Nineteen Eighty-Four (1984) - News Poster

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Bob Ingersoll: The Law Is A Ass #417

  • Comicmix
He’S Not Running A Loki Campaign

It wasn’t funny the first time, okay?

The recent mini-series Vote Loki had the Asgardian god running for President. The series was a political satire with Loki running on the platform that he would lie to America’s face and they would love it. Here’s what followed.

Nisa Contreras, a reporter for the Daily Bugle, attempted to uncover information to discredit Loki. However, every time that she did – Loki’s followers were brainwashed cult members or Loki orchestrated political unrest in Latveria– her efforts backfired. Information which would have torpedoed any other candidate’s chances didn’t discrediting Loki, it made him more popular. The same joke was in issue 2 and repeated in issue 3.

Fortunately for Vote Loki, political satire doesn’t have to be funny. Nineteen Eighty-Four by George Orwell is political satire and it’s about as funny as a Pauly Shore movie.
See full article at Comicmix »

Tribeca Film Review: Tom Hanks and Emma Watson in ‘The Circle’

Tribeca Film Review: Tom Hanks and Emma Watson in ‘The Circle’
The Circle” is a swankly sinister little mind teaser of a thriller. It’s a nightmare vision of what digital culture is turning all of us into, with all of our help. The movie, adapted from Dave Eggers’ 2013 novel and directed by James Ponsoldt (“The End of the Tour”), is about a corporation called The Circle that stores massive amounts of data — financial, medical, social, personal — about each of the account holders who belong to it. The company, based in the Bay Area, knows everything there is to know about you — but it’s all for your own convenience! You could call “The Circle” a dystopian thriller, yet it’s not the usual boilerplate sci-fi about grimly abstract oppressors lording it over everyone else. The movie is smarter and creepier than that; it’s a cautionary tale for the age of social-media witch hunts and compulsive oversharing. The fascist digital
See full article at Variety - Film News »

John Hurt remembered at Oscars ceremony

The late actor, star of Nineteen Eighty-Four and The Elephant Man, was honoured by the Academy in their annual In Memoriam montage

Follow all the action from this year’s Oscars

John Hurt, the celebrated British actor who was nominated twice for Academy Awards but never won, has been remembered in the In Memoriam section of the 2017 Oscars ceremony in Los Angeles.

Hurt’s nominations were for best actor for The Elephant Man in 1981, the David Lynch-directed film about a disfigured man in Victorian London, and for best supporting actor in 1979 for his role as a prison junkie in Alan Parker’s Midnight Express.

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

John Hurt remembered at Oscars ceremony

The late actor, star of Nineteen Eighty-Four and The Elephant Man, was honoured by the Academy in their annual In Memoriam montage

John Hurt, the celebrated British actor who was nominated twice for Academy Awards but never won, has been remembered in the In Memoriam section of the 2017 Oscars ceremony in Los Angeles.

Hurt’s nominations were for best actor for The Elephant Man in 1981, the David Lynch-directed film about a disfigured man in Victorian London, and for best supporting actor in 1979 for his role as a prison junkie in Alan Parker’s Midnight Express.

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Us cinemas to show Nineteen Eighty-Four in anti-Trump protest

Coordinated screenings across North America set for 4 April to highlight Orwell’s portrait of a government ‘that manufactures facts’

Nearly 90 cinemas in the Us and Canada are planning to show the film adaptation of George Orwell’s Nineteen Eighty-Four, starring the late John Hurt, in protest at President Trump’s policies. The coordinated screenings will take place on 4 April, the date that the book’s central character Winston Smith writes on the first page of his illegal diary.

Related: Peter Bradshaw on John Hurt: 'A virtual folk memory of wisdom and style'

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See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Trump-Era Broadway: George Orwell’s ‘1984’ to Open in June

  • The Wrap
Trump-Era Broadway: George Orwell’s ‘1984’ to Open in June
George Orwell’s “Nineteen Eighty-Four” has returned to the top of the best-seller lists, and now a new adaptation of the 1949 dystopian classic is bound for Broadway. Sonia Friedman and Scott Rudin announced Thursday they will be producing Robert Icke and Duncan Macmillan’s “1984,” which has had four acclaimed runs in the U.K. at Headlong, Nottingham Playhouse, and the Almeida Theatre, London. The production, which relies on video projections to re-create Orwell’s ominous “Big Brother,” will open on June 22, 2017 at the Hudson Theatre. Also Read: Clive Owen to Star in Julie Taymor's 'M Butterfly' Broadway Revival Like the novel,
See full article at The Wrap »

R.I.P. John Hurt (1940 – 2017)

British actor and icon John Hurt sadly passed away yesterday. The news comes from The Hollywood Reporter and while they do not list an exact cause of death, Hurt had been battling pancreatic cancer since June 2015. He was 77.

