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The Muppets Take Manhattan (1984) Poster

Trivia

Jump to: Cameo (6) | Director Cameo (1) | Spoilers (4)
In an interview, Juliana Donald (Jenny) recalled how filming of the jogging scene in the park was temporarily delayed by a camera problem. In wide eyed amazement, a little boy passing by approached and started talking to Kermit the Frog, oblivious to Jim Henson operating him. Despite the surrounding commotion of technicians trying to fix the camera issue, Jim started interacting with the boy. Moments later, Jim found himself doing an impromptu performance with Kermit for an entire group of children who had gathered around to watch. Juliana said, "It was so memorable to me because time just stopped. It was a wonderfully magical moment where you experience someone's true joy with their work."
The portrait of Kermit the Frog in his producer's disguise has become a permanent fixture at the real Sardi's and can be seen in other movies set there.
First appearance of the Muppet Babies (1984) characters, whose cartoon premiered two months after the film's release.
Film debut of Gates McFadden (credited as "Cheryl McFadden"), playing Mr. Price's secretary. McFadden worked with Jim Henson as a choreographer and puppeteer on The Dark Crystal (1982) and Labyrinth (1986) but is best known as Dr. Beverly Crusher of Star Trek: The Next Generation (1987).
The first The Muppets movie in which the fourth wall is never broken.
The kennel at which Rowlf is working has several dogs in labeled cages. Two of the cages say "Jim" and "Frank", in honor of Jim Henson and Frank Oz.
One of the rats is introduced as 'Tatooey' thus making him, not only Tatooey the rat, but also 'Rat Tatooey' which is a play on the word 'ratatouille' which is the name of a traditional French dish.
Rizzo the Rat appeared throughout the final season of The Muppet Show (1976) and along with Scooter as the Happiness Hotel bellhops in The Great Muppet Caper (1981), but this is his first major role with The Muppets and his first appearance with his more "wiseguy" personality.
The soundtrack to this movie is the only theatrical Muppet movie soundtrack to have never been available on CD. However, three songs from the film ("Together Again," "I'm Gonna Always Love You," and "He'll Make Me Happy") were released on The Muppets music collection "Music, Mayhem and More!".
The scene of Miss Piggy singing "Saying Goodbye" with Kermit was filmed at the Lackawanna Rail Terminal in Hoboken, New Jersey. The train Piggy is on is an electric train designed and built by Thomas A. Edison.
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The scene where Kermit the Frog graduates from college was filmed at Vassar College in New York. Director Frank Oz wanted it shot in front of the most academic looking building on the campus: the dining hall.
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As with The Muppet Movie (1979), this can be read as an allegory of Jim Henson's career. Like his creator, Kermit gains local popularity performing during his college years, decides to try his luck in New York, struggles, takes an unlikely detour into the world of advertising, then gets his big break.
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Some of the shows advertised in posters on the walls of Mr. Price/Plotsky's offices include "No Problem," "So Hot," "Ahab!," "Two Too Much," "The Golden Touch", and "Unicorns Don't Cry".
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Baby Rowlf can be seen "operating" on a plush Big Bird toy during the Muppet Babies dream sequence, which appears to be the Big Bird Talking Plush toy made in 1980 by Child Guidance.
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There was a deleted scene in which two little people stayed in lockers by the Muppets.
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Speaking on the film's MPAA rating, Jim Henson said, "There have been only four G movies this year. Isn't that amazing? I would never do a Muppet movie that wasn't a G. It's said that the G rating has a stigma. Kids don't want to see kiddie movies anymore."
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When one of the rats is mixing batter by using an eggbeater as an exercise bike, the effects crew mixed several chemicals together to resemble batter. They somehow created a corrosive substance that was eating right through the mixing bowls and they feared was toxic. Finally a female crewmember made some actual pancake batter, which they used for the final scene.
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The Great Muppet Caper (1981), by far the craziest and least serious Muppet movie, hadn't done particularly well in the box office, so they toned the wackiness down for this one.
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This is the only Muppet movie not to have any sort of central antagonist .
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Film debut of veteran stage and television actress Linda Lavin.
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A cameo for Dustin Hoffman (playing a producer) was written. At the last minute, Hoffman decided not to appear in the film.
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The teaser trailer for the film was composed entirely of footage created independently of the film. A breathless announcer describes the excitement and spectacle of Broadway, and the many hopefuls who come to New York seeking stardom. Kermit and Miss Piggy only appear briefly at the end of the trailer.
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Instead of being traditional hand puppets, the tiny rats are controlled with rods to operate their heads and mouths.
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Approximately 175 people as extras and a handful that were puppeteers performed during the wedding finale sequence. The crowd sequence took one day to film.
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The wedding finale features many of Kermit's Sesame Street (1969) friends, although only Bert, Ernie, and Cookie Monster have speaking roles.
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Jim Henson initially planned to film the project in late spring 1983. Having directed The Great Muppet Caper (1981) and The Dark Crystal (1982) back-to-back, Henson decided to serve as the producer along with David Lazer. Upon selecting Frank Oz to handle directorial duties, Henson stated, "I was looking at the year ahead and I thought my life was very busy and I thought maybe it was a time to have Frank directing one of these."
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The first draft titled The Muppets: The Legend Continues, written by Muppet Caper scribes Jay Tarses and Tom Patchett, was dismissed by Frank Oz for being "way too over jokey". After being given Jim Henson's encouragement to tinker with the script, Oz revised the screenplay in an effort to develop the "oomph of the characters and their relationships"
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When one of the rats is greasing the grill by skating on it with pats of butter on his feet, the effects crew tried several ways to get the proper sizzling effect. In the end, actual butter on a hot surface worked just fine.
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In the scene where Kermit tells the assorted characters that they can all be in the show, the bear standing in the back of the group is Bobo the Bear from Muppets Tonight (1996).
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As was done with The Great Muppet Caper (1981), Miss Piggy had a human "stunt double," who was used in the long shots during the roller skating sequence.
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The film's working title was Muppet Movie III.
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Although the film didn't out-gross its predecessors, it was the second highest-grossing G-rated film of 1984 (behind the re-issue of Disney's Pinocchio (1940)).
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The entire movie was made as an homage to the old Judy Garland/Mickey Rooney musicals.
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Uncle Travelling Matt from Fraggle Rock (1983) is in the audience (in the chapel) during the wedding scene.
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The film's title references the 1925 song "Manhattan," by Lorenz Hart and Richard Rodgers, with its lyric "I'll take Manhattan, the Bronx, and Staten Island too." The Muppets popularized the phrase "Take Manhattan" as a title, which other films and TV series have used since.
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Gonzo carries a Gucci bag in the movie.
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The perfume sold by Miss Piggy and Joan Rivers is called "Quelle Difference," which is French for "what's the difference?"
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This is the only major Muppet movie where nobody breaks the fourth wall, even once.
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Cameo 

