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C.O. 'Doc' Erickson dead at 93

C.O. 'Doc' Erickson dead at 93
The producer and production manager associated with Chinatown and Groundhog Day, died on Wednesday from heart complications.

Born on December 17,1923, C.O. ‘Doc’ Erickson was living in Las Vegas when he died from heart complications, according to The Gersh Agency.

Erickson began his career at Paramount Pictures, serving as production manager on five Alfred Hitchcock films during the mid-to-late 1950s, including Rear Window, To Catch A Thief, The Trouble With Harry, The Man Who Knew Too Much and Vertigo.

The producer left Paramount in the early 1960s to become John Huston’s associate producer on The Misfits, Freud, and 1967s Reflections In A Golden Eye.

He went on to serve as production manager on Joseph L Mankiewicz’s There Was A Crooked Man and also spent three years supervising film production for Brut Productions.

He would later become associated with Robert Evans on Chinatown, Players, Urban Cowboy, and Popeye.

Other producer-production credits include 55 Days At Peking, [link
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C.O. ‘Doc’ Erickson, Alfred Hitchcock Associate, Dies at 93

C.O. ‘Doc’ Erickson, Alfred Hitchcock Associate, Dies at 93
Longtime motion picture producer and executive C.O. “Doc” Erickson, who worked on Alfred Hitchcock’s movies along with “Chinatown,” “Blade Runner,” and “Groundhog Day,” died Wednesday in Las Vegas due to heart complications. He was 93.

He began his career at Paramount Pictures, serving as production manager on five Hitchcock films: “Rear Window” (1954), “To Catch a Thief” (1955), “The Trouble with Harry” (1955), “The Man Who Knew Too Much” (1956), and “Vertigo” (1958).

He left Paramount to become John Huston’s associate producer on “The Misfits” (1961), “Freud” (1962), and “Reflections in a Golden Eye” (1967). He was production manager on Joseph L. Mankiewicz’s “There Was a Crooked Man…” (1970).

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Erickson spent three years supervising film production for Brut Productions and later became associated with Robert Evans on “Chinatown” (1974), “Players” (1979), “Urban Cowboy” (1980), and “Popeye” (1980). Other producer/production credits include “55 Days at Peking” (1963), “Magic” (1978), “Blade Runner” (1982), “Nicholas and Alexandra” (1971), “Fast Times at Ridgemont High” (1982), “The Lonely Guy” (1984), “Stuart Saves His Family” (1995), and
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Watch: The Greeting Card Business Gets Weird In Bob Odenkirk's 'Girlfriend's Day' Trailer

  • Movies.com
You can tell Bob Odenkirk is the perfect loser in Girlfriend's Day because he plays a professional greeting card writer. The irony of such a job for such a character has been seen before in The Lonely GuyMissing PiecesMr. Deeds, (500) Days of Summer and, with a bit of variation, Her. In this new movie, a Netflix original, the main premise is that he used to be the best at it and now must reign again through a contest related to the titular new holiday. Odenkirk seems perfect for the role, as it's almost like he's playing his TV character Saul Goodman from Breaking Bad and now Better Call Saul as a writer instead of a lawyer. He co-wrote the script with his old Mr. Show collaborator Eric Hoffman...

Read More
See full article at Movies.com »

Daily | Arthur Hiller, 1923 – 2016

"Arthur Hiller, an Academy Award-nominated director whose long career began in live television and flourished in the movies in the 1970s with crowd-pleasers like the phenomenally successful Love Story, died on Wednesday in Los Angeles," writes Dave Kehr for the New York Times. As Patrick Hipes notes at Deadline, Love Story would lead "to a streak of big movies for Hiller that spanned especially comedy including The Hospital, penned by Paddy Chayefsky (who also wrote The Americanization of Emily); Silver Streak with Gene Wilder and Richard Pryor; The In-Laws with Peter Falk and Alan Arkin; The Lonely Guy with Steve Martin; and Outrageous Fortune starring Shelley Long and Bette Midler. He also helmed the film adaptations of Neil Simon’s The Out of Towners and Plaza Suite." We're collecting remembrances. » - David Hudson
See full article at Keyframe »

Arthur Hiller, 'Love Story' Director, Dead at 92

Arthur Hiller, 'Love Story' Director, Dead at 92
Arthur Hiller, the director of Love Story, The Out-of-Towners, The In-Laws, The Hospital, among others, died Wednesday of natural causes, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences announced. Hiller, who served as the Academy president between 1993 and 1997, was 92.

