Another Country
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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009

14 items from 2016


Honours for Isabelle by Anne-Katrin Titze

4 December 2016 7:25 AM, PST | eyeforfilm.co.uk | See recent eyeforfilm.co.uk news »

Isabelle Huppert on Elle: "I never worked with a trained cat before." Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

Guillaume Nicloux's Valley Of Love, Mia Hansen-Løve's Things To Come (L’Avenir), and Paul Verhoeven's Elle have one thing in common - Isabelle Huppert. Metrograph in New York honoured Huppert by programming Catherine Breillat's Abuse Of Weakness (Abus De faiblesse); Claire Denis' White Material; Ursula Meier's Home; Hal Hartley's Amateur; Michael Haneke's The Piano Teacher and Hong Sang-soo's In Another Country.

Isabelle Huppert with Metrograph's Aliza Ma Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

Isabelle spoke with Aliza Ma at Metrograph, following the screening of In Another Country about what two of her latest films have in common:

Isabelle Huppert: In both films there is a cat. In Things To Come it's a very, very big cat. Very heavy like an elephant. In Elle [France's Foreign Language Oscar submission] is a very different cat. »

- Anne-Katrin Titze

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Oscars 2017 Documentary Shortlist Predictions: Anne Thompson Weighs In With Top Picks

21 November 2016 8:48 AM, PST | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

Many are called, few are chosen: The number of high-quality, awards-worthy documentaries seems to grow every year, but there’s still only 15 slots on the Oscar documentary shortlist. That will be announced December 5; the final five will be revealed on nominations morning, January 24. This year, 145 features were submitted.

This is the white-knuckle portion of the final campaign stretch, as documentary filmmakers and distributors hope their movies make it onto documentary branch voters’ viewing piles before they file their final grades. Those with the advantage are high-profile established hits and festival award-winners with the right combination of engaging accessibility, artful filmmaking, and gravitas.

So what’s looking like a strong bet? It’s a diverse list in more ways than one. Here are my picks for the Top 15, which are not listed in order of likelihood.

See more ‘Amanda Knox’: Why It Took Five Years to Unravel the Story of »

- Anne Thompson

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Oscars 2017 Documentary Shortlist Predictions: Anne Thompson Weighs In With Top Picks

21 November 2016 8:48 AM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Many are called, few are chosen: The number of high-quality, awards-worthy documentaries seems to grow every year, but there’s still only 15 slots on the Oscar documentary shortlist. That will be announced December 5; the final five will be revealed on nominations morning, January 24. This year, 145 features were submitted.

This is the white-knuckle portion of the final campaign stretch, as documentary filmmakers and distributors hope their movies make it onto documentary branch voters’ viewing piles before they file their final grades. Those with the advantage are high-profile established hits and festival award-winners with the right combination of engaging accessibility, artful filmmaking, and gravitas.

So what’s looking like a strong bet? It’s a diverse list in more ways than one. Here are my picks for the Top 15, which are not listed in order of likelihood.

See more ‘Amanda Knox’: Why It Took Five Years to Unravel the Story of »

- Anne Thompson

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Isabelle Huppert on How She Tackles Difficult Roles Like ‘Elle’

10 November 2016 9:45 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Whereas every other celebrity who visited the sixth-floor Variety Studio at the Toronto Film Festival arrived by elevator, Isabelle Huppert took the stairs — which says a lot about the French star. With a genuine shot at an Oscar nod this year for her daring role in Sony Pictures Classics’ “Elle,” the 63-year-old — who has more nominations for France’s top award, the César, than any other actress (15) — never takes the easy route.

While many actors run from provocative, erotic, or otherwise risqué roles, Huppert is drawn to them — from her early, sexy career turns in  “Going Places” and “Coup de torchon” to her most recent Cannes sensation, “Elle,” in which she plays the co-founder of a successful video-game company who reacts in an unexpected way after she is violently raped. At first, the character goes on with her life as if nothing had happened; then, after discovering the identity of her attacker, »

- Peter Debruge

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Isabelle Huppert on Finding Comedy in ‘Elle’ and ‘Things to Come,’ Iggy Pop, and More

9 November 2016 10:02 AM, PST | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

I have had the privilege of sitting one-on-one with many artists whose work I admire, but I’ve never been quite so uneasy before speaking with Isabelle Huppert. It’s not just someone who I’ve spent some fair amount of time observing onscreen, as well as the woman who might be our greatest living actress — it’s also someone who, by now, has almost certainly been asked just about everything, especially during an ongoing press cycle that’s been especially lengthy. It’s always my goal to ask things that haven’t been brought up before, but the combination made this especially nerve-wracking.

