line Of Duty). The story centers on Edith (Steadman) who’s been a… »

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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2004 | 2002

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