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1-20 of 22 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


Dennis Muren on Making ‘The Empire Strikes Back’, the Special Editions, and Directing ‘Star Tours’

4 September 2017 10:02 AM, PDT | Collider.com | See recent Collider.com news »

As a longtime fan of Dennis Muren’s work in countless films that the entire planet loves, when I was offered the opportunity to speak with the eight-time Academy Award-winning visual effects guru, you could say I jumped at the chance. That’s because throughout my entire life, the work that Murren has done on films like Star WarsThe Empire Strikes BackReturn of the JediE.T.,The AbyssJurassic ParkIndiana Jones and the Temple of DoomInnerspace, and countless others helped form my love of movies, and getting to talk to him about the … »

- Steve 'Frosty' Weintraub

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Dennis Muren on ‘Terminator 2’, Working with James Cameron, and Helping Out on ‘Wall-e’

28 August 2017 10:12 AM, PDT | Collider.com | See recent Collider.com news »

As a longtime fan of Dennis Murren’s work in countless films that the entire planet loves, when I was offered the opportunity to speak with the eight-time Academy Award-winning visual effects guru, you could say I jumped at the chance. That’s because throughout my entire life, the work that Murren has done on films like Star WarsThe Empire Strikes BackReturn of the Jedi, E.T.,The Abyss, Jurassic ParkIndiana Jones and the Temple of Doom, Innerspace, and countless others helped form my love of movies, and getting to talk to him about the … »

- Steve 'Frosty' Weintraub

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1941: A Great Comedy For Slim Pickens Day

27 August 2017 11:12 AM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

On Monday, August 28, 2017, Turner Classic Movies will devote an entire day of their “Summer Under the Stars” series to the late, great Louis Burton Lindley Jr. If that name doesn’t sound familiar, well, then just picture the fella riding the bomb like a buckin’ bronco at the end of Dr. Strangelove…, or the racist taskmaster heading up the railroad gang in Blazing Saddles, or the doomed Sheriff Baker, who gets one of the loveliest, most heartbreaking sendoffs in movie history in Sam Peckinpah’s Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid.

Lindley joined the rodeo circuit when he was 13 and soon picked up the name that would follow him throughout the length of his professional career, in rodeo and in movies & TV. One of the rodeo vets got a look at the lank newcomer and told him, “Slim pickin’s. That’s all you’re gonna get in this rodeo. »

- Dennis Cozzalio

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Superman on new Justice League poster, Ant-Man and The Wasp begins production, Spielberg hates Temple of Doom – Daily News Roundup

2 August 2017 12:55 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Return Of Superman

After being teased at the end of the new trailer for Justice League, Superman has graced a new poster for the DC team-up movie. The Man of Steel also features in some new concept art, which you can check out here.

Heroic Hellboy

It was announced back in May that Hellboy was heading back to the big screen with Stranger Thing‘s David Harbour in the lead role, and the actor has been talking about the heroic qualities of the character. “I definitely think Hellboy is an antihero,” he said. “He was kind of born into it. It wasn’t something like Batman where he chooses to go and fight crime. He was just born this weird half-demon spawned by Nazi occultists and saved by these dudes who tried to raise him right. For him, it’s a sense of discovery. His actual destiny as a ‘hero’ is to end the world. »

- Luke Owen

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Newswire: Sorry, Skull haters: Steven Spielberg thinks Temple Of Doom is the worst Indiana Jones movie

1 August 2017 4:20 PM, PDT | avclub.com | See recent The AV Club news »

Defying the fridge-nuke-decrying, Crystal Skull-loathing masses, Steven Spielberg has made it clear that his least favorite Indiana Jones movie is still 1984’s bug-covered, monkey-brain devouring weirdness factory, Indiana Jones And The Temple Of Doom. This is per The New York Daily News, which recently confirmed Spielberg’s hatred of the film in a chat with Susan Lacy, the interviewer/director for HBO’s upcoming doc about the legendary filmmaker, Spielberg.

