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Johnny Dangerously (1984) Poster

Trivia

The newspaper issue when Dundee retires poses the question "Who is Johnny Dangerously?" The associated sketch is of Sylvester Stallone.
Jump to: Cameo (2)
For legal reasons, the "Weird Al" Yankovic song "This Is the Life" was not included on the home video release of the movie.
The film producers learned that Danny DeVito might not make his shooting dates, because he was still shooting Romancing the Stone (1984) in Mexico, and barely made it to the set in time.
One of the first movies with a PG-13 rating.
The newspaper photo of D.A. Burr (Danny DeVito), is actually one of DeVito's character Louie DePalma from the television show Taxi (1978), and was also used for character "Frank Stedman", also played by Danny Devito, in Head Office (1985).
The "cozy little love nest" offered by the District Attorney to Tommy, is actually the Philadelphia Museum of Art.
Michael Keaton's characterization of Johnny Dangerously frequently spoofs James Cagney, a star of gangster movies from the golden age of old Hollywood.
While the movie sends up classic gangster movies in general, the basic plot point of Johnny and Tommy Kelly ending up on opposite sides of the law is inspired by Manhattan Melodrama (1934). In that film, William Powell and Clark Gable portrayed orphans who are raised together as brothers. Clark Gable's character "Blackie Gallagher" grows up to become a gangster, while William Powell's character Jim Wade becomes a crusading District Attorney (just like Johnny and Tommy, respectively). Also, in both films, the gangster brother roots for the District Attorney brother to succeed.
The closing credits jokingly bill two writers, Neal Israel and Pat Proft, who did not co-write the movie, as "Special Medical Advisers". Neal Israel, also a director, was the second husband of Director Amy Heckerling, and were married around the time that this movie was made and released.
The movie's disappointing reception prompted Director Amy Heckerling to begin writing her own movie projects, instead of filming other people's stories.
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When Johnny discusses going "legit" with Lil, they happily envision all the wonderful things offered by such a lifestyle. One of the benefits cited by Johnny was the ability to "say 'hi' to a neighbor named Fred". This was a tip of the hat to Fred Rogers, as Michael Keaton got started in the industry by working as a stagehand on Mister Rogers' Neighborhood (1968), when he was a young man still living in his native Pittsburgh. So close was their friendship, that, when Fred Rogers died in 2003, Michael Keaton hosted a memorial program on PBS dedicated to his friend and mentor.
The rival crime boss in this film is named Maroni, a named shared by a major crime boss in the Batman universe. Michael Keaton appeared on-screen as the Caped Crusader in Batman (1989) and Batman Returns (1992).
This gangster comedy was released during a cycle of Hollywood movies during the 1980s that sent up gangster films. These movies included: Prizzi's Honor (1985), Wise Guys (1986), Harlem Nights (1989), City Heat (1984), Johnny Dangerously (1984), Little Miss Marker (1980), and Dead Men Don't Wear Plaid (1982).
In the scene where Tommy (Griffin Dunne) is in the hospital room in a full body cast, the hospital loudspeaker pages for "Dr. Michael Hertzberg". Michael Hertzberg is one of the film's producers.
WWE Manager Paul Heyman used to be called "Paul E. Dangerously" earlier in his career, because of his resemblance to Michael Keaton's character in this film.
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Michael Keaton and Danny DeVito starred in Batman Returns (1992) and Dumbo (2019), both directed by Tim Burton.
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Stickers seen on the back of mobster cars saying "I brake for gangsters" and "I'd rather be stealing" parody popular mottos from the early 1980s.
Two of the movie's four screenwriters, Jeff Harris and Bernie Kukoff previously created Diff'rent Strokes (1978).
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The gum that Johnny keeps in his "cigarette case" is a Clove Gum.
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Rival gangster Maroni's butchering of the English language is a parody of the stereotypes of Italian immigrants in old movies who have exaggerated accents and speak poor English. The parody is carried further still whenever Maroni swears.
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During the graduation scene, Ma Kelly pulls a vibrator out of her purse.
Placards seen at "Gangster Arms" said "Legs & Shirley Diamond"; "Pretty Boy & Pretty Girl Floyd"; "Al & Cindy Capone"; and "Johnny Dangerously".
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The "Film Yearbook Volume 4" said that this movie was a "parody burlesque of Warner Brothers gangster films". This movie, ironically though, wasn't made at Warner Brothers, it was made at 20th Century Fox.
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Cameo: Schlitz Malt Liquor Bull: Clyde.
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The real name of Johnny Dangerously was Johnny Kelly. In the closing credits, this character played by Michael Keaton is billed only as Johnny Dangerously.
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Danny DeVito and Marilu Henner starred on Taxi (1978).
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Cameo 

Ray Walston: As a vendor.
Dom DeLuise: As the Pope.

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Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

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