Hurt has had a prolific career in film, both in the U.K. and Hollywood. Throughout his career Hurt was nominated for two Academy Awards – one as Best Supporting Actor for Midnight Express (for which he won a Golden Globe) and again as Best Actor for The Elephant Man. He is also an actor who – much like Sean Bean – is known for being killed off in many of his movies.

His most famous onscreen death is perhaps the chest-bursting sequence in Ridley Scott’s seminal Alien with Sigourney Weaver. One popular fact about that scene is that none of the other actors knew it was coming and truly thought Hurt was choking
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

British legend John Hurt dies at 77

  • ScreenDaily
British legend John Hurt dies at 77
Update: The two-time Oscar-nominated British star of The Elephant Man and Midnight Express has died, his publicist confirmed to Screen on Friday night. He was 77.

Hurt was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer in 2015 and continued to work after it appeared he had overcome the disease. However last summer he withdrew from the stage revival of The Entertainer upon the advice of his doctors. According to his publicist Hurt had intestinal issues when he died.

He recently played a priest in the Natalie Portman starrer Jackie and was in the cast of Joe Wright’s upcoming Second World War drama Darkest Hour for Working Title and Focus Features.

His wife Anwen Rees-Myers issued the following statement: “It is with deep sadness that I have to confirm that my husband, John Vincent Hurt, died on Wednesday 25th January 2017 at home in Norfolk.

“John was the most sublime of actors and the most gentlemanly of gentlemen with the greatest of hearts
See full article at ScreenDaily »

John Hurt, Oscar-Nominated 'Elephant Man' Actor, Dead at 77

John Hurt, Oscar-Nominated 'Elephant Man' Actor, Dead at 77
John Hurt, the Oscar-nominated British actor who starred in films like The Elephant Man, Midnight Express, Alien and the Harry Potter series over a career that spanned more than 50 years, died Friday at the age of 77. Hurt's agent confirmed the actor's death to the BBC.

No cause of death was immediately known, but Hurt revealed in 2015 that he was battling pancreatic cancer. "I can’t say I worry about mortality, but it’s impossible to get to my age and not have a little contemplation of it,” Hurt told the Radio Times after the diagnosis.
See full article at Rolling Stone »

John Hurt, Oscar-Nominated Star of ‘The Elephant Man,’ Dies at 77

John Hurt, Oscar-Nominated Star of ‘The Elephant Man,’ Dies at 77
John Hurt, the wiry English actor who played a drug addict in “Midnight Express,” Kane in “Alien,” the title character in “The Elephant Man,” and Winston Smith in “1984” has died. He was 77.

He died on Wednesday at home in Norfolk, his widow, Anwen, confirmed in a statement to Variety. Hurt had disclosed in 2015 that he had been diagnosed with pancreatic cancer.

Anwen wrote as a tribute, “John was the most sublime of actors and the most gentlemanly of gentlemen with the greatest of hearts and the most generosity of spirit. He touched all our lives with joy and magic and it will be a strange world without him.”

Mel Brooks, executive producer of “The Elephant Man,” tweeted that he was a “truly magnificent talent.”

It was terribly sad today to learn of John Hurt's passing. He was a truly magnificent talent.

Mel Brooks (@MelBrooks) January 28, 2017

No one could have
See full article at Variety - Film News »

House Of Cards season 4 spoiler-filled review

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The Underwoods' single-minded pursuit of power is the story of House Of Cards season 4, which paves the way for a truly exciting season 5...

This review contains spoilers.

