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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009

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What we do on the Big Screen – A Look at Mocumentaries

29 November 2014 11:37 AM, PST | Blogomatic3000 | See recent Blogomatic3000 news »

Ever wondered about the inner workings of a vampire’s mind? Do you spend your spare time thinking about how a group of flat-sharing vampires divide up the household chores, or how they decide what to wear for a night on the town? Yeah, so do we. All these musings and many more are answered in Jemaine Clement and Taika Waitit’s hilarious mockumentary, What We Do In the Shadows. To celebrate the release of the Flight of the Conchords writers’ latest project, we take a look at the other best mockumentaries to hit the silver screen.

This is Spinal Tap (1984)

What many consider the ultimate mockumentary, this cult classic has topped many lists since the 80’s. Most of the dialogue was ad-libbed and the actors were accredited as writers as well because of this. One of the best rock movie quotes, “turn it up to 11”, comes from this masterpiece. »

- Phil Wheat

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10 Truly Chilling Documentary Films

5 November 2014 1:37 AM, PST | Obsessed with Film | See recent Obsessed with Film news »

Documentary film is often claimed to be the most “truthful” form of the cinematic medium. People turn to this genre to find facts, make discoveries, and learn something new. It’s a genre that’s been around from the very beginning too – with Workers Leaving the Lumiere Factory considered by many as the first real documentary ever made, along with its known reputation as one of the first ever cinematic productions.

Indeed, documentary is a genre that has spawned some of cinema’s greatest achievements. A variety of wonderful films have employed the form, ranging from Michael Apted’s Up! series, to Steve James’ Hoop Dreams.

Other directors such as Michael Moore and Morgan Spurlock have used the documentary method to help turn heads to troubling societal issues such as health care and fast food, whereas the likes of Woody Allen have used the form to provide a false sense »

- Gaz Lloyd

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Colin Firth and Jacki Weaver Try to Pick Their Favorite Woody Allen Film

22 July 2014 12:23 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Woody Allen has directed so many movies, it’s hard to pick just one favorite. At the L.A. premiere of his latest, “Magic in the Moonlight,” at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Science’s Pickford Center for Motion Picture Study on Monday, the attendees had some trouble even narrowing it down.

“Well, I’ve got about 12,” said Jacki Weaver, who plays Grace in the film. “I’ll always have a soft spot for ‘Zelig.’ And I love all the usual things. I love ‘A Midsummer Night’s Sex Comedy,’ and more recently I love ‘Match Point.’ I’m crazy about ‘Broadway Danny Rose’ and ‘The Purple Rose of Cairo’ and ‘Crimes and Misdemeanors’ and ‘Hannah and Her Sisters.’”

Colin Firth, who stars opposite Emma Stone, struggled with the same question. “I think people can play this, it’s like a parlor game all night, really. At the moment, »

- Sebastian Torrelio

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Check Out Woody Allen’s Lost Nixon Mockumentary Men Of Crisis: The Harvey Wallinger Story

16 July 2014 2:52 PM, PDT | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

While the media world explodes with speculation, excitement and, yes, a bit of trepidation for Avengers: Age of Ultron, we must keep the important things in perspective. Woody Allen’s Magic in the Moonlight is coming out next Friday, the latest in a long line of Allen films that stretch back six decades. But while you might know Mr. Allen’s work very well indeed, chances are you have not yet seen his 1972 mockumentary Men of Crisis: The Harvey Wallinger Story, which recently surfaced on YouTube.

Men of Crisis: The Harvey Wallinger Story was produced as a PBS special in 1972, marking Allen’s third directing credit and coming between Take The Money and Run and Bananas. With those two films in mind – as well as his later mockumentary Zelig, to which this bears a passing resemblance – one can see the development of Allen’s style as a director and, more potently, »

- Lauren Humphries-Brooks

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Get to Know the Best Couples From ‘When Harry Met Sally’

14 July 2014 2:00 PM, PDT | FilmSchoolRejects.com | See recent FilmSchoolRejects news »

The story of Harry and Sally is fine and all, but there are better couples in Rob Reiner‘s 1989 rom-com classic. And I’m not talking about Bruno Kirby and Carrie Fisher, either. For the 25th anniversary of When Harry Met Sally, I’d like to shine a light on the characters only credited as “documentary couples.” These seven pairs of adorable elderly folk are based on true stories, each one said to have been plucked from real people by screenwriter Nora Ephron. But we don’t know anything more about any of them. The actual couples don’t appear in the film but instead are portrayed by actors. Wonderful, old actors. Some of whom are still alive! Before we get to know each of these actors, let’s watch their appearances in Whms and once again enjoy the tales of fated spouses. “Arthur, you see that girl? I’m going to marry her.” The »