Until I sat down and found someone who’s as blasé as she is ubiquitous, and as open as she is intelligent. It doesn’t hurt that she’s having a banner year with Paul Verhoeven‘s Elle and Mia Hansen-Løve‘s Things to Come — two of 2016’s best films, »

- Nick Newman

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From Ava DuVernay’s ’13th’ to ‘Oj: Made in America’: Four Docs That Define Black Lives Matter

3 October 2016 11:03 AM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

There are four new documentaries that, while timed for Oscar votes, have a much bigger target audience: The American voters. These urgently topical films peel away decades of mythology, propaganda, and misinformation to reveal why so many people in this country are not only incarcerated in our thriving prison economy, but function inside prisons of misguided perception.

It’s easy to see why the New York Film Festival picked Ava DuVernay’s “13th” as its first-ever documentary opening-night film. In the year of Ferguson and Black Lives Matter, as fearful cops continue to gun down unarmed black men in the street, this must-see film will raise consciousness about how race affects the way we regard and behave toward the people around us. “13th” is a history of how white people have treated African-Americans since 1865 — when the 13th Amendment abolished slavery — and it roused the Lincoln Center crowd to multiple standing »

- Anne Thompson

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From Ava DuVernay’s ’13th’ to ‘Oj: Made in America’: Four Docs That Define Black Lives Matter

3 October 2016 11:03 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

There are four new documentaries that, while timed for Oscar votes, have a much bigger target audience: The American voters. These urgently topical films peel away decades of mythology, propaganda, and misinformation to reveal why so many people in this country are not only incarcerated in our thriving prison economy, but function inside prisons of misguided perception.

It’s easy to see why the New York Film Festival picked Ava DuVernay’s “13th” as its first-ever documentary opening-night film. In the year of Ferguson and Black Lives Matter, as fearful cops continue to gun down unarmed black men in the street, this must-see film will raise consciousness about how race affects the way we regard and behave toward the people around us. “13th” is a history of how white people have treated African-Americans since 1865 — when the 13th Amendment abolished slavery — and it roused the Lincoln Center crowd to multiple standing »

- Anne Thompson

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Hong Sang-soo: Modernist Romance

5 July 2016 7:25 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

This article was published in response to Tales of Cinema: The Films of Hong Sang-soo, a complete retrospective at New York's Museum of the Moving Image. On June 23rd, Hong Sang-soo's Golden Leopard winning Right Now, Wrong Then will receive a theatrical release from Grasshopper Film. You can also read Christopher Small and Daniel Kasman's interview with Hong Sang-soo from the Locarno Film Festival here.With her back to the camera, pencil-like frame aping the posture of a nearby lighthouse that guards the border with the sea, Isabelle Huppert’s atypical protagonist in In Another Country (2012), while dozily imagining yet another iteration of the story's romantic dynamics, becomes a typical image by Hong Sang-soo: a character whose momentary break from their own dreamy game of interchangeable personalities we are suddenly, inexplicably privy to. It’s a day-dream moment that can only be reversed by a structural shift in the story; when Anne's lover, »

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NYC Weekend Watch: ‘Femme Fatale,’ Hou Hsiao-hsien, ‘Pusher,’ Maya Deren & More

16 June 2016 6:49 PM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Since any New York cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

Metrograph

The Brian De Palma retrospective has its best weekend yet: Carlito’s Way and Raising Cain on Friday; Body Double and Femme Fatale on Saturday; and, this Sunday, Mission: Impossible, Snake Eyes, and the underseen, Paul Schrader-penned Obsession.

A program of Chuck Jones shorts plays on Saturday; Party Husband screens this Sunday.

Museum of »

- Nick Newman

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Agnès Varda Begins New Documentary; Hong Sang-soo Shooting In Cannes with Isabelle Huppert

16 May 2016 10:27 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Word of a new Agnès Varda project is hardly commonplace — it’s sometimes unclear if she’s even still working — so this tentative announcement gets more attention than most others. Said project, per Variety, is “a celebration of images, still and moving, and the way they are shown, shared and exhibited,” and likely an autobiographical celebration at that: as co-directed by the Bansky-like French photographer Jr, the picture “will focus on faces, encounters, huge images related to people and mostly the growth of an unlikely friendship between a 33 year old youngster and an 88 year old lady.” (I’ll save you the Wikipedia search and mental arithmetic by noting that, yes, Jr is 33 and Varda is 88.)

