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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009

13 items from 2017


Cannes Review: ‘Claire’s Camera’ Has Seductive Energy and Low Stakes

27 May 2017 7:25 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Hong Sang-soo’s first film starring Isabelle Huppert, In Another Country, counts as one of the more lightweight entries in the Korean auteur’s oeuvre. Compare it to Claire’s Camera, their second collaboration, and it suddenly looks like Inland Empire. That’s not to say Claire’s Camera is bad or unenjoyable. It has plenty of the charm characteristic of Hong’s cinema, and there are far worse ways to spend 69 minutes than in the company of his characters as they amble through sunny Cannes idly chatting about love and life, disappointment and fulfillment. At the same time, knowing the director is capable of achieving so much more with even less – one of his greatest films, Hill of Freedom, is similarly scaled and two minutes shorter – it’s difficult not to end up frustrated by what feels like a rushed and ultimately undercooked work.

That’s no doubt due »

- Giovanni Marchini Camia

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Cannes 2017. Two Hongs Make It Right: Hong Sang-soo's "Claire's Camera" and "The Day After"

22 May 2017 10:06 PM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

There's a running joke—at least, I think it's a joke—that if you shoot part of your film in the French city of Cannes, you will automatically be selected by its film festival. Sneaky Hong Sang-soo, then, who quietly and quickly shot the short feature Claire’s Camera last year with Kim Min-hee, who was at the festival for The Handmaiden, and Isabelle Huppert, who was there with Elle. And now, this year in Cannes, here is the film. A nimble and thrifty filmmaker often directly inspired by the places he goes and the people he meets, Hong's wry and plaintive short story satirizes the film industry—raging unseen and unheard offscreen—while ennobling the magic of happenstance meetings and chance’s circuitous ironies.The film begins in a space possibly never seen in cinema: a temporary office in Cannes rented by a sales company to promote the film's they represent. »

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Cannes Film Review: ‘Claire’s Camera’

22 May 2017 10:28 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

It may be the most crowded and party-fueled event on the global film calendar, but the Cannes Film Festival can be an oddly solitary, contemplative experience for attendees outside the inner circle — a two-week suspension from real life and relationships, in which the world looks at once a little clearer and stranger through rosé-filled glasses. Hong Sangsoo has been to Cannes enough times to know this, and his lovably slender, semi-sweet character study “Claire’s Camera” deftly captures the festival’s warmly disorienting effect on its stragglers — in this case, two bright, lonely women (Isabelle Huppert and Kim Minhee) who fleetingly bond over their respective limbo states, and whose lives may or may not be subtly redirected by the gaze of a Polaroid camera.

That playful allegory for the restorative powers of cinema lends but a tissue’s worth of extra weight to a gossamer charmer — at just over an hour, »

- Guy Lodge

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'The Day After' ('Geu-hu'): Film Review | Cannes 2017

21 May 2017 3:31 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

Given the importance and recurrence of repetitions in South-Korean director Hong Sang-soo’s work, it almost feels appropriate he has two films in Cannes instead of just one. Out-of-competition title Claire’s Camera was shot in color and in Cannes and stars his In Another Country lead, Isabelle Huppert, alongside the filmmaker’s new muse, Kim Min-hee. For his competition entry The Day After (Geu-hu), Hong returned to Korea and reunited with Kim and Huppert's In Another Country co-star Kwon Hae-hyo, who play a newly arrived employee and her lovesick boss, respectively.

In many ways, The Day After is a quintessential Hong joint. »

- Boyd van Hoeij

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Cannes 2017 Review: Claire's Camera, Hong Sangsoo's Low-Key Cannes Holiday

21 May 2017 11:00 AM, PDT | Screen Anarchy | See recent Screen Anarchy news »

Love him or hate him, Hong Sangsoo has been remarkably consistent with his films, which both offer viewers a familiar framework and new variations on his favorite themes. His 20th work Claire's Camera debuts this weekend as a Special Screening in the Cannes Film Festival, after shooting at the festival last year. The brief (68 minutes) film reunites him with his In Another Country (2012) star Isabelle Huppert and muse Kim Min-hee for the third time (with a fourth collaboration, The Day After, also premiering at Cannes in a few days in competition). Kim Min-hee plays an employee of a Korean film sales agent who is suddenly fired by her boss for unclear reasons during the market at the Cannes Film Festival. Meanwhile Huppert plays...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...] »

