7.2/10
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Nineteen Eighty-Four (1984)

R | | Drama, Sci-Fi | 22 March 1985 (USA)
In a totalitarian future society, a man, whose daily work is re-writing history, tries to rebel by falling in love.

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Writers:

(novel),
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Popularity
1,990 ( 194)

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ON DISC
Nominated for 1 BAFTA Film Award. Another 5 wins & 1 nomination. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
...
Suzanna Hamilton ...
...
...
Parsons
James Walker ...
...
Tillotson
David Trevena ...
David Cann ...
Martin
Anthony Benson ...
Jones
Peter Frye ...
Rutherford
...
Waiter
Rupert Baderman ...
Winston Smith as a Boy
Corinna Seddon ...
Winston's Mother
Martha Parsey ...
Winston's Sister
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Storyline

After The Atomic War the world is divided into three states. London is a city in Oceania, ruled by a party that has total control over all its citizens. Winston Smith is one of the bureaucrats, rewriting history in one of the departments. One day he commits the crime of falling in love with Julia. They try to escape Big Brother's listening and viewing devices, but, of course, nobody can really escape. Written by Mattias Thuresson

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

The year of the movie. The movie of the year. See more »

Genres:

Drama | Sci-Fi

Certificate:

R | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

Official Sites:

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

22 March 1985 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

1984  »

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Box Office

Budget:

£3,000,000 (estimated)

Gross USA:

$8,400,000
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

(Eastmancolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.66 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The film features a salute which never was used in the novel. It is done by holding one's arms up and making the wrists cross each other in the shape of a small V. A similar salute is seen in the film, Pink Floyd: The Wall (1982). Christine Hargreaves, who played the soup lady in this film, played Pink's mother in "The Wall". See more »

Goofs

When Winston and Julia are together in the room upstairs for the second time, Julia asks Winston what time the clock on the wall says. He responds that it is 21 hours, or 9pm. When Julia leaves and Winston picks up the glass ball off the table, the clock behind it shows 2:30. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Big Brother: [voice-over] This is our land. A land of peace and of plenty. A land of harmony and hope. This is our land. Oceania. These are our people. The workers, the strivers, the builders. These are our people. The builders of our world, struggling, fighting, bleeding, dying. On the streets of our cities and on the far-flung battlefields. Fighting against the mutilation of our hopes and dreams. Who are they?
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Crazy Credits

"This film was photographed in and around London during the period April-June 1984, the exact time and setting imagined by the author." See more »

Connections

Referenced in The Matrix (1999) See more »

Soundtracks

Julia
Written & Performed by The Eurythmics
(VHS version only)
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
The book is much, much better.
16 July 2005 | by See all my reviews

I had high hopes for this movie, because I enjoyed the book so much. However, I don't think I would have understood the premise of the movie if I hadn't already read the book. The movie is a noble attempt to show the despair of people trying to break the bonds of overpowering government rule, but the book portrays the suffering much more thoroughly. The corrupt government officials have comfortable, almost luxurious lives, while the common people struggle to obtain the bare necessities for survival. Perhaps most people feel this way toward their leaders and rulers regardless of whether or not they are actually oppressed or repressed. Orwell's dystopia seems as if it could exist in many places in our modern world. It has been several years since I've read the book, but one hears references to Big Brother, the Thought Police, and Newspeak frequently in the media and casual conversation. Probably many people using these terms don't realize where the terms came from. I strongly recommend that you read the book.


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