You’d think Spielberg would have a certain nostalgic fondness for Temple, given that it’s where he met his wife, Kate Capshaw, who played screaming chanteuse Willie Scott. But, as noted by The Playlist, he’s actually derided the film before: “I wasn’t happy with the second film at all,” Spielberg told reporters back in 1989. “It was too dark, too subterranean, and much too horrific. I thought it out-poltered Poltergeist. There’s not an ounce »

- William Hughes

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Steven Spielberg Reveals His Least Favorite Indiana Jones Movie

1 August 2017 1:02 PM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

With the internet already prepared to pour some Haterade on next year’s “Ready Player One,” it’s worth remembering that Steven Spielberg is not unfamiliar with delivering below expectations. There was the misfire “1941” and some would say even last year’s “The Bfg” missed the mark, but for the filmmaker, there’s another movie that sticks in his craw.

Director Susan Lacy, who helmed the upcoming HBO documentary “Spielberg,” reveals that “Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom” is the director’s least favorite film in that franchise.

Continue reading Steven Spielberg Reveals His Least Favorite Indiana Jones Movie at The Playlist. »

- Kevin Jagernauth

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The Temple of Doom is Steven Spielberg’s least favourite Indiana Jones movie

1 August 2017 6:00 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

If you ask any Indiana Jones fans for their least favourite instalment of the action-adventure franchise, you’d be hard pressed to get any other responses that Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull. Unless you ask Steven Spielberg, it seems.

According to Susan Lacy, director of the upcoming documentary Spielberg, the legendary filmmaker has revealed that out of all four instalments in the series, he likes the 1984 prequel Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom the least. Spielberg apparently also acknowledges some mistakes he made with the World War II comedy 1941, which is widely regarded as one of the lowest (if not the lowest) points of a rather stellar career.

You’ll be able to see Steven Spielberg discussing his career in the documentary when it premiers on HBO on October 7th, while Spielberg is also set to reunite with Harrison Ford for a fifth Indiana Jones movie, »

- Gary Collinson

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The Best Movie Fight Scenes — IndieWire Critics Survey

31 July 2017 10:31 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Every week, IndieWire asks a select handful of film and TV critics two questions and publishes the results on Monday. (The answer to the second, “What is the best film in theaters right now?”, can be found at the end of this post.)

This week’s question: In honor of the bone-crunching “Atomic Blonde,” what is the greatest movie fight scene?

Read More‘Atomic Blonde’: How They Turned One Amazing Action Scene Into a Seven-Minute Long Take Erin Oliver Whitney (@cinemabite), ScreenCrush

I’ve got a soft spot for wuxia so the “best fight scene” immediately evokes Zhang Yimou in my mind. I could list every fight in “Hero,” sequences so spellbindingly beautiful and graceful you forget you’re watching violence. The bamboo forest battle from “House of Flying Daggers” is another all-timer, a mesmerizing fight that almost entirely takes place in the air. And the bone-crunching, table-smashing »

- David Ehrlich

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See All Four Indiana Jones Movies on the Big Screen in August at Select Marcus Theatres

23 July 2017 7:44 PM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

Conceived by George Lucas, brought to the screen by director Steven Spielberg, and made iconic by Harrison Ford, the Indiana Jones series is synonymous with thrilling adventure. That is why Marcus Theatres is proud to bring it back to the big screen this August!

The Indiana Jones Movie will screen each Sunday in August at Noon, and Mondays & Wednesdays at 7pm All tickets only $5!

Group sales and auditorium buyouts are available, and tickets for these events can be purchased in bulk. Please call 1(800) 232-4625 or email Events@MarcusTheatres.com for more information.

