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Iceman (1984) Poster

(1984)

Trivia

The age of the iceman in the film was 40,000 years. About seven years after this film was made and released, a real "iceman" was discovered in the Ötztal Alps in 1991. Named 'Ötzi the Iceman', the real-life iceman had pollen found in his stomach just like the iceman in this film.
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The picture was part of a 1980s cycle of prehistoric man movies. The films included Caveman (1981), Cavegirl (1985), Hundra (1983), Iceman (1984), Ghost Warrior (1985), Missing Link (1988), Altered States (1980), Luggage of the Gods! (1983), Quest for Fire [Quest for Fire (1981)] and The Clan of the Cave Bear (1986).
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The name for the type environmentally-controlled enclosure that the iceman lived in is a 'Vivarium'. They are usually used for doing research on animals or plants.
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Iceman was a project linked to director Norman Jewison for several years throughout the 1970s. It ultimately emerged under Fred Schepisi but Jewison was still attached as producer.
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Director Fred Schepisi was fired by the studio and producer Daniel Melnick after Schepisi personally agreed to shoot "the original ending" from the original script as intended. However, Schepisi did not do this and was immediately let go.
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Bruce Smeaton's score is not what was originally intended for the film. The score in the film is mainly needle drop tracks for most scenes. The score was recorded with 130 piece Hollywood Symphony Orchestra and was meant to have a fuller sound. The reason for this was because Director Fred Schepisi, who was fired and then brought back onto the project for post-production tampered with the film after it was locked. He'd shifted around dialog, scenes and such. According to Smeaton, "He'd (Schepisi) gone in and made 28 minor changes to the film just as we (Smeaton, Music Editor Jim Henrikson and Music Engineer Dan Wallin along with the Hollywood Symphony) were preparing to go into Glen Glenn Sound with 130 piece orchestra. The music wasn't fitting the scenes they were intended for. Fred (Schepisi) never showed up." Smeaton had to then cancel the sessions and edit down his music from what had they originally had been intended for. Smeaton admits to having regretted working with Schepisi and their subsequent film, Roxanne (1987) starring Steve Martin would be their last project together. Schepisi would have the late Jerry Goldsmith as his composer of choice during the 1990's.
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Director Fred Schepisi became attached to the project when his editor from Barbarosa (1982) Don Zimmerman, who was working on the film but does not feature in the film's credits, contacted him. Schepisi begged producer Norman Jewison to let him direct the picture. During audience testing, Jewison mandated a number of scenes to be cut, material that Schepisi would have preferred to have stayed.
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The name of the song that the iceman sings with anthropologist Dr Shepherd (Timothy Hutton) was Neil Young's "Heart of Gold".
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This movie's director Fred Schepisi has said of this film: "Iceman is a way of looking at us. There is wonder in looking at someone who is really us from the beginning... I thought this film could have been, as novelist Vladimir Nabokov observed, 'the precision of poetry and the intuition of science."
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The film both opens and ends with a title card quotation from an Inuit Legend that reads: "I, who was born to die shall live. That the world of animals and the world of men may come together, I shall live."
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One of the film's main movie posters had a long preamble that read: "HE'S 40,000 YEARS OLD. Deep within an Arctic glacier they found him, preserved by a miracle of nature, brought back to life by a miracle of science. Now medical science wants to exploit him in the name of research. One man wants to stop them...in the name of humanity. But he'll need more than a miracle to survive...he'll need a friend".
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The name given to the iceman was Charlie. He was called such because of a gibberish vocalization by him that sounded like "Charuu".
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