Mystery/suspense series based on Robert Parker's "Spenser" novels. Spenser, a private investigator living in Boston, gets involved in a new murder mystery each episode.

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3,149 ( 269)

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3   2   1  
1988   1987   1986   1985  
1 win. See more awards »
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Cast

Complete series cast summary:
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 Spenser (65 episodes, 1985-1988)
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 Hawk (65 episodes, 1985-1988)
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 Sgt. Frank Belson (65 episodes, 1985-1988)
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 Lt. Martin Quirk (47 episodes, 1985-1987)
Barbara Stock ...
 Susan Silverman (43 episodes, 1985-1988)
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 A.D.A. Rita Fiore (22 episodes, 1986-1987)

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Storyline

Mystery/suspense series based on Robert Parker's "Spenser" novels. Spenser, a private investigator living in Boston, gets involved in a new murder mystery each episode. Using his years of experience, his natural talents for observation and reasoning, and the occasional bit of help from his friend Hawk, Spenser never fails to crack the case. Written by Jean-Marc Rocher <rocher@fiberbit.net>

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Genres:

Crime | Drama

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Release Date:

20 September 1985 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Spenser  »

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| (pilot)

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1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The firehouse Spenser lives in during the first season was also used in What's the Worst That Could Happen? (2001) and the Boston portion of Real World (1992). See more »

Goofs

The character played by Carolyn McCormick is spelled "Rita Fiori" in the opening credits of season 2 but spelled "Rita Fiore" on a desk nameplate in various episodes. See more »

Connections

Followed by Thin Air (2000) See more »

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User Reviews

A TV rarity: an ensemble that takes you to their universe for intelligent crime adventure.
30 June 1999 | by (Central Coast, California) – See all my reviews

How to wrap up in summation thoughts and feelings for what started out as viewing a tremendously enjoyable series that has led to a desire to know the Spenser universe as well as creator Robert B. Parker? Two words: Intelligent, non-pandering. Every so often the rarity of a great ensemble cast manages to translate story-to-screen week-after-week in a way that induces the viewer to come back. Robert Urich as Spenser brought an intellect mind to the P.I. genre as no one had prior and his partnership-friendship with long-time associate Hawk (as played by Avery Brooks in the role he shall forever shine in [versus his "Deep Space Nine" stint] displayed, without ever coming right out and stating it, that men being close with other men is not only O.K.- it (friendship) is what life is all about (and that you don't discuss it- you live it AND accept it). The third ingredient, Spenser's paramour, shrink Susan Silverman (as played by the ravishing Barbara Stock) makes for a group of impenetrable smarts and savvy to tackle the most twisted of crimes and criminals. Spenser's police associates, Sergeant Belson (Ron McLarty) and Lt. Quirk (long-time renown actor Richard Jaeckel) complete the team- and... the complement. As portrayed in the novels, they each ultimately are part of a crime-fighting machine, only not in the TV-formulistic manner. One doesn't feel as though the producers of the show have a checklist being annotated during planning and blocking meetings. Stories feel real, with a human flair versus a TV production mill affair. Being set primarily in the Massachusetts-centered New England, and MUCH of the time on location also gives the series a freshness. Invariably "Spenser for Hire" will air in re-runs again. My recommendation: watch it, then go get the novels (there are now 20+). As for the "TV movies" that were on and produced by Lifetime- they are just O.K., each came directly from a Parker Novel (with screenplays authored or co-authored by the creator himself) but other than Urich and Brooks, the remaining principles are cast with different people and the "magic" never quite propagated. But even change can be surprising- which is what I am hoping the upcoming new A&E production of one of the more recent Parker novels, "Small Vices" will be.


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