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Robin Of Sherwood: looking back at a modern TV classic

Llinos Cathryn Thomas Aug 5, 2016

Thirty years since it ended, we revisit much-loved 80s historical fantasy series Robin Of Sherwood...

The Robin Hood legend has been retold in countless ways, but one of the most memorable of modern times is Richard Carpenter’s hugely influential 1980s imagining, telling the story of Sherwood’s band of outlaws with a combination of realism and luminous fantasy with its roots in British folklore.

Made by Htv in association with production company Goldcrest Films (which was also behind Chariots Of Fire and Gandhi), its 26 episodes ran on ITV from 1984 to 1986, garnering a positive critical reception and inspiring a fan following that’s still enthusiastically active today.

Much of the success of the show was down to the spot-on casting and the chemistry between the performers. Michael Praed’s charismatic-yet-otherworldly presence as Robin was the perfect match for the show’s aesthetic, and the more down-to-earth Little John,
See full article at Den of Geek »

Tommy's Honour review – well-pitched performances bring golf biopic up to par

This story of teenage golf sensation ‘Young’ Tom Morris is a decent rather than dazzling film to open the Edinburgh film festival, kept on course Peter Mullan and Jack Lowden as father and son

Jason Connery – son of Sean – is still probably best known for his mid-1980s stint in the TV series Robin of Sherwood, but he’s been directing features for a few years now: mostly obscure sci-fi and thrillers, but this, his fifth, has got a modicum of wider interest to it. Tommy’s Honour is a conventional, old-fashioned, biopic of early golf champ “Young” Tom Morris, who remains the youngest ever winner of the British Open as a 17-year-old in 1868, and who succumbed to an appallingly early death just seven years later.

Morris is portrayed with enthusiasm and no little charm by Jack Lowden, who channels a sort of bristling young lion challenge towards his father,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Review: Jeff Wayne's Musical Verson of the War of the Worlds - West End

I’ve been a huge fan of Jeff Wayne’s Musical Version of the War of the Worlds ever since one of my junior school teachers decided to play it to us over four lessons way back in 1978, encouraging us to discuss it among the class and to create our own words and pictures as a result. I’d never heard anything quite like it, and frankly, there’s never really been anything quite like it since, in terms of a completely immersive musical experience that was groundbreaking at the time and still sounds as fresh and vital today as it did 38 years ago.

When Wayne finally achieved his dream of bringing his magnum opus to life on the stage in 2006, I was there at the inaugural performance at London’s Royal Albert Hall to witness him conducting a live band and orchestra along with a breathtaking visual show that featured video walls,
See full article at Shadowlocked »

Anthony Horowitz webchat – post your questions now

The writer was online to answer questions about James Bond, Sherlock Holmes, Foyle’s War and whether he is ever mistaken for David Walliams (he’s not)

2.06pm GMT

And finally, philipphilip99 asks:

Have you ever given up on a novel? If so, why?

Great last question. Generally I don't start a book until I know everything about it, including the fact that it's probably worth writing. Frankly, life's too short to write ten or twenty thousand words and then throw them away. I'm currently writing a new novel, Magpie Murders, and I'm 90,000 words in. In fact, I'm off now to write the next chapter (my biggest fear being that I'll be run over by a bus on the way home).

Can I thank everyone for these great questions - it's been a real pleasure doing this with the Guardian. And thanks also to the fastest typist on the planet
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Review: 'Doctor Who' Season 9 Episode 5 'The Girl Who Died' Keeps a Good Thing Going

  • Indiewire
Review: 'Doctor Who' Season 9 Episode 5 'The Girl Who Died' Keeps a Good Thing Going
Oh, "Doctor Who." Five stellar episodes in a row -- it's like last year's damp squib of a season never happened. "The Girl Who Lived" is the show doing historical episodes as they're meant to be done. It's like "Fires of Pompeii," "Robin of Sherwood" and classic Third Doctor adventure "The Time Warrior" all mixed into one -- literally -- electrifying episode. Read More: Review: 'Doctor Who' Season 9 Episode 4, 'Before the Flood,' Gets Meta and Heavy Metal Doctor Hell YesIt's two Doctors for the price of one this episode, as we get a flashback and he finally realises why he regenerated as a slightly older version of Marcus Aurelius from The Fires of Pompeii -- as a reminder that sometimes he can change fixed points in time. It's an underwhelming reason, but it's nice to get a quick glimpse of Catherine Tate's much-missed Donna. The nature
See full article at Indiewire »