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Hong Sang-soo Pays Homage To Cannes With The Rewarding ‘Claire’s Camera’ [Cannes Review]

21 May 2017 5:39 AM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

For ardent Hong Sang-soo fans, 2017 couldn’t be a more rewarding year. Not just because the South Korean filmmaker has three new films ready — the first, “On The Beach At Night Alone,” launched in Berlin — or even because two of those features are on offer at the Cannes Film Festival, “Claire’s Camera” and “The Day After.” No, it’s because a fascinating new frontier has been opened up for this prolific filmmaker: international locations in “On the Beach” and, even more prominently, “Claire’s Camera.” Oh, and Isabelle Huppert is back in Hong’s orbit for the first time since 2012’s “In Another Country” (also the director’s last Cannes Competition entry).

Continue reading Hong Sang-soo Pays Homage To Cannes With The Rewarding ‘Claire’s Camera’ [Cannes Review] at The Playlist. »

- Bradley Warren

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New Trailer & 3 Clips From Hong Sang-Soo’s ‘Claire’s Camera’ Starring Isabelle Huppert

13 May 2017 8:25 AM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

Last year, Isabelle Huppert was the toast of the Croisette thanks to her steely turn in “Elle,” and this year she’s back with “Claire’s Camera.” The film marks her second with director Hong Sang-Soo following “In Another Country,” and for the director, it’ll be his second film this year at Cannes, with “The Day After” screening in Competition.

Continue reading New Trailer & 3 Clips From Hong Sang-Soo’s ‘Claire’s Camera’ Starring Isabelle Huppert at The Playlist. »

- Kevin Jagernauth

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The Conversation: Top 3 Most Anticipated Directors’ Fortnight Picks: Denis, Baker & Dumont

2 May 2017 4:30 PM, PDT | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

Cannes 2017 is already a notable edition thanks to the festival’s inclusion of auteur helmed television entries, and (to the chagrin of some traditional minds) the appearance of Netflix properties in the main competition. But beyond these unavoidable progressions, the same kinds of regular maneuvering continues. While some auteurs locked out of the comp in 2015 have been invited back to the fold (Desplechin, Kawase) of Fremaux’s loving arms, the usual trend of displacement has crafted an unusually exciting crop of titles in the Directors’ Fortnight sidebar, as well as miscellaneous groupings of designated Special Screenings and Out of Competition slots specifically designed for auteurs who will remain part of the official program but away from the glaring inspection of competition pressures.

Edouard Waintrop scored a formidable coup with his opening film this year, Claire Denis‘ Let the Sunshine In (previously known as “Dark Sunglasses”). Denis, one of France’s finest auteurs, has been consistently overlooked by Fremaux and usually appears in competition at Venice. Alongside Denis, Waintrop snagged some Sundance titles (Bushwick, Patti Cake$) and a number of new projects from noted auteurs, like Abel Ferrara, Philippe Garrel, Sharunas Bartas, and Amos Gitai. The lineup also features a number of anticipated titles from new directors, including the sophomore film from Jonas Carpignano (A Ciambra), and some eclectic art-house genre titles (like the delicious sounding Marlina the Murderer in Four Acts from Indonesia’s Mouly Surya). Here’s our top three most anticipated from the Quinzaine:

Top 3 Quinzaine:

3. Jeannette – Dir. Bruno Dumont

Bruno Dumont, who was in the main comp last year with cannibal slapstick comedy Slack Bay, returns with an electro-pop musical on Joan of Arc set during the young girl’s developmental years, as based in part on a work by Charles Peguy.

