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"Night Court"
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Reviews & Ratings for
"Night Court" More at IMDbPro »

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22 out of 25 people found the following review useful:

Sleaze done correctly. Great show.

Author: BlackJack_B (bluethunder35@hotmail.com) from Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
16 May 2002

Night Court was one of a series of great sitcoms that aired during NBC's dominance in the late 80's. The ongoing careers and lives of a judge, his lawyers, and other officials was probably the best sitcom in the line-up along with The Golden Girls.

Unlike today's sitcoms where everyone portrays Woody Allen and has "sex on the brain", only one man, ONE MAN, in the cast was thinking non-stop about sexing. John Laroquette, as Dan Fielding; Assistant DA of New York, was brilliant in portraying the sleazy, sexually-addicted hunk. He won 4 Emmys for his portrayal (more then anyone else currently in T.V. comedy will ever hope to win). There were episodes where he alone made the show a gas. But you also have Harry Anderson's Judge Harold T. Stone; who's flair for magic and Mel Torme made him a much-loved star and 6'9 bailiff Nostradamus "Bull" Shannon helped make a name for Richard Moll as he played the simple-minded Forrest Gump-type lug that people would want to know. The other cast members were superb as well, especially as soon as they brought in Markie Post as the permanent Public Defender and deadpan comic Marsha Warfield as Bailiff Roz Russell in 1986. The cast stayed together until 1992 and it gelled beautifully.

With great stories and lots of hilarity, the show ruled, and although it was adult in nature because of Larroquette's character, it did it in a classy way. You couldn't hate Dan, he just had charm and flair, and wasn't something from "Friends". I believe this show is still running on A&E so if you've never seen this classic sit-com, give it a try and see what a sit-com is supposed to be like.

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19 out of 21 people found the following review useful:

Probably my all-time favorite sitcom

Author: Therod from WV, USA
4 August 2001

Of all the great sitcoms that came out of the 80s, this one takes the cake as my favorite. The cast couldn't be better and the gags are still hilarious even today. Excellent performances all-around, especially by Anderson and Larroquette.

On a side note, one of my favorite quotes of all-time comes from "Night Court" ---

Man in courtroom: "Why is the sky blue?" Harry: "Because if it was green, we wouldn't know where to stop mowing."

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18 out of 20 people found the following review useful:

A great spectacle in the history of sitcoms

Author: Agent10 from Tucson, AZ
22 July 2002

One of the best comedies of all time, this series will always have a special place in my heart. Not only was Harry Anderson and John Larroquette excellent in their roles along with back up characters like Richard Moll, Markie Post, Charles Robinson, Florence Halop, Marsha Warfield, and Mike Finneran. Often times great, with great guest performances by the likes of Dick Butkus and Mel Torme, this was one of those Golden Oldie sitcoms that should be considered one of the patron saints of the medium. Nowadays, most sitcoms die and fluster, but this one was excellent from the start. Hopefully, a special set with all of the episodes will be released someday, because I will most certainly get this set.

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19 out of 22 people found the following review useful:

One of my favorite shows of all time, period

Author: mattkratz (themattk@hotmail.com) from Richardson, TX
28 December 2000

They don't make shows like this anymore, which is a real shame. This was my favorite tv show of the time period, bar none.

Harry Anderson gave perhaps the best role of his career as the manic Judge Harry, and was absolutely wonderful. Richard Moll, Markie Post, and John Larroquette also made the show memorable. If you loved sitcoms that delivered nonstop laughs and great characters, the one's for you. Incidentally, "The Practice" guest star Ray Abruzzo appeared on this show for a few years.