Review: 'Doctor Who' Season 9 Episode 5 'The Girl Who Died' Keeps a Good Thing Going

Review: 'Doctor Who' Season 9 Episode 5 'The Girl Who Died' Keeps a Good Thing Going
Oh, "Doctor Who." Five stellar episodes in a row -- it's like last year's damp squib of a season never happened. "The Girl Who Lived" is the show doing historical episodes as they're meant to be done. It's like "Fires of Pompeii," "Robin of Sherwood" and classic Third Doctor adventure "The Time Warrior" all mixed into one -- literally -- electrifying episode. Read More: Review: 'Doctor Who' Season 9 Episode 4, 'Before the Flood,' Gets Meta and Heavy Metal Doctor Hell YesIt's two Doctors for the price of one this episode, as we get a flashback and he finally realises why he regenerated as a slightly older version of Marcus Aurelius from The Fires of Pompeii -- as a reminder that sometimes he can change fixed points in time. It's an underwhelming reason, but it's nice to get a quick glimpse of Catherine Tate's much-missed Donna. The nature
See full article at Indiewire Television »

Eve Hewson to play Maid Marian opposite Taron Egerton in Robin Hood: Origins

The film may have been delayed to accommodate Kingsman: The Secret Service 2, but Lionsgate is pressing ahead with casting on Robin Hood: Origins, with Eve Hewson (The Knick, Bridge of Spies) signing on to play Maid Marian alongside Taron Egerton’s Robin of Sherwood.

Deadline reports that Hewson was one of over 100 actresses considered for the part, and won the role ahead of a shortlist that includes Gaite Jansen (Supernova), Lucy Fry (Vampire Academy) and Gugu Mbatha-Raw (Belle).

The film is being directed by Otto Bathurst (Peaky Blinders) from a script by Joby Harold (Knights of the Round Table: King Arthur), and sees Robin returning from The Crusades to find Sherwood Forest rife with crime and corruption, forming a band of outlaws to take matters into his own hands.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

10 cult ITV classics that everyone forgets - from Terrahawks to the Second Coming

ITV has hit a mighty milestone - first launched on September 22, 1955, the home of The X Factor, Downton Abbey and more is 60 years old today.

In its six decades, ITV has produced some of the biggest, best and most memorable TV shows in British broadcasting history.

But while everyone else is talking up Gladiators, Coronation Street and Blind Date, we wanted to take this opportunity to celebrate a few of the channel's less celebrated gems.

1. The Krypton Factor (1977-1995)

"Television's Toughest Quiz!" boomed the announcer back when the show launched in 1977. And even almost forty years later, nothing has quite matched Granada's brutal search for a UK superperson since.

Resembling a cross between a byzantine parlour game and a Soviet-era punishment for shoplifting, each week saw four more contestants subjected to a variety of cruel and unusual tests – from terrifying memory tests to landing a Boeing 747 (albeit on a simulator).

But worst of all?
See full article at Digital Spy - TV news »

10 cult ITV classics that everyone forgets - from Terrahawks to the Second Coming

ITV has hit a mighty milestone - first launched on September 22, 1955, the home of The X Factor, Downton Abbey and more is 60 years old today.

In its six decades, ITV has produced some of the biggest, best and most memorable TV shows in British broadcasting history.

But while everyone else is talking up Gladiators, Coronation Street and Blind Date, we wanted to take this opportunity to celebrate a few of the channel's less celebrated gems.

1. The Krypton Factor (1977-1995)

"Television's Toughest Quiz!" boomed the announcer back when the show launched in 1977. And even almost forty years later, nothing has quite matched Granada's brutal search for a UK superperson since.

Resembling a cross between a byzantine parlour game and a Soviet-era punishment for shoplifting, each week saw four more contestants subjected to a variety of cruel and unusual tests – from terrifying memory tests to landing a Boeing 747 (albeit on a simulator).

But worst of all?
See full article at Digital Spy - TV news »

Robin of Sherwood's radio comeback with Ray Winstone launches a crowdfunding campaign

A crowdfunding campaign to bring back Robin of Sherwood as an audio special will launch today (September 15).

The classic 1980s TV series will return in early 2016 as a one-off radio adventure titled The Knight of the Apocalypse, with the original cast also returning.

Fans of the show will receive exclusive goodies if they donate towards the production costs via Indiegogo.

