6.8/10
8,939
53 user 22 critic

The Falcon and the Snowman (1985)

The true story of a disillusioned military contractor employee and his drug pusher childhood friend who became walk-in spies for the Soviet Union.

Director:

Writers:

(book),
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ON DISC
1 nomination. See more awards »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
...
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Mr. Charlie Boyce
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Mrs. Boyce
Rob Reed ...
Boyce Child
Rob Newell ...
Boyce Child
Karen West ...
Boyce Child
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Boyce Child (as Arturo Comacho)
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Boyce Child
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Dr. Lee
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Mrs. Lee
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David Lee
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Gene
Mady Kaplan ...
Laurie
...
Larry Rogers
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Storyline

The true story of Christopher Boyce, a young All-American man whose job as a guard for sensitive documents shatters his faith in his country and leads him to a sometimes comic, sometimes chilling sideline as a spy for the Soviets, aided by his scruffy buddy, Daulton; it can't last, though, and the consequences are tremendous for Boyce and his family. Written by Dan Hartung <dhartung@mcs.com>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Plot Keywords:

drugs | soviet union | spy | cia | embassy | See All (52) »

Taglines:

A true story of friendship and espionage [UK Video] See more »


Certificate:

R | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
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Details

Country:

|

Language:

Release Date:

8 February 1985 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

A Traição do Falcão  »

Box Office

Budget:

$12,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend:

$2,358,846 (USA) (27 January 1985)

Gross:

$17,100,000 (USA)
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Company Credits

Production Co:

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Sean Penn went to Mexico and sneaked into the Russian embassy as research for his role as Andrew Daulton Lee. See more »

Goofs

A Russian addresses Daulton as "Comrade Lee." The title "comrade" was reserved for fellow Soviets, especially Communist Party members. No ordinary non-communist foreigner would ever have been called "comrade," but rather "Mr." See more »

Quotes

Daulton Lee: Let me ask you now. These, these clothing. Would this be considered formal clothing for your country? Is this the average garb?
Nigerian diplomat: It's, er, garbage.
See more »

Connections

Referenced in Bully (2001) See more »

Soundtracks

THIS IS NOT AMERICA
Written by David Bowie, Pat Metheny and Lyle Mays
Performed by David Bowie
See more »

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User Reviews

Obscure classic from the eighties
5 December 2004 | by (Canada) – See all my reviews

I was too young in 1985 to appreciate a movie like this, but I watched it recently and thought it was quite an achievement. Everything about it hit the mark, without anything cheap or exploitive. The Snowman was a hilarious character for all his contradictions and brassiness.

The movie nicely recalls the cold war, when the Soviets were busy beavers trying to infiltrate governments and media institutions. The Falcon is shocked to learn the United States is using the CIA to block the Communist threat, and decides to become a traitor to his own country.

In too many films today, the writer loves one side and hates the other, so you get a dishonest film. In this film, the writer doesn't portray any of the characters as anything other than humans with their own beliefs, goals and foibles. That I find truly refreshing.

The movie is mostly accurate, from what I have read of the real event. There are a few notable exceptions where truth diverges from the movie, however. After quitting TRW, Christopher Boyce (AKA the Falcon) planned to learn Russian and earning a political major, and then returning to espionage for the Russians (the movie says the opposite). It makes you wonder how far he would have gotten, and how many other Christopher Boyce's there were during the cold war. In real life, Boyce and his lawyer tried to blame *everything* on the Andrew Lee (the Snowman), even saying Lee forced him into it. The Falcon escaped prison for an 18 month period before being recaptured. He was released from prison in 2003. Andrew Lee was paroled in 1998.


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