**** out of ****

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14 out of 16 people found the following review useful:

wicked sense of humor

8/10
Author: mcfly-31 from anaheim, ca
15 July 1999

"Night Court" was one of the more bizarre shows to come along. The only time I've ever seen a show that featured a lot of slapstick and raunchy gags, unlike any other sitcom. Harry Anderson was Harry Stone, a zany judge who loved magic and silly props, which he would pull outta nowhere a lot of the time. In his court was my all time fave sitcom actor John Larroquette, as smutty Dan Fielding, a womanizing, outspoken district attorney. There was also well meaning but dumber than cotton Bull Shannon, a towering bailiff. These three were really the only ones who were around from the shows first episode. I'd have to say they may have set a record for most cast changes for a sitcom as there were at least 4(!) leading female characters. There was Karen Austin, Ellen Foley for a season, than a series of several replacement actresses for a few weeks before Markie Post finally grounded herself as the main female character. Also along midway through were Charles Robinson as Mac, Florence Hallop, who died shortly after joining the show, and she was replacing Selma Diamond who also passed away. Finally the producers went with a younger choice, Marsha Warfield as no nonsense Roz. Lots of great episodes, of mention the one where Harry's old college friend shows up. Anderson and Larroquette end up on a ledge nude which leads to the shows best line ever when one looks down at the others privates: "So, what's up?" They ended their run in 92 with an extremely disappointing show, which wrapped the characters fates nicely, but lacked any type of laughs at all. But still a terrific bunch of shows midway through the 80s make it one of the best, if edgiest, shows ever.

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12 out of 14 people found the following review useful:

wicked sense of humor

8/10
Author: mcfly-31 from anaheim, ca
7 November 2000

"Night Court" was one of the more bizarre shows to come along. The only time I've ever seen a show that featured a lot of slapstick and raunchy gags, unlike any other sitcom. Harry Anderson was Harry Stone, a zany judge who loved magic and silly props, which he would pull outta nowhere a lot of the time. In his court was my all time fave sitcom actor John Larroquette, as smutty Dan Fielding, a womanizing, outspoken district attorney. There was also well meaning but dumber than cotton Bull Shannon, a towering bailiff. These three were really the only ones who were around from the shows first episode. I'd have to say they may have set a record for most cast changes for a sitcom as there were at least 4(!) leading female characters. There was Karen Austin, Ellen Foley for a season, than a series of several replacement actresses for a few weeks before Markie Post finally grounded herself as the main female character. Also along midway through were Charles Robinson as Mac, Florence Hallop, who died shortly after joining the show, and she was replacing Selma Diamond who also passed away. Finally the producers went with a younger choice, Marsha Warfield as no nonsense Roz. Lots of great episodes, of mention the one where Harry's old college friend shows up. Anderson and Larroquette end up on a ledge nude which leads to the shows best line ever when one looks down at the others privates: "So, what's up?" They ended their run in 92 with an extremely disappointing show, which wrapped the characters fates nicely, but lacked any type of laughs at all. But still a terrific bunch of shows midway through the 80s make it one of the best, if edgiest, shows ever.

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11 out of 14 people found the following review useful:

An underrated masterpiece of comedy

Author: edmundmuskie from America
18 December 2002

Night Court

This is one of the truly great sitcoms. The shows tend to run together but the scripts are watertight and the characters are some of the best created in the history of sitcoms. The show is highly underrated as it was hysterical but it is not given the credit due. In this show the judge of a Manhattan Court Judge Harry Stone presided over a court. The man was young, off the cuff and hardly the type to be the judge. In fact he used to be a magician.

There are a series of other crazy characters. Earlier there was Gayle Hunnicut, and then Paula Kelly and then Ellen Foley, and then they settled for Markie Post who played very nicely Christine Armstrong, the Defense attorney in this Night Court. The consistent choice for the Prosecuting was the excellent John Larroquette, as Dan Fielding, the womanizing ladies man who had an extremely unstable personal life.

The rest of the cast was excellent as well. The bailiffs at first were Selma Diamond and Richard Moll, playing the chain-smoking bailiff Selma and the towering bald Bull. Both of them were classic characters. Sadly Selma passed away and was replaces By Florence, another old woman who was a chain smoker and much smarter than Bull.

Then there was Roz, the last bailiff in the turnover. Roz was excellent in the role as this time she was smarter and a bit stronger than the dovish Bull. The other major character in the show was Mac Robinson, the clerk of court. He was funny but added little to the show. This show is extremely underrated. This is hysterical stuff, some of the best slapstick on TV.

The pace was rapid fire. This was just hysterical, a time to sit down for a half hour and laugh your ass off. The show did have some dramatic moments and it added to the show but overall it is funny. Harry Anderson was a good lead for the show, a good solid reliable presence to guide the silliness. My other two favorites were Bull Shannon and Dan Fielding. They were excellent characters and their parts were very well written.