Hiller is best known for directing 1970's Love Story, the Oscar-nominated drama starring Ali MacGraw and Ryan O'Neal. Filmed on a shoestring budget of $2 million, the film went on to gross over $106 million, or $659 million in today's adjusted box office. As The Hollywood Reporter notes, the success of Love Story, considered one of cinema's greatest tearjerkers,
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Arthur Hiller, Director of ‘Love Story,’ Dies at 92

Arthur Hiller, Director of ‘Love Story,’ Dies at 92
Canadian-born director Arthur Hiller, who spent more than a decade mostly working in television before a career in feature helming that included “Love Story,” “The Americanization of Emily” and comedy “Silver Streak,” died Wednesday. He was 92.

Love Story,” based on the bestseller by Erich Segal, was an enormous box office hit in 1970 and was nominated for seven Oscars, including best picture. Though many critics dismissed the movie as too sentimental, it is No. 9 on the AFI’s list of the most romantic films of all time.

Hiller served as president of the Directors Guild of America from 1989-93 and of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences from 1993-97. He received the Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award at the 2002 Academy Awards ceremony.

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences issued a statement. “We are deeply saddened by the passing of our beloved friend Arthur Hiller,” said Academy president Cheryl Boone Isaacs. “I
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Arthur Hiller, Director of ‘Love Story,’ Dies at 92

Arthur Hiller, Director of ‘Love Story,’ Dies at 92
Canadian-born director Arthur Hiller, who spent more than a decade mostly working in television before a career in feature helming that included “Love Story,” “The Americanization of Emily” and comedy “Silver Streak,” died Wednesday. He was 92.

Love Story,” based on the bestseller by Erich Segal, was an enormous box office hit in 1970 and was nominated for seven Oscars, including best picture. Though many critics dismissed the movie as too sentimental, it is No. 9 on the AFI’s list of the most romantic films of all time.

Hiller served as president of the Directors Guild of America from 1989-93 and of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences from 1993-97. He received the Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award at the 2002 Academy Awards ceremony.

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences issued a statement. “We are deeply saddened by the passing of our beloved friend Arthur Hiller,” said Academy president Cheryl Boone Isaacs.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Take Two: Revisiting "Stir Crazy"

  • Hitfix
Take Two: Revisiting
Our weekly series in which writers revisit for the first time in ages their youthful passions and reconsider how well they hold up with the passage of time. The late 1970’s were a glorious time to be first discovering movies. For a boy in his adolescence, there were of course the complete life-altering revelations of seeing “Jaws,” “Star Wars,” “Close Encounters” and eventually “Raiders” on opening day, surrounded by hundreds of other kids struck absolutely dumb at the spectacle before them. It was impossible to be young in those days and not become obsessed with the movies. But best of all were the comedies. It was an era when the genre was of re-inventing itself; moving out of the code restrictions that had hemmed comedy in since the dawn of Hollywood, the movies suddenly found itself let loose with acres of previously untouchable terrain to roam, and very few rules to guide them.
See full article at Hitfix »

‘Smurfs’ Movie Happening, ‘Scooby-Doo’ Director Tapped

In news that some of you are sure to proclaim as Smurftastic, Sony has announced that a live-action/animated “Smurfs” is heading to silver screens next year. The movie will hit theaters in 2D and 3D formats on December 17, 2010. A Variety report reveals that the studio has turned to Raja Gosnell to handle the directing duties.

For those who are too young to remember, “The Smurfs” was a hit animated TV series that ran throughout the 1980s. The titular Smurfs are a race of pint-sized, blue-skinned, white hat-wearing creatures who use the word “smurf” as a verb, adverb, adjective and anything else. It is a multipurpose term, sort of like Hebrew’s “shalom” or “Bill & Ted’s Bogus Journey”’s “station.”

Gosnell has been working in Hollywood for a long time, though most of his work has been as an editor. He worked on such classics at the 1984 Steve Martin comedy “The Lonely Guy,
See full article at MTV Movies Blog »

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