A black revolutionary group kidnaps a couple of young white women in a southern African state in the 1970s. They ask for a specific female reporter to interview them. She arrives and decides to stay with them until the girls are released.

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Cast

Cast overview:
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Lisa Ford
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Ramon
Siegfried Rauch ...
Joe
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Program Controller
Belinda Mayne ...
Ann Barraclough
Ken Gampu ...
Matari (Eddie Nkoya)
Helen Cherry ...
Mrs. Barraclough
...
Mr. Barraclough
Deidre Bates ...
Barbara Fenton
Graham Armitage ...
Don
Peter van Dissel ...
Fowler
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A black revolutionary group kidnaps a couple of young white women in a southern African state in the 1970s. They ask for a specific female reporter to interview them. She arrives and decides to stay with them until the girls are released.

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terrorist | See All (1) »

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Adventure

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1980 (West Germany)  »

Also Known As:

Die Rebellen  »

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When A News Story Is Yet Unborn, Might A Censor Re-create It?
11 August 2007 | by (Mountain Mesa, California) – See all my reviews

This politically tinged melodrama, filmed in South Africa prior to that benighted nation's collapse into social anarchy, is plagued by a jumbled production effort, unfortunate in the event as a good deal of meritorious enterprise is contained within its essential design that depicts various modes of manipulation utilized by purveyors of public media during the process of creating a newsworthy event. Broadcast journalist Lisa Ford (Gayle Hunnicut), in tandem with cameraman Joe (Siegfried Rauch), journeys to a fanciful southern African nation wherein a " People's Brigade" guerrilla group, led by one "Matari" (Destroyer), played by Ken Gampu, has abducted two young women as hostages for the purpose of attracting attention to the cause of the rebels, but when Lisa and Joe meet Matari, she finds that he is a former acquaintance, Eddie Ancona, with whom she had shared classes at Oxford, although Lisa's pleasant discovery is tainted when she and Joe become additional hostages for utilization as propaganda, a circumstance determined by the Brigade's number two in command, zealous Cuban adviser Ramon (James Faulkner). Installments of Lisa and Joe's exploits are regularly being dispatched to London where their filmed material, meant to be preachment, is being cut and redesigned by their British network's Programs Controller (Trevor Howard), along with assistant Don (Graham Armitage), as the Controller ponders "what kind of program I'm making". Events on the ground in Africa become increasingly violent as Materi realises, in short order, that corruption within the freshly autonomous nation's "Northern Territory" has not been moderated while under black rule. Lisa and Joe are also faced with having to select those types of political activities they will be shooting, also a form of censorship, while one of the film's many continuity flaws results from a lack of explanation as to the process used in transmitting their footage to England. One of the kidnapped women, Ann Belinda Mayne), is apparently a perfect match for the sullen but charismatic Ramon, and potent effects from the Stockholm Syndrome (when hostages become sympathetic toward the actions and beliefs of their captors) come to be highly significant components of the screenplay, actually conveying the film's largest emotional wallop, while girdling together the narrative. Faulkner, who also produces here, handily gathers in the acting laurels. However, a heavily edited final version, in ironic juxtaposition with the screenplay, leaves a surfeit of gaps in logic and raises hob with the largely outdoor compositions of expert cinematographer Vincent Cox. Notwithstanding its many flaws, this picture will be consistently interesting to many viewers.


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