There was a very telling moment towards the end of this season of House Of Cards. It involved Claire Underwood and a question that, were this real life, would have dogged her campaign to join her husband’s presidential ticket. It came from Hannah Conway who, as the wife of Republican challenger William, might have been better prepared to withstand pointed comparisons with the First Lady. "Do you regret not having children?", asked the younger woman. Claire’s response was politely acid. "Do you regret having yours?". It was a line that was meant to shock, which it did, but only because it broke one of our society’s mild taboos, in which procreation is seen as a universal good and choosing not to,
See full article at Den of Geek »

Review: 'Creative Control' Starring Benjamin Dickinson, Nora Zehetner, Alexia Rasmussen And Reggie Watts

Billed as taking place “five minutes” in the future, writer-director Benjamin Dickinson’s dry comedy "Creative Control" isn’t the first to use a science fiction setting to satirize current culture. More serious works like “Nineteen Eighty-Four,” “The Handmaid's Tale,” and much of Philip K. Dick’s bibliography have commented on their creators’ current experience through the lens of an imagined world. “Creative Control” takes a similar approach, though the distance between the present and future is far smaller than many of its predecessors, and it relies far more on the comedy inherent in its near-future situations. Read More: Watch The Trailer For Acclaimed Sci-Fi-Ish Tech Industry Satire 'Creative Control' With its focus on augmented reality and its immersive capabilities, Dickinson’s film is fully aware of its audience. It premiered at tech-centric SXSW in 2015 and offered content exclusives to Mashable and The Verge, rather than the more traditional entertainment.
See full article at The Playlist »

Trailer: Sex Finds A Way In The Future Dystopia of Equals

A future-set love story in a world where emotions have been eradicated, Nicolas Hoult and Kristen Stewart participate in the long tradition of this idea in the history of pop literature, and cinema, from the big dumb action of The Island and Equilibrium, to George Lucas' cooler ideological Thx-1138, the flower-powered Logan's Run, ll the way back to George Orwell's seminal novel Nineteen Eighty-Four. It is good happenstance that Ridley Scott, who famously re-purposed the iconography of Orwell for Apple Inc. as a TV advertisement to launch their Macintosh computer, acts as the producer on Equals, a handsome looking indie from director Drake Doremus.I dug the film quite a bit when I caught it at Tiff last year. Maybe it is the sound track, but...

[Read the whole post on twitchfilm.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

Nineteen Eighty-Four

Where do I get my Big Brother campaign pin and yard poster? Michael Radford's elaborate Orwell adaptation sticks closely to the original book, even after decades of deriviative dystopias have stolen its fire. John Hurt is excellent as Winston Smith, and Richard Burton is his inquisitor. Nineteen Eighty-Four Blu-ray Twilight Time Limited Edition 1984 / Color / 1:85 widescreen / 111 min. / Ship Date December 8, 2016 / available through Twilight Time Movies / 29.95 Starring John Hurt, Richard Burton, Suzanna Hamilton, Cyril Cusack, Gregor Fisher, James Walker, Phyllis Logan. Cinematography Roger Deakins Production Designer Allan Cameron Art Direction Martin Hebert, Grant Hicks Film Editor Tom Priestley Original Music (2) Dominick Muldowney / Eurythmics Written by Jonathan Gems, Michael Radford from the novel by George Orwell Produced by Al Clark, Robert Devereux, Simon Perry, Marvin J. Rosenblum Directed by Michael Radford

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

George Orwell's pessimistic 1948 novel 1984 is probably the most important political book of the last century.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

John Hurt given all-clear on cancer

Actor best known for his roles in The Elephant Man and Nineteen Eighty-Four first revealed diagnosis in June

Sir John Hurt has said he’s overjoyed and thrilled after being given the all-clear by doctors less than four months after he disclosed that he had pancreatic cancer.

The 75-year-old actor, known for his roles in The Elephant Man, Nineteen Eighty-Four and the Harry Potter films, revealed he had overcome the disease to an audience at the Man Booker prize ceremony in London.

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Equals review - Kristen Stewart and Nicholas Hoult fail to compute in moribund sci-fi parable

Set in a future world where emotions are banned and relationships outlawed, Drake Doremus’ venture into science-fiction falls flat

American director Drake Doremus made his name with Like Crazy and Breathe In, a pair of films about obstacle-strewn relationships filmed in a distinctively raw, improvisational style. He brings the same sense of frustrated yearning and jittery, unmediated tenderness to this film – but, rather remarkably, Doremus has gone all sci-fi with – if we’re being honest – a not entirely successful outcome. Equals resembles George Lucas’s classic fable of white-suit futurism Thx 1138 as if reshot as a perfume commercial: Oppression, by Calvin Klein.