The Marcus Theatres in the St. Louis area participating in this event are:

The Galaxy, The Ronnies, The Des Peres, and The St. Charles. For a list of theaters in other locations, go Here

Raiders of the Lost Ark – August 6, 7 & 9

As the Third Reich continues its reign of terror, Adolf Hitler is on a quest for the legendary »

- Tom Stockman

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Votd: How Indiana Jones Merchandise Helped Create the PG-13 Rating

7 July 2017 5:00 AM, PDT | Slash Film | See recent Slash Film news »

Most cinephiles know that Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom was the movie that finally broke the camel’s back when it came to having movies that were either PG, suggesting parental guidance for younger viewers, or R, movies that were intended for audiences 17 and older. The Indiana Jones sequel (which is actually a […]

The post Votd: How Indiana Jones Merchandise Helped Create the PG-13 Rating appeared first on /Film. »

- Ethan Anderton

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Review: Kung Fu Yoga (2017)

4 July 2017 8:46 AM, PDT | The Cultural Post | See recent The Cultural Post news »

A Chinese archaeologist Professor Jack (Jackie Chan) teams up with a beautiful Indian Professor Ashmita (Disha Patani) and her assistant Kyra (Amyra Dastur) to find a lost Magadha treasure. From the freezing Tibetan ice caves, to the scorching beaches of Dubai, they find themselves travelling around the world to locate all the pieces required to unlock the secrets of the treasure. Unfortunately, they are not alone in their search as the descendant of a rebel leader Randall (Sonu Sood) also seeks the treasure and will do anything he can to make sure he gets it.

Kung Fu Yoga is a cultural collaboration between China and India, with both the cast and cultural philosophies incorporated into the film. This is not unusual for Chan who has featured Kung Fu and Buddhist philosophies in his past films. In Kung Fu Yoga he even manages to incorporate this into his fighting, talking through »

- Philip Rogers

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Josh Gates’ Destination Truth searches for the djinn of Petra and an Israeli mermaid

23 June 2017 10:51 AM, PDT | Monsters and Critics | See recent Monsters and Critics news »

This week on Josh GatesDestination Truth, the intrepid team journey to the deserts of Jordan in search of the mysterious djinn and investigate reports of an Israeli mermaid and spirit soldiers in China. The ancient city of Petra in Jordan is an evocative place and was once a thriving trade center with bustling markets and an intricate aquaduct system to provide its many citizens with water. It has also featured in many TV show and movies, most memorably in Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom. However, Josh is more interested in the legends of the djinn that surround...read more »

- James Wray

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This Scene Almost Earned ‘Poltergeist’ an R Rating

4 June 2017 9:00 AM, PDT | bloody-disgusting.com | See recent Bloody-Disgusting.com news »

It is common knowledge now that Tobe Hooper’s Poltergeist, which celebrates its 35th anniversary today, almost single-handedly brought about the advent of the PG-13 rating. With the “help” of later-released violent PG-rated films like Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom and Gremlins, the Motion Picture Association of America decided that there needed to be another rating in between a PG […] »

- Trace Thurman

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How 'The Temple of Doom' Changed the MPAA Ratings System

23 May 2017 6:00 AM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

When fans think of Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom, the first scene that likely comes to mind is the removal of a still-beating heart during a human sacrifice while the Thugs worship the goddess Kali. 

It was graphic. It was scary. And more than anything else, it looked real. 

It was that moment — among other dark, disturbing images (think: sacrifice victim burned alive) in the second installment of the Steven Spielberg and George Lucas adventure series — that upset parents, who felt the film's PG rating from the Motion Picture Association of America was too lenient. Due to the outcry, Spielberg decided there »

- Ryan Parker

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Tokyo Ghoul Inspired Cafe Leaves us All With Serious Questions

17 May 2017 6:30 PM, PDT | TVovermind.com | See recent TVovermind.com news »

Remember the scene in Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom where they’re at the palace and it’s dinner time?  Remember the monkey heads, eyeballs, snakes, and insects that were on display?  Now imagine for a moment that there was a restaurant based on this scene.  Turns out in real life there’s something even worse.   If you’re familiar with the Japanese “Tokyo Ghoul” you might not this is not media for the faint of heart.   Since a Tokyo Ghoul movie is coming out, one cafe in Japan decided to go with a Tokyo Ghoul theme. The Tokyo Ghoul cafe will

Tokyo Ghoul Inspired Cafe Leaves us All With Serious Questions »

- Nat Berman

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Play Expo Leeds 2017 – Report

19 April 2017 6:01 AM, PDT | Blogomatic3000 | See recent Blogomatic3000 news »

This weekend Replay Events, one of the UK’s premier gaming and event entertainment companies and the driving force behind Play Expo Blackpool And Manchester (both events that team Nerdly have attended in the past), added another Northern event to their roster: Play Expo Leeds, an all-day gaming celebration taking place which took place at Leeds United Football Club’s Centenary Pavillion on Sunday April 16th.