2. The Florida ProjectSean Baker

Sean Baker returns to 35mm after 2015’s phenomenal Tangerine (famously shot on an iPhone). The American auteur’s latest stars Willem Dafoe alongside a group of newcomers in a film focusing on a six-year-old girl and her group of friends one Floridian summer as they embark on adventures while the adults contend with hard times.

1. Let the Sunshine In – Claire Denis

Inexplicably, Denis unites Juliette Binoche and Gerard Depardieu in this adaptation of Roland Barthes’ A Lover’s Discourse. And this is a comedy. Sacré bleu!

Bonus:

For this year’s select out-of-competition titles, Fremaux amassed some glittery new titles from renowned auteurs.

Top 3 Ooc:

3. Ismael’s Ghosts – Dir. Arnaud Desplechin

Desplechin is back, this time opening up the festival with Ismael’s Ghosts, starring his regular muse Mathieu Amalric as a man caught between his current wife (Charlotte Gainsbourg) and the ghost of his former lover (Marion Cotillard, who previously had a small role in 1996’s My Sex Life…).

2. Based on a True Story – Dir. Roman Polanski

Polanski returns with this intriguing sounding film written by Olivier Assayas and starring Eva Green and Emmanuelle Seigner, which details a writer who gets all wrapped up with an obsessive fan.

1. How to Talk to Girls at Parties – Dir. John Cameron Mitchell

The long awaited sci-fi film from John Cameron Mitchell stars Elle Fanning and Nicole Kidman (in one of four new projects at the festival) as aliens infiltrating London, based on a story by Neil Gaiman.

Special Events and Special Screenings:

Some of the auteurs standing out in the Special Events and Special Screenings are Abbas Kiarostami, Jane Campion, and a Virtual Reality project from Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu (Flesh and Sand), making these mini-sidebars some of the most formidable programming of the fest in years.

3. Golden Years – Andre Techine

Techine was last in Cannes with an out-of-competition screening with 2014’s In the Name of My Daughter. This year he gets a Special Screening with Golden Years, scripted alongside Cedric Anger and starring Pierre Deladonchamps (Stranger by the Lake) as a Wwi deserter who goes into hiding by posing as a woman…but after the war ends, he can’t bring himself to revert to his former identity.

2. Claire’s Camera – Dir. Hong Sangsoo

Cannes 2017 will deliver a double dose of Hong Sangsoo, who returns to the competition with The Day After, who then gets to debut Claire’s Camera as a Special Screening, which reunites him with Isabelle Huppert (who headlined his 2012 In Another Country). Sangsoo filmed this project at Cannes while the festival transpired in 2016.

1. Twin PeaksDavid Lynch

And then, there’s the return of the master. David Lynch will be premiering the first two episodes of Twin Peaks, the hotly anticipated reunion of the iconic television show twenty-five years after the end of Season 2. Along with Campion’s unveiling of her second season of Top of the Lake, this will be a rare opportunity to see (at least partially) these new works in the cinema.

The post The Conversation: Top 3 Most Anticipated Directors’ Fortnight Picks: Denis, Baker & Dumont appeared first on Ioncinema.com. »

- Nicholas Bell

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17 Shocks and Surprises from the 2017 Cannes Lineup, From ‘Twin Peaks’ to Netflix and Vr

13 April 2017 5:04 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

For such a highly anticipated event, the Cannes Film Festival tends to contain a fairly predictable lineup: The Official Selection focuses on established auteurs whose work lands a coveted slot at the flashy gathering on autopilot. That was certainly the case last year, when the 2016 edition opened with a Woody Allen movie and featured new work from the likes of Pedro Almodovar, Nicolas Winding Refn, the Dardennes brothers and Olivier Assayas.

But we live in unpredictable times, and judging by today’s announcement of the Official Selection for Cannes 2017, even the world’s most powerful festival isn’t impervious to change. This year’s Cannes is filled with surprises: television and virtual reality, some intriguing non-fiction selections, and a whole lot of unknown quantities that push the festival in fresh directions.