Gregory Hines: Lends Miss Piggy his roller skates so that she may chase down the purse-snatcher. Also participates in Kermit the Frog and Miss Piggy's reunion/confrontation immediately after the chase.
Jim Henson: As the horse and carriage driver.
Kathryn Mullen: helps Miss Piggy after her purse is stolen.
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Heather Henson: At the Bavarian festival serving drinks.
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Fran Brill: As a reporter.
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David Lazer: In Sardi's Restaurant.
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Director Cameo 

Frank Oz: At the board meeting for "Ocean Breeze Soap".
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Spoilers 

The trivia items below may give away important plot points.

Frank Oz cast the reverend Cyril Jenkins in the wedding sequence for authenticity, justifying Kermit's surprise at the presence of "a real minister."
Both the storybook and comic book adaptations of the film include scenes that were presumably filmed but deleted. Both versions include a sequence where Rizzo and Gonzo attempt to cure Kermit's amnesia, a scene where Gonzo tells Kermit the Frog that the wedding minister is a real one, and an allusion to Beauregard taking The Electric Mayhem to New York. The storybook also has a scene of Dr. Bunsen Honeydew performing a bizarre experiment on Animal.
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Ronnie Crawford can be seen in "You can't take no for answer," being saddened when The Muppets are kicked out of the office he is in.
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This is the last Muppet film to feature Sesame Street (1969) Muppets
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See also

Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

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