One of the best elements of the show is how well the characters worked together. These characters melded so well. They complimented each other very well without stealing each other's scenes. I will admit there was not that one episode that stuck out but all of the shows were great, especially earlier on.

This show is very underrated. This is show is often forgotten by critics and fans and gives way to other of the Thursday night classics like Cheers and the Cosby Show. Compared to Cheers this show is so much funnier. The writing was better the characters were great and it was just much funnier. Cheers was a fair show but it was slow. The pace of this show was rapid fire.

It is sad that this show is not on TV as much as it used to be. This is funny. This is also much better NBC Thursday night stuff than any of the stuff they have on Thursdays now like Friends and the rest. NBC never did give this one a chance either. They constantly moved the show around, never gave it a permanent slot, and it went off the air with little fanfare in 1992. But I still remember it. I did not like it when I was a child and my dad loved it but I started loving it when I was a teenager.

I admit in the later years the writing got a little less sharp, but it was still a classy show to the end. In it's early days the sexual exploits of Dan Fielding and some other perverse jokes made the show a bit controversial. John Larroquette won four Emmy's for this part and for the 1988-89 season he declined to be nominated. Too bad he probably would have won.

Here's to Bull, Judge Stone, Roz, Dan, Christine, Selma, Florence and the rest of those small character parts like Art the Janitor, Quan Li, Mac's wife, Phil, Dan's lackey and the endless array of prostitutes, criminals and other low lives that went through the courthouse. All of you were funny then, you are funny in reruns now and you will be funny in reruns in the future. Here's to Night Court, who came seven episodes short of 200 shows.

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9 out of 11 people found the following review useful:

Dan Fielding is my hero!!!

Author: coverme6 from Allentown, PA
2 April 2000

"Night Court", one of the best sitcoms to ever come out of the '80s, is back in the air in the A&E channel. The wacky crew of the Night Court can always make me laugh out loud ever afternoon after a long, tiresome day of high school. The whole cast is terrific, especially by Harry Anderson (Harry), Marsha Warfield (Roz), and Richard Moll (Bull), but I say the guy who really brings down the house with his sleazy and smart-assed attitude is John Larroquette, or better known as Dan Fielding in the show. It's hilarious to think that he is so horny all the time, that most women would degrade him as something lower than dogs***! But some don't notice how Dan is a good, caring person at heart. You don't know what I mean, you say? Watch "Night Court" at the A&E station

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8 out of 11 people found the following review useful:

One of the 80's Best

Author: wolf008 from NY
12 February 2002

The 80's produced some of Televisions best sitcom's, and Night Court is one of the eras shining examples. Harry Anderson's, Judge Harold T Stone is surrounded by an eccentric but very likable group. From the womanizing antics of John Larroquette's Dan Fielding, to Richard Moll's confused lovable giant, Bull Shannon, the cast never disappointed.

They were not afraid to be bizarre, as the writers would give us scenes such as Wild E Coyote appearing before Judge Stone for chasing the Road Runner. The cast would also face believable moral dilemmas, that alot of today's sitcom's do not dare attempt, or pull off as successfully.

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8 out of 11 people found the following review useful:

One Of The Best Shows Ever!

Author: Thor2000 from Collinsport, Maine
7 April 2001

I loved this show while it was on. In the beginning it followed the same premise of Barney Miller depicting the fact that city officials are just people themselves doing a job, but with the incredibly gorgeous Markie Post on the show for every one to drool over, the show became wildly cartoony, illogical and wild while it kept all the straight and contemplative issues that had made it a hit. Post really saved this show with her too perfect to be real figure while she followed the rigid restraints of a nun. John Larroquette was her perfect nemesis as the lecherous but snobbish Dan Fielding and Harry Anderson as the judge with a Peter Pan complex. The supporting staff of Charlie Robinson, Marsha Warfield and the ever likeable Richard Moll also became stars in this incredible show, but it had really lost its steam when Christine lost her virginity to have a baby and Dan found his morals. From there, the show just wasn't as good, and the roller coaster ride, as great as it was, was over.

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