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Amadeus (1984)

The incredible story of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, told by his peer and secret rival Antonio Salieri - now confined to an insane asylum.

Director:

Writers:

(original stage play), (original screenplay)
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1,042 ( 81)

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Top Rated Movies #85 | Won 8 Oscars. Another 33 wins & 14 nominations. See more awards »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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...
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...
...
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Michael Schlumberg (2002 Director's Cut)
...
Parody Commendatore
Lisbeth Bartlett ...
Papagena (as Lisabeth Bartlett)
Barbara Bryne ...
Martin Cavina ...
Young Salieri (as Martin Cavani)
Roderick Cook ...
Milan Demjanenko ...
Karl Mozart
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Storyline

Antonio Salieri believes that Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart's music is divine and miraculous. He wishes he was himself as good a musician as Mozart so that he can praise the Lord through composing. He began his career as a devout man who believes his success and talent as a composer are God's rewards for his piety. He's also content as the respected, financially well-off, court composer of Austrian Emperor Joseph II. But he's shocked to learn that Mozart is such a vulgar creature, and can't understand why God favored Mozart to be his instrument. Salieri's envy has made him an enemy of God whose greatness was evident in Mozart. He is ready to take revenge against God and Mozart for his own musical mediocrity. Written by Khaled Salem

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

The man... The music... The madness... The murder... The motion picture... See more »


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for brief nudity | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
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Details

Official Sites:

Country:

|

Language:

| | |

Release Date:

19 September 1984 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Amadeus: The Director's Cut  »

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Box Office

Budget:

$18,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$505,276, 23 September 1984, Limited Release

Gross USA:

$51,973,029
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Production Co:

,  »
Show more on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (director's cut)

Sound Mix:

(70 mm prints)| (director's cut)| (35 mm prints)

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The musicians play on an instrument that was the forerunner to the modern piano, called the forte-piano, combining the Italian words for loud (forte) and soft (piano). This is because the instrument was the first keyboard instrument developed that could truly provide contrast between loud and soft depending on how the keys are struck by the fingers. Its popularity with the emerging European middle class is showcased in a scene in the director's cut where a wealthy family has their daughter take a lesson from Mozart. The real Mozart's piano sonatas were written with his female students in mind. It quickly outpaced the harpsichord and clavichord as a household musical instrument as well as a concert staple. The Classical Era (roughly 1750-1820) saw an end to the harpsichord being used in virtually all compositions, and the piano along with the violin becoming the chief featured instruments of concertos for solo instrument and orchestra. Also in this era, the genre of concerto was no longer a work written for orchestra without a featured solo instrument; that form of concerto was replaced by the sinfonia, later called the symphony. The forte-piano had black keys where the modern piano (fully named the pianoforte) has white keys, and white keys where the modern instrument has black. In one scene where Mr. and Mrs. Mozart are driven to a concert where Mozart is to play, six men are seen hefting the forte-piano on their shoulders through the streets of Vienna. The earlier instrument was smaller than the modern piano (with a shorter keyboard), and much lighter. It was also far less durable than its modern counterpart. Beethoven is the composer credited with helping to design a more durable instrument with a wider pitch range, leading to the instrument having to be renamed. See more »

Goofs

When the confessor is waiting to enter Salieri's door from the hallway of the asylum, there is a woman sitting with her back to him (and the camera) talking to a patient. She is wearing a red business suit jacket with obvious, 80's style, shoulder pads. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Antonio Salieri: Mozart! Mozart, forgive your assassin! I confess, I killed you...
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Crazy Credits

The producer, screenplay writer and director thank the following for their boundless assistance in our effort to present the physical authenticity and aura you have seen and felt in "Amadeus": -The National Theatre of Czechoslovakia and Prague's Tyl Theatre management for allowing us to film in the Tyl sequences from the operas: "Abduction from the Seraglio," "The Marriage of Figaro," and "Don Giovanni." It was actually in this magnificently preserved theatre that Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart conducted the premiere performance of "Don Giovanni" on October 29, 1787. -His Eminence Cardinal Frantisek Tomasek for his kindness in permitting us to use his beautiful residence headquarters in Prague as the Emperor's palace. -The Barrandov Studios and CS Filmexport for their help in filming "Amadeus" in Prague and in castles and palaces throughout Czechoslovakia. See more »

Connections

Referenced in The Oprah Winfrey Show: Summer Movie Reviews (1996) See more »

Soundtracks

Axur, Re d'Ormus: Finale
(1788) (uncredited)
Music by Antonio Salieri
Libretto by Lorenzo da Ponte
Performed by The Academy of St. Martin-in-the-Fields (as Academy of St Martin In The Fields)
Conducted by Neville Marriner
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

See more (Spoiler Alert!) »

User Reviews

Amadeus
15 April 2003 | by See all my reviews

When the two worlds of Antonio Salieri and Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart collide in Milos Forman's Amadeus, it is anything but a symphony. As the court composer of the Emperor of Austria, all Salieri desires are fame and recognition as a composer; it is all he had wanted his whole life. When he learns that Mozart, whose name he had known as long as he can remember, is going to come to the court to play, Salieri cannot wait to meet the outstanding and righteous man that he knows he must be. However, when Salieri learns that Mozart is a young, crude, and unrefined young man, endowed with all the talent and ability that he ever wanted and strived for, it plants a seed of jealousy that soon grows into bitter resentment and hatred, not only for Mozart, but also towards God. Salieri's desire to get rid of him is seemingly boundless as he plots and schemes for Mozart's demise. It is no wonder why Amadeus won eight Academy Awards, including Best Picture, with 5-Star performances by F. Murry Abraham as Antonio Salieri and Tom Hulce as Mozart. Amadeus is an emotionally charged and tragic piece, a story of the life of one of the world's most famous composers, as seen through the eyes of his worst enemy.


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