Edit
Beverly Hills Cop (1984) Poster

Trivia

Jump to: Spoilers (6)
Eddie Murphy, John Ashton, and Judge Reinhold improvised most of their comic lines. Literally hundreds of takes were ruined by cast members, actors, or the director laughing during shooting. During the "super-cops" monologue, Ashton is pinching his face hard and looking down in apparent frustration. He is actually laughing. Reinhold put his hand in his pocket and pinched his thigh really hard, trying to prevent himself from laughing.
To cast the roles of Rosewood and Taggart, the director paired up various finalists and asked them to do some improvisation to get a feel for their chemistry. He paired up Judge Reinhold and John Ashton and gave them the following direction: "You are a middle-aged couple, married for years. You are having a conversation on an average evening." Judge Reinhold immediately picked up a nearby magazine and the two improvised the "5 pounds of red meat in his bowels" bit almost exactly as it eventually appeared in the movie.
During his tirade at the Beverly Palms Hotel, Axel pretends to be writing an article called "Michael Jackson: Sitting on Top of the World" for Rolling Stone magazine. In real life, Playboy ran an article called "Eddie Murphy: Sitting on Top of the World."
Axel Foley's T-shirt is from Mumford, a real-life Detroit-area school one of the filmmakers attended. When the film came out, the school got orders for the shirts from customers all over the world.
Police Chief Hubbard walks into his first scene carrying some rolled-up sheets of paper. It's actually one of many reworked scripts, which he received to memorize and rehearse only minutes before shooting started.
Originally, two men were supposed to be working in the art gallery scenes. When the director heard Bronson Pinchot's Serge impersonation, he thought it was so hysterical that he scaled back the other part to give Pinchot more screen time. The second actor shows up briefly, with his shirt collar open too wide, and Serge comments on it.
Gilbert R. Hill, a real-life Detroit Police Department Homicide Detective, played Inspector Todd. Hill later served as President of the Detroit City Council.
Bronson Pinchot got Serge's accent and mannerisms from a crew member he worked with on an earlier project. The crew member always said, "Don't be stupid."
Eddie Murphy became very tired while filming the police station sequences. The crew offered him coffee, but he refused to drink it because he refuses to take drugs of any kind. Eventually, Murphy relented and took small sips of coffee to stay awake. Murphy became very energized and ad-libbed the "super-cops" monologue.
Axel Foley was originally going to be played by Sylvester Stallone or Mickey Rourke. Stallone left the project and used some of his script ideas to make Cobra (1986). Harrison Ford, Michael Keaton, Arnold Schwarzenegger, Robert De Niro, Al Pacino, Richard Pryor, and James Caan were also considered for the role.
The movie was written for Sylvester Stallone, with the character of Michael Tandino as his brother, and Jenny Summers as his love interest.
The shooting script was literally pasted together from the many scripts written for the project over the years. When they were stuck, Eddie Murphy would improvise dialog or create a scene.
Trying to find Foley and Rosewood, the LAPD use a "satellite tracking system" At the time it was, made up to advance the plot. It was invented later, an ancestor of the modern-day Global Positioning System (GPS).
According to Steven Berkoff in a UK newspaper interview, Sylvester Stallone quit the film because of disagreements about the orange juice for his trailer.
"Nasty Girl," which plays during the strip club scene, was recommended by the real-life stripper hired for the scene.
The city hall building in the film is the real-life Beverly Hills City Hall. At the time, the exterior was very run-down and the plants were dying. The film crew cleaned it up and put in new plants so it would look better on film.
After Martin Brest was fired from WarGames (1983), his second directing job, the industry thought he was damaged goods. Don Simpson and Jerry Bruckheimer disagreed, and the two Paramount executives continually called Brest and asked him to direct this film. He kept declining, and eventually took his phone off the hook. Simpson took the hint, but Bruckheimer kept trying. Finally, Brest decided to flip a coin to make his decision.
The Axel Foley theme was done with three synthesizers: a Roland Jupiter 8, a Roland JX-3P, and a Yamaha DX-7.
This was the highest grossing R-rated film in the US until The Matrix Reloaded (2003) eclipsed it 19 years later. If inflation were taken into account, it would be the third most attended R-rated film after The Exorcist (1973) and The Godfather (1972).
Bronson Pinchot plays Serge, a gallery employee from an unnamed European country. He would later go on to play Balki on Perfect Strangers (1986), a similar character, and use a variation of his "Serge" character's signature line, "Don't be stupid!" Every time he was asked something he would reply "Of course I do, don't be ridiculous."
During the opening montage, a man waves his arms around for a small group. Acccording to the filmmaker commentary, the man had seen the filming of the truck chase that happens soon afterward, and was miming the bus spin.
Damon Wayans' film debut.
Many of the opening shots were filmed in Detroit. Martin Brest was escorted by the police, who would refuse to follow him when they thought it was too dangerous. Brest and crew soldiered on with their work, unescorted.
The first film to have a release of over 2000 theaters in the USA.
The completed movie made such an impression on Paramount executives that they committed to a sequel moments after the first private executive screening of the completed film.
Martin Scorsese was offered the chance to direct but he turned it down, saying the premise reminded him too much of Coogan's Bluff (1968).
The Chief mistakenly calls Detective Rosewood "Rosemont". In Beverly Hills Cop II (1987), Chief Lutz calls Rosewood "Roseweed".
DIRECTOR_CAMEO(Martin Brest): the clerk who checks Axel out of the hotel at the end of the movie.
In the art gallery, a large art piece contains several figures. One of the figures, a maitre' d with a chain around its neck, is modeled after director Martin Brest.
Jonathan Banks plays a killer in this movie. In a reversal of roles, in 48 Hrs. (1982), starring Eddie Murphy, he plays a police detective that gets killed, and Murphy was the criminal.
Axel Foley's pistol is a 9mm Browning P35 (known in the USA as the Browning Hi-Power), manufactured by Fabrique Nationale in Herstal, Belgium.
In its first weekend, the film took in $15,214,805, breaking The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas (1982)' previous R-rated weekend box record of $11,874,268.
Michael Eisner, who was head of Paramount Pictures, came up with the film's concept in 1975. While driving an old station wagon that he first owned in New York City, Eisner was stopped for speeding on the freeway. The police officer treated him with condescension due to the condition of his vehicle. Eisner realized how much status in Los Angeles, CA, was driven by materialism, and reportedly exchanged the station wagon for a Mercedes Benz the following day. However, he became dedicated to enshrining the event in a film about a Beverly Hills policeman. In the coming years, Eisner remained dissatisfied with potential scripts until Daniel Petrie, Jr., who had never been credited as a feature film writer, submitted his screenplay in September 1983.
8 of 9 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Steven Berkoff is said to loathe the film.
Danilo Bach completed his draft in 1977, six years prior to production.
Principal photography began on May 7,1984 with locations in Detroit and Los Angeles. The script was completed the same day filming began, and it was consistently revised based on Murphy's improvisations.
4 of 4 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
David Cronenberg was asked to direct, but turned it down.
Included among the "1001 Movies You Must See Before You Die", edited by Steven Schneider.
At 1 hour 45 minutes, this has the longest running-time of all the Beverly Hills Cop movies.
Beverly Hills did not allow filming in the streets after 10:30 p.m., so the filmmakers moved production to Pasadena, CA.
3 of 3 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The gated entrance to Victor Maitland's house was also used in the film Blind Date (1987).
A Delorean, built in Northern Ireland, is outside Victor Maitland's house.
The second time Axel and Jenny Summers sneak into the art gallery's warehouse, and Axel breaks open the crate with the coffee grounds and drugs inside, the address of the art gallery where Jenny works is written on the lid of the crate; "9994 Wilshire Blvd, Beverly Hills, CA".
8 of 19 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Steven Berkoff filmed his role in six weeks.
6 of 14 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Second unit stunts, chase scenes, and opening credits were filmed over five days in Detroit during summer 1984. The "cigarette spill-over" crash sequence was filmed on John R and Brush Streets in Highland Park. The smashed fruit truck scene was located at Michigan Avenue and 30th Street. The two-ton truck collision was shot several blocks away, on Jackson Avenue and 30th Street. Other Detroit locations included the Warehouse District, the residential area next to Wayne State University, and the Ford Motor Company assembly plant in Wayne, MI.
2 of 3 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Bronson Pinchot almost dropped out of the film due to the production delays and an impending trip to Florence, Italy. He grew restless and, despite being a virtual unknown, said that if they didn't start production, he would have to drop out.
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The Beverly Hills Police did not provide access to their headquarters, so Martin Brest and staff built a set that would look like the exact opposite of the Detroit police department, "like private security for all rich people." The set was influenced by Brest's original conceptual designs for the NORAD scenes in WarGames (1983). Brest recycled his unused work because he felt he spent too much time on it to never use it.
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
According to Christopher Hitchens, the British novelist and poet Kingsley Amis considered the film "a flawless masterpiece."
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
James Russo had a small role as a convenience-store robber in Fast Times at Ridgemont High (1982), which also starred Judge Reinhold, although here they had no scenes together.
4 of 12 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
In this movie Lisa Eilbacher plays Bronson Pinchot's boss. In 10 to Midnight (1983) she plays Charles Bronson's daughter.
5 of 32 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Axel Foley shoots with his left hand.
2 of 12 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
A brief portion of the car chase scene was filmed at West 5th Street and Normanie Avenue, one block from 511 South Mariposa Avenue, which was the location for Janie's apartment in Girls Just Want to Have Fun (1985).
0 of 4 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
This was 1984s second highest-grossing film worldwide, after Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom (1984).
0 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink

Spoilers 

The trivia items below may give away important plot points.

In one of the drafts written for Sylvester Stallone, Billy Rosewood was called "Siddons" and was killed off half-way through the script during one of the action scenes deemed "too expensive" for Paramount to produce. After Martin Brest cast Judge Reinhold and John Ashton, he decided to keep Rosewood alive.
The original finale for the Sylvester Stallone draft of the script took place at night and ended with a car chase between Victor in a Lamborghini and Axel in a turbo-boosting Pontiac GTO. Victor is ultimately killed when his car smashes into an oncoming train.
The earliest version of the script involved a cop in East L.A. who was transferred to Beverly Hills. The cop's name was Axel Elly, and the non-Beverly Hills action happened in Pittsburgh.
Body count: 7.
In the script, Axel stuffs potatoes he stole from the hotel kitchen into the tail pipe of Rosewood and Taggart's car. Due to time constraints, no kitchen scenes could be shot. A few scenes took place in the hotel lobby, so the script was re-written so Axel takes bananas from a buffet in the lobby.
3 of 4 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The mansion used in the final shootout between Foley and Maitland (the former Harold Lloyd estate in Beverly Hills) is the same mansion seen in the final shootout between Matrix and Arius in Commando (1985).
0 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink

See also

Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

Contribute to This Page