Varda is immediately forthcoming about the project, saying, “As my life draws to a close, I find myself wanting to see ever more faces, to film or photograph them, to keep them in images if not in my memory. »

- Nick Newman

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True/False Film Festival Unveils 2016 Lineup

18 February 2016 8:48 AM, PST | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

The always-imaginative programming at True/False, founded in 2004 by festival organizers David Wilson and Paul Sturtz, also includes Brian Oakes' "Jim: The James Foley Story," which won the Audience Award at Sundance and recently aired on HBO, and Heidi Ewing and Rachel Grady's portrait of legendary TV writer and producer Norman Lear, "Norman Lear: Just Another Version of You."      Read More: "Sundance Doc Audience Award Winner 'Jim: The James Foley Story' Paints Harrowing Portrait of Isis Captive" This year's theme, "Off the Trail," is inspired by "secret missions, treasure maps, personal geographies, and the virtue of being lost," as evidenced by selections "Behemoth," set in the remote grasslands of Inner Mongolia; "Another Country," a guided tour of the Australian outback, and "Michael Shannon Michael Shannon John," which seeks to locate a father who abandoned his family. »

- Matt Brennan

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Isabelle Huppert, Jeon Soo-il, Ounie Lecomte Talk About France, Korea Co-production

5 February 2016 9:00 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Paris — This year’s 16th edition of Paris Images Cinema/Industrie du Reve (Feb. 3-5) focused on relations between France and South Korea, which have intensified since the two countries signed a co-production treaty in 2007.

Key conclusions from the discussions included the different storytelling codes prevailing in France and South Korea, as well as the different financing requirements and working methods.

On Feb. 4 a series of round tables were held dedicated to different aspects of this topic, as well as a special session with French actress Isabelle Huppert, who discussed her experience of filming in South Korea for “In Another Country,” directed by Hong-Sang-soo, who had previously shot “Night and Day” in Paris in 2008.

In the round table on co-production experiences, French-Korean producer Nam Yoon-seok talked about producing in Paris “Night and Day,” which had a relatively small crew of 20 technicians. The film was shot during August 2007, and Yoon-seok explained »

- Martin Dale

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Top 100 Most Anticipated Foreign Films of 2016: #42. Hong Sang-soo’s Untitled Project

10 January 2016 2:00 PM, PST | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

Untitled Hong Sang-soo film

Director: Hong Sang-soo

Writer: Hong Sang-soo

South Korean auteur Hong Sang-soo is another perennial favorite who has amassed a significant festival circuit following over the past decade, his films often recycling the same themes and actors. Usually, there isn’t any news about his projects until they’re actually announced as being programmed at a festival (an exception being his 2012 In Another Country because it was headlined by French actress Isabelle Huppert). After winning the Golden Leopard this year at Locarno for his latest, Right Now, Wrong Then, one would assume the incredibly busy director was already working on another project. A recent interview with actress Lee Yoo-young (The Treacherous; Fatal Intuition) confirms Sang-soo wrapped another film in Autumn, 2015, starring herself and Kim Joo-hyuk.

Cast: Lee Yoo-yung, Kim Joo-Hyuk

Production Co./Producer(s): Na.

U.S. Distributor: Rights Available. Tbd (domestic/international).

Release Date: Considering »

- Nicholas Bell

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28 Authors on the Books That Changed Their Lives

5 January 2016 9:52 AM, PST | Vulture | See recent Vulture news »

The right book, it’s said, can change your life. Some books can alter perceptions of the world, or let a reader see life from a perspective they may never have considered before. Others expand the sense of what’s possible within the confines of a narrative; still others tell stories that the reader might not have ever expected to find themselves hearing. With a New Year just beginning, it’s an ideal time to seek out books that have a track record of changing your life. So we asked a number of writers across the board — from Eileen Myles to David Mitchell to Chuck Palahniuk to Alexander Chee to leading genre authors — about the books that changed their lives. Here’s what they had to say, in their own words.Chris Abani, author of The Secret History of Las Vegas and Grace Land “I was ten when I read James Baldwin’s Another Country. »

- Tobias Carroll

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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009

14 items from 2016


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