Producer Simon Barnard said: "By contributing to our Indiegogo campaign, you'll have access to a little piece of Robin of Sherwood history: signed artwork and scripts, a limited edition box set, and specially made Knights of the Apocalypse merchandise.

"You'll also be able to come to the London premiere in 2016, and meet some of the cast! And best of all, you can do this safe in the knowledge that every penny we make in profit will go to Robin of Sherwood creator Richard Carpenter's favourite charities, the British Red
See full article at Digital Spy - TV news »

1980s TV series Robin of Sherwood is returning as a radio play

Cult 1980s TV show Robin of Sherwood is returning with a new episode - in the form of a radio play.

Written by Richard Carpenter, the show ran for three series between 1984 and 1986.

Now, in tribute to Carpenter - who died in 2012 - 'The Knights of the Apocalypse' will be recorded and aired in early 2016, with all proceeds going to charity.

Carpenter wrote the episode following the end of the TV series, and nothing was ever done with it until now.

The new instalment sees the return of original cast members including Ray Winstone, Jason Connery, Clive Mantle, Judi Trott and Nikolas Grace.

Connery, who played Robin, said of the new radio play: "My time in Sherwood was spent working with wonderful actors who became lifelong friends, and behind it all was Richard 'Kip' Carpenter's brilliant writing, whose scripts we brought to life. After many false dawns, I can finally
See full article at Digital Spy - TV news »

Reviews: Doctor Who Series 8 Soundtrack

Growing up a band nerd in school, I get pretty excited about music. So when a new Doctor Who soundtrack is released, I get fairly giddy. Murray Gold has always found a way to musically enhance any of The Doctor's stories, like John Williams did with the Star Wars films. However, as much as it pains me to say it, the soundtrack for Series 8 left me feeling underwhelmed. Perhaps even a little disappointed. Where Gold once had stand out themes for characters, brilliant action numbers and heart tugging emotional suites, here we get three disks of little that makes for repeated listening.

It's not that the music in and of itself isn't good. We do start the experience off with the newly revamped Main Theme, which sounds very similar to the version from the early eighties. From there we are given a pretty run of the mill musical landscape. Trilling violins,
See full article at Shadowlocked »

Doctor Who complete reviews: Robot of Sherwood

If you grew up in the 1980s, then no doubt you'll remember ITV's very own take on the Robin Hood legend. Robin Of Sherwood would face the formidable presence of the Sheriff of Nottingham on a weekly basis, and would do so while flicking his girly locks from side to side to the ethereal dulcet tones of Clannad.

Robin Of Sherwood went out between 1984 and 1986, which was to be one of Doctor Who's best forgotten periods of history. As the old saying goes, civilisations rise and civilisations fall, and in the mid 1980s, Doctor Who's cosy little world was in danger of crumbling. Some of the fans were turning up their noses at John Nathan Turner's stewardship, while the evil big shots at the BBC were rubbing their hands in glee at the 18-month hiatus. About 30 years later, the presence of Robin Hood again caused dissension in the ranks.
See full article at Shadowlocked »

BBC edits Doctor Who beheading scene after Islamic State journalist killings

Fight featuring Robin Hood removed out of respect to families of James Foley and Steven Sotloff

The BBC has edited out a beheading from a fight scene in this weekends episode of Doctor Who, featuring Robin Hood, as a mark of respect following the murder of two Us journalists by Islamic State.

In Saturdays third episode of the current Doctor Who series the Time Lord turns up in medieval England and encounters Robin of Sherwood.

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Wamg’s Conversation With Mark Ryan (Lockdown) From Transformers: Age Of Extinction

Director Michael Bay’s Transformers: Age Of Extinction opens in theaters this Friday, June 27th and it’s poised to have a mega-opening weekend.

Here’s what the early reviews are saying about the return of the colossal titans:

Variety -

“As the sine qua non of the franchise, it’s the robots — endowed here with character-rich physicality and almost human-scaled facial features — who give the film its emotional heft. Optimus Prime’s charismatic leadership of his team, as well as his unwavering compassion for the humans, again makes him the movie’s moral anchor. Drift, with his samurai getup and Watanabe’s dignified line readings, strikes a neat balance with Goodman’s cigar-chewing, wisecracking Hound. Still, the character most likely to be beloved by audiences, especially tykes, remains Bumblebee.”