Of course the Play Expo events are all about playing games: be it pinball, arcade games or consoles, be they retro or modern. There are plenty of items to buy too – gamers can stock up on retro games, consoles and all sorts of collectables. Many from local vendors (a great way to get your name out there in the community for sure). But the focus of Play Expo’s is most definitely on games.

This latest event in Leeds is easily one of the »

- Phil Wheat

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The Top 5 Movie Explorers

15 April 2017 5:00 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Henry Bevan with his top five movie explorers…

After debuting to generally positive response in the UK, director James Gray’s absorbing, thought-provoking, and fascinating  The Lost City of Z is opening in the United States.

The film follows the exploits of the real-life explorer Percy Fawcett, played by Charlie Hunnam, leading up to his famous disappearance in 1925. The mysterious circumstances surrounding his disappearance have turned Fawcett into a figure almost as mythological as the city he was looking for.

His “myth” has impacted culture and he has inspired the creation of many fictional explorers. Inspired by the film’s Us release, here are the Top 5 Movie Explorers.

5) Milo Thatch – Atlantis: The Lost Empire

If there is one hallmark of many movie explorers it is that they must be obsessed with finding a lost city. Milo Thatch from Disney’s underrated Atlantis: The Lost Empire has been searching for Atlantis his whole life. »

- Henry Bevan

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What Happened to the Women Directors in Hollywood? Part 4: 1984–1999

17 March 2017 2:02 PM, PDT | Women and Hollywood | See recent Women and Hollywood news »

Mississippi Masala

by Carrie Rickey

This five-part Truthdig series by Carrie Rickey is published in partnership with Women and Hollywood. The series considers the historic accomplishments of women behind the camera, how they got marginalized, and how they are fighting for equal employment. Specifically, this series asks, why do females make up between 33 and 50 percent of film-school graduates but account for only seven percent of working directors? What happened to the women directors in Hollywood?

While female filmmakers waited for Judge Pamela Rymer to hand down a decision in the 1983 Directors Guild class-action suit against Warner Brothers and Columbia Pictures, alleging discrimination for not hiring women and ethnic minorities represented by the guild, there were positive signs of change in Hollywood.

In 1984, for the first time that almost anyone could remember, one needed two hands to count the number of feature films by women released in the U.S. market. One was Diane Kurys’ “Entre Nous” (1983), nominated for best foreign film at the Academy Awards in April 1984, making Kurys the second female director whose film was so honored.

Between 1950 and 1980, the number of movies directed by women in the Directors Guild of America (DGA) totaled 14. From 1984 to 1985 there were 12.

In 1984 many women were making their second features. Among them were Gillian Armstrong’s period drama “Mrs. Soffel,” Amy Heckerling’s gangster comedy “Johnny Dangerously,” Penelope Spheeris’ teenage-runaway saga “Suburbia,” and Amy Holden Jones’ romantic drama “Love Letters.” Martha Coolidge, beloved for “Valley Girl,” her 1983 debut, was on her third feature, “National Lampoon’s Joy of Sex.” With more women behind the movie camera in the United States than any time since the ’teens, it seemed that Hollywood was reopening the studio gates to women. Their movies featured women in lead roles.

The wave of optimism crested in 1985. Argentine director Maria Luisa Bemberg’s historical romance “Camila” (1984) was in contention for best foreign film. Susan Seidelman, an Nyu film-school grad who made a splash in 1983 with the indie “Smithereens,” released “Desperately Seeking Susan,” starring “It Girl” Rosanna Arquette and Madonna, cast when the latter was a relative unknown. It was a runaway hit. Heckerling and Spheeris each released third features, respectively “National Lampoon’s European Vacation” and “The Boys Next Door.” Coolidge released her fourth: “Real Genius,” a genuinely funny nerd comedy with a fully developed female character — and special effects.

