The Beiderbecke Affair (1985) - News Poster

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Letter: Bridget Turner’s role in Get Lost!

Related: Bridget Turner obituary

I’d like to add to Michael Coveney’s recollections of Bridget Turner. She gave a fine performance as a radical English teacher, Judy Threadgold, opposite Alun Armstrong’s woodwork teacher in Alan Plater’s Get Lost! This was an ITV series in four parts, shown in 1981. When Armstrong proved to be unavailable for a sequel, Plater took its theme of people going missing as the basis for The Beiderbecke Affair, the first of three series with a different cast.

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See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

James Grout obituary

Stage and screen actor best known for his role as Chief Superintendent Strange in Inspector Morse

James Grout, who has died aged 84, was a supporting actor of authority and distinction best known on television for playing Inspector Morse's boss, Chief Superintendent Strange, as well as a gallery of prominent characters in other much-loved series. He was the flustered party whip in Yes Minister; a blunt-speaking judge, Ollie Oliphant, in John Mortimer's Rumpole of the Bailey; and an affluent, slightly dodgy businessman, Mr McAllister, in Alan Plater's The Beiderbecke Affair.

Tall and increasingly rotund as he grew older, Grout had an immensely wide-ranging career on stage, radio and television for more than 50 years. He was renowned for having a great voice, noted by the critic Harold Hobson in 1950 when, as a graduating Rada student, Grout recited from Don Marquis's The Dark Hours – words, said Hobson, that "seemed
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Alan Plater dies at 75

Playwright and author of TV dramas including The Beiderbecke Affair and Fortunes of War

Alan Plater, whose TV credits in a writing career spanning 50 years included The Beiderbecke Affair, Fortunes of War and the screenplay for A Very British Coup, has died, his agent confirmed to the BBC today.

Plater, 75, wrote novels and for film and theatre, but will be best remembered for a profilic body of television drama spanning six decades, starting with TV play The Referees for BBC North in 1961.

His final TV drama, Joe Maddison's War, starring Kevin Whately and Robson Green and set on the eve of the second world war in the north-east, where Plater was born, is currently in post-production for ITV.

Plater was born in Jarrow in 1935 and moved with his family as a young child to Hull, where he grew up.

He studied architecture at Newcastle University and worked for a short
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Alan Plater dies at 75

Playwright and author of TV dramas including The Beiderbecke Affair and Fortunes of War

Alan Plater, whose TV credits in a writing career spanning 50 years included The Beiderbecke Affair, Fortunes of War and the screenplay for A Very British Coup, has died, his agent confirmed to the BBC today.

Plater, 75, wrote novels and for film and theatre, but will be best remembered for a profilic body of television drama spanning six decades, starting with TV play The Referees for BBC North in 1961.

His final TV drama, Joe Maddison's War, starring Kevin Whately and Robson Green and set on the eve of the second world war in the north-east, where Plater was born, is currently in post-production for ITV.

Plater was born in Jarrow in 1935 and moved with his family as a young child to Hull, where he grew up.

He studied architecture at Newcastle University and worked for a short
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Alan Plater obituary

Popular northern dramatist for TV, theatre and radio, his works guaranteed humour, heart and humanity

Alan Plater, who has died of cancer aged 75, was one of a handful of writers, including Jack Rosenthal, Dennis Potter and Simon Gray, who truly made a difference on British television in the golden age of comedy, drama series and the single play. Like the other two Alans – Bennett and Bleasdale – his name guaranteed a quality of humour, heart and humanity, usually matched by high standards of acting and production values. And like them, he was definitely "northern".

He wrote 18 episodes of the BBC's pioneering police series Z Cars between 1963 and 1965, and 30 episodes for its sequel, Softly Softly. His gift of writing supple, salty dialogue for working-class characters was similarly displayed in Oh No, It's Selwyn Froggitt (1976-77), a series developed from his own single play and starring Bill Maynard as the inept handyman with the thumbs-up catchphrase "Magic!
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Mark Lawson on Alan Plater: 'Bright, socialist and proudly northern'

Throughout his long and varied career the TV writer helped maintain high standards across the industry

Alan Plater, who has died of cancer, was a notably versatile writer. Frequently employed on police series, his career spanned pioneering episodes of Z Cars and Softly Softly to an episode of ITV's Lewis screened in the final months of his life.

This was appropriate because, as well as being one of British TV's key dramatists, he also operated for five decades as a sort of drama cop.

As president of the Writers' Guild and a willing media pundit, Plater policed the schedules and statements of broadcasting executives, as well as the opportunities and conditions for fellow scriptwriters.

He kept the tone and behaviour of the industry higher than it might otherwise have been. Plater refused to accept that multi-channel television and the popularity of Simon Cowell's dancing dogs made it necessary to
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Alan Plater tributes

Alan Plater's agent Alexandra Cann and Chris Mullin, author of A Very British Coup, remember the TV writer

Alexandra Cann, Alan Plater's agent

"How do you sum up Alan's career? With great difficulty. He was an astoundingly wonderful television writer and his contribution to British television was of a very high standard. He wrote many wonderful original things as well as adaptations.

"His swansong will be an original work — Joe Maddison's War — for ITV. When he died, he was writing an essay on Hull. "He was writing to the end, but his last TV writing was an episode of Lewis and Joe Maddison's War. His body was very frail but his mind was extremely robust. He really wanted to engage right through to the end.

"I was his agent for 20 years and had known him a little longer. He was just the most utterly delightful person, thoroughly enjoyable and amusing.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Alan Plater tributes

Alan Plater's agent Alexandra Cann and Chris Mullin, author of A Very British Coup, remember the TV writer

Alexandra Cann, Alan Plater's agent

"How do you sum up Alan's career? With great difficulty. He was an astoundingly wonderful television writer and his contribution to British television was of a very high standard. He wrote many wonderful original things as well as adaptations.

"His swansong will be an original work — Joe Maddison's War — for ITV. When he died, he was writing an essay on Hull. "He was writing to the end, but his last TV writing was an episode of Lewis and Joe Maddison's War. His body was very frail but his mind was extremely robust. He really wanted to engage right through to the end.

"I was his agent for 20 years and had known him a little longer. He was just the most utterly delightful person, thoroughly enjoyable and amusing.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

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