HitFix -

“The giant scale action in this one is amazingly staged once again. There are few filmmakers alive who
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

John Goodman and Ken Watanabe To Voice Two New Autobots In Transformers: Age Of Extinction; Download The Movie App

Director Michael Bay has tapped John Goodman and Ken Watanabe to voice two all new Autobots in his highly anticipated film Transformers: Age Of Extinction, the fourth film in the global blockbuster franchise from Paramount Pictures.

Goodman and Watanabe will join legendary voice actors Peter Cullen and Frank Welker.

Goodman will play Autobot Hound, Watanabe will play Drift, while Cullen reprises his role as the voice of Optimus Prime, and Welker takes on another new character, Galvatron.

“I am pleased to welcome two gifted and versatile actors, John Goodman and Ken Watanabe, to the world of Transformers,” said Bay. “And to reteam with Peter and Frank, who have brought Transformers characters alive from the beginning. I’ve been fortunate to work with some of the best voice talent in the business, and together we will introduce several exciting new robots to fans of the franchise around the world.”

Rounding out
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Looking back at The Baker Street Boys

  • Den of Geek
Feature Alex Westthorp 19 Feb 2014 - 07:00

Nostalgia ahoy! With Sherlock Holmes more popular than ever, Alex looks back at eighties children's drama, The Baker Street Boys...

The BBC's contemporary take on Arthur Conan Doyle's short stories has made Sherlock the most popular television drama series in many years. Benedict Cumberbatch has made Sherlock his own, his approach to the role as radical for the current era as the late, great Jeremy Brett's was a generation ago. Martin Freeman has banished our memories of his role as Tim Canterbury in Ricky Gervais and Stephen Merchant's The Office, with his wonderful re-assessment of Dr John Watson. The corporation is making the most of the Conan Doyle franchise. After from two rather lacklustre yuletide cases, firstly with Richard Roxburgh in 2002 then Rupert Everett in 2004; they finally have a hit on their hands. The benchmark hitherto has always been Granada Television
See full article at Den of Geek »

Lewis Collins obituary

Actor who was both heart-throb and hardman as Bodie in The Professionals

In a 1980 episode of the hit British cop show The Professionals, an ill-advised villain tries to threaten the ex-mercenary William Bodie with his snarling doberman pinscher. After a brief altercation, Bodie, all sang-froid and minimally curled lip, inquires: "Would your little dog like to chew this electric fire? Or maybe you'll just leave."

This kind of butch badinage, along with rugged good looks, helped make Lewis Collins, who played Bodie in all 57 of the show's episodes from 1977 and 1983, and who has died aged 67 after suffering from cancer, into a household name. During that time he formed one half of Britain's answer to Starsky and Hutch, a crime-fighting duo called Bodie and Doyle who worked for a shadowy criminal intelligence agency, CI5, headed by Gordon Jackson's strait-laced George Cowley. At its height, The Professionals was watched by 12 million viewers a week,
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Lewis Collins obituary

Actor who was both heart-throb and hardman as Bodie in The Professionals

In a 1980 episode of the hit British cop show The Professionals, an ill-advised villain tries to threaten the ex-mercenary William Bodie with his snarling doberman pinscher. After a brief altercation, Bodie, all sang-froid and minimally curled lip, inquires: "Would your little dog like to chew this electric fire? Or maybe you'll just leave."

This kind of butch badinage, along with rugged good looks, helped make Lewis Collins, who played Bodie in all 57 of the show's episodes from 1977 and 1983, and who has died aged 67 after suffering from cancer, into a household name. During that time he formed one half of Britain's answer to Starsky and Hutch, a crime-fighting duo called Bodie and Doyle who worked for a shadowy criminal intelligence agency, CI5, headed by Gordon Jackson's strait-laced George Cowley. At its height, The Professionals was watched by 12 million viewers a week,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Ray Winstone should learn from his own films

Complaining about being taxed too heavily for being a highly paid film star does scant justice to actor's work

It verges on comical, Ray Winstone's complaint about high tax. Wasn't he paying any attention when he was starring in Robin of Sherwood? More seriously, Winstone has also acted in films such as Nil by Mouth and Scum – brilliant examples of British social-realist cinema. He nevertheless has so little insight into the current state of this country that he reckons this is a good time to complain about being "raped" by high taxes. Not that there's ever a good time to suggest that you've been raped by anyone or anything apart from, let's see … Yes, a Rapist. Like in, say, Scum. Watch one or two of those movies you've been in, loving your work while you are being well rewarded for it, Ray, and learn something from them. The rest of us watch them,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »
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