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Breakin' (1984) Poster

(1984)

Trivia

In the first "street dancing" scene (the one in which Kelly accompanies Ozone and Turbo to the beach), the audience watching the dancing is comprised of surfers and beach bums. In said audience, we see a man in a black singlet clapping with the music. This man is Jean-Claude Van Damme in his first on-screen appearance. According to Van Damme, he tried hard to draw attention to himself by jumping in the air and doing flips but they were not included in the film.
Alfredo Quinones and Michael Chambers admitted during documentary Electric Boogaloo: The Wild, Untold Story of Cannon Films (2014) that they resented and didn't accept Lucinda Dickey as part of their group. Dickey also stated that some of the dialog between her and Quinones "rang true" in terms of her being the outsider during the production.
First feature film of rapper Ice-T - two of his early instrumental rap songs were used (Tibetan Jam and Reckless); the producers later used Tibetan Jam in the film Missing in Action (1984) where it was used as background music.
This was Cannon Films most financially successful movie as distributor.
Alfredo Quinones resented working with Lucinda Dickey because of her physical abilities. Dickey was a gymnast.
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According to Lucinda Dickey, Adolfo Quinones would often try to show her up and make her feel intimidated because of her dancing ability and their clashes within the film rang true with his personal resentment for her which was also shared by their co-star Michael Chambers.
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The idea for the film came from Menahem Golan's daughter who one day while at the beach saw a group of break dancers performing before a crowd.
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Lela Rochon, Adolfo Quinones (Ozone)'s wife can be seen during the opening credits.
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Because of the films' success, Menahem Golan immediately green-lit the sequel, Breakin' 2: Electric Boogaloo (1984) which would be released late in the year.
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Adolfo Quinones, Michael Chambers and Timothy Solomon had featured on the video for "I Feel for You" by Chaka Khan, filmed before this movie went into production.
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Michael and Adolfo can briefly be seen separately dancing in the street and fire escape in the music video for Billy Joel's "Matter of Trust".
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This film was the first of the two break dancing films that were released in 1984 to open first. The other film was Orion Films' Beat Street (1984).
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In a race to beat Orion Pictures to release the first film about the break dancing movement, all the scenes that were shot and ended up in the film is virtually everything that studio was able to edit together and release because of the impending release date and tight post-production schedule. The film was a financial and critical success.
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Michael Chambers called this "the Enter the Dragon (1973) of hip-hop".
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Adolfo Quinones compared his and Michael Chambers' roles to Dean Martin and Jerry Lewis.
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Adolfo Quinones believed that if the film flopped, we wouldn't have hip-hop as we know it today.
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On the documentary Electric Boogaloo: The Wild, Untold Story of Cannon Films (2014), Adolfo Quinones claimed that the film did what the United Nations couldn't do in bringing people together.
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Lucinda Dickey got the female lead in this film after working with director Sam Firstenberg on Ninja III: The Domination (1984), but this was rushed through post-production and hit cinemas first.
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Though the end credits never reveal it, Ozone and Turbo's real names are Orlando and Tony, respectively.
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One of three films that Lucinda Dickey would go onto star for the studio which included the sequels, Breakin' 2: Electric Boogaloo (1984) and Ninja III: The Domination (1984).
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Breakdance was created by African Americans in 1971. However by 1978, it was losing its popularity with Blacks. Puerto Rican kids picked it up and breathed new life into it.
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Jean Claude Van Damme is pictured in the background of the opening scene while they are breakdancing on the beach. He is in the black workout spandex outfit clapping to the beat.
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During the bar fight scene, you can see a promotional banner for Hoyt Axton.
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The shirtless dancer with black shorts and black hair dancing next to Jean Claude Van Damme is Van Damme's longtime friend and actor Michel Qissi. Michel would go on to play Jean Claude's rival in "Kickboxer" as the legendary Tong Po.
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