Nicholas Hoult and Kristen Stewart play Silas and Nia, two cogs in the machine of a post-apocalyptic society that has essentially outlawed emotions of any kind: relationships are illegal, friendship non-existent, and any behaviour other than automaton-like functionality is considered deviance worthy of reporting to the authorities,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Equals review - Kristen Stewart and Nicholas Hoult fail to compute in moribund sci-fi parable

Set in a future world where emotions are banned and relationships outlawed, Drake Doremus’ venture into science-fiction falls flat

American director Drake Doremus made his name with Like Crazy and Breathe In, a pair of films about obstacle-strewn relationships filmed in a distinctively raw, improvisational style. He brings the same sense of frustrated yearning and jittery, unmediated tenderness to this film – but, rather remarkably, Doremus has gone all sci-fi with – if we’re being honest – a not entirely successful outcome. Equals resembles George Lucas’s classic fable of white-suit futurism Thx 1138 as if reshot as a perfume commercial: Oppression, by Calvin Klein.

Nicholas Hoult and Kristen Stewart play Silas and Nia, two cogs in the machine of a post-apocalyptic society that has essentially outlawed emotions of any kind: relationships are illegal, friendship non-existent, and any behaviour other than automaton-like functionality is considered deviance worthy of reporting to the authorities,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Cinematographer Roger Deakins Shooting Blade Runner 2

As if we weren’t already excited enough about Blade Runner 2, today brings word that cinematographer Roger Deakins has signed on to shoot the long-awaited sci-fi sequel, reteaming with director Denis Villeneuve after two extremely fruitful collaborations on Prisoners and Sicario.

The 12-time Oscar-nominated lenser is without a doubt the best in the business. Over the years, he’s teamed with everyone from Frank Darabont (The Shawshank Redemption) to Stephen Daldry (The Reader). A frequent collaborator of the Coen Brothers and Sam Mendes, Deakins has excelled in every genre he’s ever attempted, never failing to create atmospheric, fully realized worlds for filmmakers to explore.

He’s certainly not best known for futuristic dystopias, having shot just two films – In Time and Nineteen Eighty-Four – that can be considered sci-fi, but it’s going to be absolutely thrilling to see how Deakins recreates the world of Blade Runner (previously lensed by
See full article at We Got This Covered »

Blade Runner 2: Cinematographer Roger Deakins Will Shoot the Sci-Fi Sequel

Good news, everyone! When it was announced that Denis Villeneuve would be directing Blade Runner 2, my first thought was, “Hey that’s pretty cool!" And my second thought was, “Wait, does this mean Roger Deakins is going to shoot a Blade Runner movie?!” Indeed. Alcon Entertainment announced today that the 12-time Oscar nominated cinematographer will be reuniting with Villeneuve on the project, marking their third collaboration after Prisoners and the upcoming Sicario. Deakins is quite possibly the best director of photography who’s ever lived, so the prospect of him capturing the world of Blade Runner is beyond enticing. A frequent collaborator of the Coen Brothers, Deakins has shined in a variety of genres from Western (True Grit) to comedy (The Big Lebowski) to James Bond (Skyfall). While he did shoot 2011’s In Time and 1984’s Nineteen Eighty-Four, we haven’t seen much from Deakins in the realm of sci-fi,
See full article at Collider.com »

Gattaca: looking back at Andrew Niccol’s Sf masterpiece

With Good Kill in UK cinemas this week, Ryan looks back at writer-director Andrew Niccol’s classic sci-fi debut, 1997's Gattaca...

It’s all there in that swooning opening music: Gattaca isn’t just another sleek film about the future. The feature debut of New Zealand-born director Andrew Niccol, the smart, elegant, intensely moving Gattaca may just be his finest film to date.

The film introduces us to Vincent Freeman (Ethan Hawke), who’s in the process of a carrying out a painstaking daily ritual: shaving every stray hair from his body, exfoliating his skin and burning the material left behind - it’s as though Vincent’s treating himself as a crime scene.

Vincent lives in a future where genetic profiling has divided society into Valids - those whose DNA has been fettled to perfection by scientists before birth - and In-valids - those conceived naturally, with all potential genetic flaws it involves.
See full article at Den of Geek »
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