The Times of Harvey Milk
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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007

6 items from 2017


‘When We Rise’ Review: Why Dustin Lance Black, Gus Van Sant, and Dee Rees’ Miniseries Should Have Been a Movie

23 February 2017 9:17 AM, PST | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

An onslaught of onscreen and offscreen talent unite with a clear sense of purpose in the limited series “When We Rise.” An examination of gay and women’s rights over three decades and how their causes conflict and coalesce, Dustin Lance Black’s new ABC offering emphasizes what’s possible when oppressed minorities come together and fight back against a malicious patriarchy.

There’s no shortage of modern parallels at play, and ABC is counting on the public’s revived passion for protest to drive interest in a show that honors those who paved the way with picket signs and (mostly) passive resistance. The eight-episode series written by Black (mostly) does right by its honorable cause, but it suffers from the strictures of its format. A sprawling story creates an awkward combination of history lessons and personal stories, and broadcast standards prove far too restrictive. The result is a conglomeration »

- Ben Travers

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‘When We Rise’ Review: Why Dustin Lance Black, Gus Van Sant, and Dee Rees’ Miniseries Should Have Been a Movie

23 February 2017 9:17 AM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

An onslaught of onscreen and offscreen talent unite with a clear sense of purpose in the limited series “When We Rise.” An examination of gay and women’s rights over three decades and how their causes conflict and coalesce, Dustin Lance Black’s new ABC offering emphasizes what’s possible when oppressed minorities come together and fight back against a malicious patriarchy.

There’s no shortage of modern parallels at play, and ABC is counting on the public’s revived passion for protest to drive interest in a show that honors those who paved the way with picket signs and (mostly) passive resistance. The eight-episode series written by Black (mostly) does right by its honorable cause, but it suffers from the strictures of its format. A sprawling story creates an awkward combination of history lessons and personal stories, and broadcast standards prove far too restrictive. The result is a conglomeration »

- Ben Travers

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New to Streaming: ‘Cameraperson,’ ‘Aquarius,’ ‘Christine,’ ‘It Follows,’ and More

13 January 2017 8:46 AM, PST | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

With a seemingly endless amount of streaming options — not only the titles at our disposal, but services themselves — we’ve taken it upon ourselves to highlight the titles that have recently hit platforms. Every week, one will be able to see the cream of the crop (or perhaps some simply interesting picks) of streaming titles (new and old) across platforms such as Netflix, iTunes, Amazon, and more (note: U.S. only). Check out our rundown for this week’s selections below.

Aquarius (Kleber Mendonça Filho)

The staggeringly accomplished debut feature by Brazilian critic-turned-director Kleber Mendonça Filho, Neighboring Sounds, announced the arrival of a remarkable new talent in international cinema. Clearly recognizable as the work of the same director, Mendonça’s equally assertive follow-up, Aquarius, establishes his authorial voice as well as his place as one of the most eloquent filmic commentators on the contemporary state of Brazilian society. – Giovanni M. »

- The Film Stage

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‘Cameraperson’ Wins Top Prize at 10th Annual Cinema Eye Honors

11 January 2017 7:25 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Kirsten Johnson’s “Cameraperson” took home three awards at the 10th annual Cinema Eye Honors Wednesday night, including the top prize of outstanding nonfiction feature.

Oscar frontrunner “O.J.: Made in America” was awarded for directing (Ezra Edelman) and producing (Edelman and Caroline Waterlow).

Full list of winners below.

Outstanding Achievement in Nonfiction Feature Filmmaking

Cameraperson

Outstanding Achievement in Direction

Ezra Edelman, “Oj: Made in America

Outstanding Achievement in Editing

Nels Bangerter, “Cameraperson

Outstanding Achievement in Production

Ezra Edelman and Caroline Waterlow, “Oj: Made in America

Outstanding Achievement in Cinematography

Kirsten Johnson, “Cameraperson

Outstanding Achievement in Original Music Score

David Byrne, LeeAnn Rossi and Aaron Rosenblum, “Contemporary Color

Outstanding Achievement in Graphic Design or Animation

Keith Maitland and Craig Staggs, “Tower

Outstanding Achievement in a Debut Feature Film

Hooligan Sparrow” (Nanfu Wang)

Audience Choice Prize

“Gleason”

Outstanding Achievement in Nonfiction Films Made for Television

Making a Murderer

Spotlight Award

“Those Who »

- Kristopher Tapley

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Cinema Eye Honors 2017 Winners List: ‘Cameraperson’ and ‘O.J.: Made in America’ Lead Awards

11 January 2017 4:50 PM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Awards season keeps ticking right along, but tonight’s Cinema Eye Honors promised at least a tiny respite from narrative-based filmmaking, as the New York City-set ceremony is all about honoring the best in the year’s documentary filmmaking.

Big winners included Kirsten Johnson’s “Cameraperson,” which picked up Outstanding Achievement in Nonfiction Feature Filmmaking, along with editing and cinematography wins. Right behind it was Ezra Edelman’s “O.J.: Made in America,” which earned Edelman a directing win, along with a production win for Edelman and Caroline Waterlow. Best TV offering went to “Making a Murderer.”

Nominations were lead by Raoul Peck’s “I Am Not Your Negro” and “O.J.: Made in America,” which each pulled in five nominations apiece, though Johnson’s “Cameraperson” and Gianfranco Rosi’s “Fire at Sea” aren’t far behind, with four nominations each. Both Peck and Rosi’s features ultimately walked away without an award. »

- Kate Erbland

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Cinema Eye Honors Turn 10: How This Oscar-Season Protest Became a Cozy Documentary Club

11 January 2017 7:00 AM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

The Oscars can have its annual celebrity luncheon. This week, several documentarians celebrated the Cinema Eye Honors with an after-hours field trip to the Whitney Museum of American Art.

Conceived in 2008 as a bid to broaden awareness for documentary achievements, the Cinema Eyes highlight a dozen categories that range from best director to best cinematography to graphic design. However, while it began as a tonic to the five-nominee limitations that circumscribe the Oscars, the Cinema Eyes have evolved into an idiosyncratic celebration all its own. Although the awards are Wednesday night at the Museum of the Moving Image in New York, the ceremony is now only the culmination of a full week of programming that includes three days of activities.

“It’s kind of like senior skip week,” said co-founder and filmmaker Aj Schnack, catching his breath on Monday night before delivering a speech to the filmmakers in attendance. “Yes, »

- Eric Kohn

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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007

6 items from 2017


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