Then came the crash.

In August 1985 Judge Rymer handed down her decision. While the class-action case was important and viable, Rymer ruled, she had to disqualify the DGA from leading the class due to a conflict of interest. White male members also competing for directing jobs dominated the guild, she said. Thus the DGA was in no position to represent the interests of its women and ethnic minority members. Out of exhaustion and lack of money, the Original Six, the group of female filmmakers that had first spurred the DGA to initiate the suit, did not pursue it any further.

As the DGA suit played out during the early 1980s, Hollywood’s business model was in flux. Studios abandoned the one-size-fits-all strategy of advertising a movie in general-interest publications and embraced segmented marketing — that is, making and marketing movies to a specific demographic. Fewer dollars were spent advertising movies in mainstream newspapers and more were spent on ads that ran during TV shows young males were said to watch. More and more, movies starred predominantly men and boys. Because actors had higher-profile roles, they could command higher salaries than actresses.

By dividing the market into sectors, studios divided the audience and the culture. Boys see movies about boys. Older people see movies about older people. Women see movies about women. Those in different demographics no longer watch the same stories.

In 1980, four of the 10 top box office stars were women: Sally Field, Jane Fonda, Sissy Spacek, and Barbra Streisand. In 1990 there was only one: Julia Roberts. According to 1990 statistics from the Screen Actors Guild, not only were actresses underpaid, but they were also “undercast”: 14 percent of the leading roles, and only 29 percent of all roles, went to women.

The “Indiana Jones” trilogy made in the 1980s reflected the progressively diminishing role of females in film during a decade when male action/adventures dominated the multiplex. In “Raiders of the Lost Ark” (1981), the character Marion Ravenwood (Karen Allen) plays Indy’s helpmate. In “Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom” (1984), the Willie Scott character (Kate Capshaw) is helpless. And in “Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade,” archeologist Elsa Schneider (Alison Doody) is the enemy.

Despite such trends, the late 1980s and 1990s proved to be boom years for female directors in Hollywood and Indiewood, as independent film is known. In 1987, Kathryn Bigelow, a onetime sculptor and graduate of Columbia University’s film program, made her second feature, the “vampire Western” “Near Dark.” And though Elaine May’s studio film “Ishtar” was almost universally panned upon release, it earned belated respect. Richard Brody of The New Yorker correctly described it as “an unjustly derided masterwork.” In 1987, six percent of films were directed by women, higher than at any time since 1916.

The percentage dropped in 1988, but that was a watershed year for female filmmakers. “Big,” a comedy from Penny Marshall (co-written by Anne Spielberg), was universally acclaimed. It was the first movie directed by a woman that surpassed $100 million at the box office. With the romantic comedy “Crossing Delancey,” Joan Micklin Silver returned to making big-screen fare, and her modest hit was well received. Also in 1988, Silver’s daughter, Marisa, made her second feature, “Permanent Record,” about teen suicide. “Salaam, Bombay!”, the first feature from Mira Nair, the India-born, Harvard-educated documentarian, was a best foreign film Oscar nominee.

The following year, “Look Who’s Talking” from Amy Heckerling likewise surpassed the $100 million mark for box office sales in the U.S. and made nearly $300 million worldwide. For the most part, though, heads of studios regarded Marshall’s and Heckerling’s box-office smashes as flukes. Two heads of production told me in 1991 that “movies by women don’t make money.” Nevertheless, it turned out to be a exceptional year for the quality and range of releases from women. And it shaped up to be a year when movies by female filmmakers did make serious money.