That’s not to say that there aren’t a few familiar names that stand out. Todd Haynes is »

- Eric Kohn

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Cannes Wish List: 50 Films That Have a Serious Shot at the 2017 Festival Lineup

31 March 2017 6:00 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

In order to make accurate predictions about the potential Cannes Film Festival lineup, it’s first important to explore which films definitely won’t make the cut. The glamorous French gathering is notorious for waiting until the last minute before locking in every slot for its Official Selection. That includes competition titles, out of competition titles, a small midnight section and the Un Certain Regard sidebar. Cannes announces the bulk of its selections in Paris on April 13, but until then, there are plenty of ways to make educated guesses. Much of the reporting surrounding the upcoming festival selection is simply lists of films expected to come out this year. However, certain movies are definitely not going to the festival for various reasons.

That’s why our own list of potentials doesn’t include “Image Et Parole,” Jean-Luc Godard’s followup to “Goodbye to Language,” which sales agent Wild Bunch now anticipates as a 2018 title. »

- Chris O'Falt, Eric Kohn, Jude Dry, Kate Erbland, Steve Greene and Zack Sharf

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Hong Sang-soo Addresses His Marriage Scandal With a Movie in ‘On the Beach at Night Alone’ — Berlinale 2017

16 February 2017 9:26 AM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

To the cadre of fans who have followed South Korean director Hong Sang-soo’s work over the years, he’s best-known for repeating different versions of the same formula: Portraits of chatty, neurotic creative types, usually filmmakers and actors, all of whom usually wind up drinking a lot of Soju and arguing through their problems with alternately funny and insightful results.

More recently, Hong has also been known as one half of a marriage scandal that dominated Korean tabloids more than any of his movies. While the media speculated, the peripatetic filmmaker quietly stuck to his one-film-a-year pace while remaining silent on the topic. Now, he has provided a response in the best terms at his disposal — with a movie. “On the Beach at Night Alone” is a fascinating sublimation of autobiography into Hong’s precise creative terms, a bittersweet character study as poignant, witty and deceptively slight as much »

- Eric Kohn

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‘Oj: Made in America’ Will Win the Best Documentary Oscar — Here’s Why

15 February 2017 8:30 AM, PST | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

As usual, the five nominees in the fiercely competitive Best Documentary Oscar category are comprised of high-profile hits and festival award-winners with the right combination of accessibility, artful filmmaking, and gravitas. However, this year’s race was marked by outside factors that included #OscarsSoWhite and the election of President Donald Trump. (Of note: Filmmakers of color directed four of the five nominated feature documentaries.)

Here’s how the documentary race shakes out:

O.J.: Made in America” (Ezra Edelman, Espn, May 20)

Scoring great reviews at the 2016 Sundance Film Festival was Ezra Edelman’s five-part movie “O.J.: Made in America,” an exhaustive, eye-opening examination of O.J. Simpson and race relations in Los Angeles from the ’60s through the Trial of the Century and beyond.

The movie swept through awards groups: it won three Cinema Eye Honors awards, took home the Ida for Best Feature, the Gotham, the National Board of Review, National Society of Film Critics, »

- Anne Thompson

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‘Oj: Made in America’ Will Win the Best Documentary Oscar — Here’s Why

15 February 2017 8:30 AM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

As usual, the five nominees in the fiercely competitive Best Documentary Oscar category are comprised of high-profile hits and festival award-winners with the right combination of accessibility, artful filmmaking, and gravitas. However, this year’s race was marked by outside factors that included #OscarsSoWhite and the election of President Donald Trump. (Of note: Filmmakers of color directed four of the five nominated feature documentaries.)

Here’s how the documentary race shakes out:

O.J.: Made in America” (Ezra Edelman, Espn, May 20)

Scoring great reviews at the 2016 Sundance Film Festival was Ezra Edelman’s five-part movie “O.J.: Made in America,” an exhaustive, eye-opening examination of O.J. Simpson and race relations in Los Angeles from the ’60s through the Trial of the Century and beyond.

The movie swept through awards groups: it won three Cinema Eye Honors awards, took home the Ida for Best Feature, the Gotham, the National Board of Review, National Society of Film Critics, »

- Anne Thompson

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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009

13 items from 2017


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