Some of the highlights of 1991: Julie Dash’s “Daughters of the Dust,” an evocative portrait of generations of Gullah women off the South Carolina coast circa 1901; Jodie Foster’s “Little Man Tate,” about a child prodigy emotionally torn between his mother and a psychologist for gifted children; and Mira Nair’s “Mississippi Masala,” a sexy romance about a South Asian woman born in Uganda (played by then-newcomer Sarita Choudhry) in love with an African-American man (Denzel Washington). Both Kathryn Bigelow’s action film “Point Break” and Barbra Streisand’s psychological study “Prince of Tides” examined the emotional costs to men who struggle to prove their masculinity. Bigelow’s movie grossed $83 million and Streisand’s $110 million. (Adjusted for inflation, that’s $148 million and $196 million in today’s dollars.)

Not only can female filmmakers make movies that show a different side of men, but they also make movies that show different aspects of women. Penny Marshall’s “A League of Their Own” (1992), about the All-American Girls Baseball Leagues during World War II, celebrates the athleticism (rather than the sexuality) of the female body. Nora Ephron’s “This is My Life,” her 1992 directorial debut about a single mom whose choice of comedy career affects her daughters, shows that career and motherhood need not be in conflict. Like Ephron’s film, Allison Anders’ “Gas Food Lodging” (also 1992) explores what happens when the children of single moms reconnect with biological fathers. Male directors were, and are not, making movies like these.

During the 1990s, almost every year brought a new evergreen made by a female filmmaker. In 1993 there were two. One was Jane Campion’s “The Piano,” a haunting allegory about a mute woman that struck a chord internationally. It earned $62 million at the box office and multiple Oscar nominations, including one for best director, making Campion the third woman to be cited in this category. The other was Nora Ephron’s “Sleepless in Seattle,” the comedic romance between two people who don’t meet in person until the last scene, which scored a $227 million box office.

“Sleepless” additionally introduced the questionable concept of the “chick flick” to a broader audience. This is a non-genre that has come to be defined as any movie that, according to the term’s proponents, women want to see and that men think they don’t want to watch — or any movie directed by a woman. The division between “chick flick” and its corollary, the “dick flick,” is a perhaps unintended consequence of target marketing, implying that movies represent a gender-linked proposition.

Almost overnight, the perception was created that movies predominantly featuring women, or “women’s interests,” or directed by women would shrivel the manhood of the male moviegoer. In 1994 the head of a major studio told me, without irony or shame, that “Women on the screen means no men in the audience.” When I asked him for data to back up his claim, he said he had it, but it was proprietary.

Despite such signs of cultural and corporate sexism, the 1990s were a good time to be a female filmmaker. In 1994, Gillian Armstrong’s “Little Women” was immediately embraced as a classic. Newcomer Darnell Martin’s “I Like it Like That,” an urban comedy about a working mother juggling job, marriage, and parenthood, earned positive reviews. And Rose Troche’s “Go Fish,” the first indie comedy about girl-on-girl courtship, marked a milestone for the burgeoning genre.

The following year, 16 films by women were in U.S. release, setting another record for that era. Many of them were comedies. There was Amy Heckerling’s “Clueless,” a droll version of Jane Austen’s “Emma” set at a Beverly Hills high school. There is Betty Thomas’ “The Brady Bunch Movie,” in which the former actress sets the characters of the 1970s TV hit in the 1990s to great comic effect. Distinctly not a comedy was Kathryn Bigelow’s “Strange Days,” a science-fiction thriller about sex crimes, which lost money but became a cult favorite. At the 1996 Oscar ceremony, with “Antonia’s Line,” Dutch filmmaker Marleen Gorris became the first female filmmaker to direct the award-winning foreign film.

But apart from Bigelow and Mimi Leder, a director of episodic television who in 1997 directed “The Peacemaker” and in 1998 “Deep Impact,” female filmmakers were not making action films. For the most part women made comedies and human stories, movies with no explosions in the opening scene. Veteran filmmaker Martha Coolidge spoke for many women when she noted that the scripts the studios sent her were for comedies or family dramas. “About 90 percent of what comes my way are ten different kinds of breast cancer stories, ten kinds of divorce stories, and ten kinds of women-taking-care-of-their-fathers stories,” she said. “I do those. I care about those deeply. But one does want to do more.”

Female filmmakers were typecast in the way many actors and actresses have been, for the most part pigeonholed in family drama and comedy genres. For example, in 1997 actress Kasi Lemmons made her directorial debut with “Eve’s Bayou,” a haunting family drama, and Betty Thomas returned with the Howard Stern biopic “Private Parts.” In 1998, Ephron returned with the romantic comedy “You’ve Got Mail.” Nancy Meyers, a long-time screenwriter, made her directorial debut with the family-friendly comedy “The Parent Trap,” and Brenda Chapman, a Disney animator, was one of three directors on “Prince of Egypt,” the animated story of Moses.

In 1999, three female filmmakers made rookie features unlike anything in American movies. Two were romantic dramas about teenage sexuality, the other an imaginative Shakespeare adaptation. Sofia Coppola’s “The Virgin Suicides,” based on the novel by Jeffrey Eugenides, looked at how boys look at girls, subversively turning the female gaze on the male gaze. Kimberly Peirce’s “Boys Don’t Cry” dramatized the life story of Teena Brandon, who changed her name and gender to become Brandon Teena and fell victim to a hate crime.

Julie Taymor, the theater director who created “The Lion King” on stage, made her movie debut with “Titus,” an anachronistic version of the Shakespeare history play “Titus Andronicus,” underscoring its parallels to Italy under Mussolini.

At the end of the decade — and century — of the 11,000 filmmakers working both in television and film included in the Directors Guild of America, about 2,300 were women. While women made up 21 percent of the membership, they comprised only 9 percent of the filmmakers working in movies.

Most, including Martha Lauzen, a professor at San Diego State University and the head of the Center for the Study of Women in Film and Television, naturally assumed that in the new century the needle would move toward 50/50.

In addition to writing film reviews and essays for Truthdig, Carrie Rickey has been a film critic at The Philadelphia Inquirer and Village Voice, and an art critic at Artforum and Art in America. Rickey has taught at various institutions, including School of the Art Institute of Chicago and the University of Pennsylvania, and has appeared frequently on NPR’s “Talk of the Nation,” MSNBC, and CNN.

What Happened to the Women Directors in Hollywood? Part 4: 1984–1999 was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story. »

- Women and Hollywood

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6 Reasons Why Indiana Jones 5 Should Not Happen

16 February 2017 8:02 AM, PST | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

He’s outrun boulders; he’s ingeniously escaped danger a multitude of times from practically anything that moves; he’s drank from the Holy Grail; he’s defeated the Nazi’s, twice; he hates snakes and he always gets the girl. His name is Indiana Jones, and he’s everyone’s favorite audacious archeologist.

After three marvelous and valiant international adventures – Raiders of the Lost Ark, Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom, and Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade (and another one with a nuclear-proof refrigerator for some reason) – Disney announced early last year that there will be a fifth installment to the Indy franchise, set to be released in July 2019. The plot is unknown at this time, but rumors of a younger actor like Chris Pratt or Bradley Cooper taking up the whip and fedora were laid to rest when Harrison Ford announced that Indiana Jones veteran, Steven Spielberg, »

- Luke Parker

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The top 37 movie Lego sets you can buy right now

16 February 2017 6:23 AM, PST | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Rob Leane Feb 24, 2017

Ghostbusters, Star Wars, Jurassic World and more: it’s our rundown of the coolest Lego movie kits on the market...

There’s nothing quite like building an iconic film scene/location using colourful bricks and a little booklet of instructions. It brings the magic of the movies right into your front room, and it kills time very easily.

See related  Fargo season 2 episode 10 review: Palindrome Fargo: how to make great TV from a great film

Lego has been lovingly recreating the films we love in miniature form for years, spanning Star Wars, Harry Potter, Ghostbusters, Jurassic World and much much more. Here are 37 of our favourites...

Nb: if you click on a few of the links in this article, it supports the site. Up to you!

S.H.I.E.L.D. Helicarrier

Let’s start with an absolute beauty: this Avengers-inspired S.H.I.E.L. »

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