- Christopher Campbell

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Gordon Willis: Shining a light on Hollywood's 'Prince of Darkness'

19 May 2014 1:02 PM, PDT | EW - Inside Movies | See recent EW.com - Inside Movies news »

Often called “The Prince of Darkness” for his tendency to artfully cloak onscreen characters in ominous shadows, cinematographer Gordon Willis was the closest thing Hollywood had to a Rembrandt. His playful visual style, daring use of chiaroscuro, and seemingly effortless ability to conjure a mood of unsettling paranoia made him the ideal Director of Photography for the 1970s — a glorious filmmaking decade when Technicolor artifice was swept aside for New Hollywood naturalism.

Whether working with Francis Ford Coppola on The Godfather saga, Alan J. Pakula on his dizzying Watergate-era conspiracy thrillers All The President’s Men and The Parallax View, »

- Chris Nashawaty

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Cinematographer Gordon Willis Was Behind One of the Most Memorable Movie Shots of All Time

19 May 2014 9:50 AM, PDT | Vulture | See recent Vulture news »

Hyperbole is the absolute worst thing in the entire world. But cinematographer Gordon Willis, who died yesterday at the age of 82, was a genuine movie legend. In addition to serving as D.P. on all three Godfather movies (he was only nominated for an Oscar for the inferior third one — proof that the Academy Awards are half-bunk — as well as for Zelig), All the President's Men, and several Woody Allen movies, including Annie Hall, Willis also shot this moment below, from Allen's Manhattan. It's not hyperbole to employ the way overused word iconic here, and it's not hyperbole to say it's one of the most enchanting shots in all of American film. (I am a New Yorker, but I don't think this is sheer pride talking.)Here are some of my other favorite frames — from Manhattan: From The Godfather, on which Willis earned his nickname the "Prince of »

- Gilbert Cruz

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'Godfather' cinematographer Gordon Willis dies

19 May 2014 9:44 AM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

Falmouth, Mass. (AP) — Gordon Willis, one of Hollywood's most celebrated and influential cinematographers, nicknamed "The Prince of Darkness" for his subtle but indelible touch on such definitive 1970s releases as "The Godfather," ''Annie Hall" and "All the President's Men," has died. He was 82. Suzanne Berestecky of the Chapman Cole & Gleason funeral home in Falmouth confirmed Monday that he died and that the home is handling arrangements. Details on Willis' death were not immediately available. Willis was nicknamed The Prince of Darkness for his subtle but indelible touch on such definitive 1970s releases as "The Godfather," ''Annie Hall" and "All the President's Men." He retired after the 1997 movie "The Devil's Own." Through much of the 1970s, Willis was the cameraman whom some of Hollywood's top directors relied on during one of filmmaking's greatest eras. Francis Ford Coppola used him for the first two "Godfather" movies, Woody Allen for "Annie Hall" and »

- AP Staff

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Cinematographer Gordon Willis Is Dead

19 May 2014 8:55 AM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

One of Hollywood's most celebrated and influential cinematographers has died. Gordon Willis was 82. Suzanne Berestecky of the Chapman Cole & Gleason funeral home in Falmouth, Mass., confirmed Monday that he died and that the home is handling arrangements. Details on Willis's death were not immediately available. Willis was nicknamed The Prince of Darkness for his subtle but indelible touch on such definitive 1970s releases as The Godfather, 'Annie Hall and All the President's Men. He retired after the 1997 movie The Devil's Own. Through much of the 1970s, Willis was the cameraman whom some of Hollywood's top directors relied on during one of filmmaking's greatest eras. »

- Associated Press

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'Godfather' & 'Manhattan' Cinematographer Gordon Willis Dies at 82

19 May 2014 8:13 AM, PDT | firstshowing.net | See recent FirstShowing.net news »

While you're familiar with Francis Ford Coppola, Woody Allen and Alan J. Pakula's work as directors on The Godfather, Manhattan and All the President's Men, respectively, you may not know about the man who made those films look so damn incredible as the director of photography. Gordon Willis is the cinematographer who lensed all of those films, but sadly, Variety reports that he has passed away at the age of 82. Perhaps what is most impressive about Willis is that his career spans only 32 films, but his work within them is some of the most influential, impressive and generation-defining work behind the camera. Willis acted as cinematographer for the entire trilogy of The Godfather, and his work on the third installment landed him an Oscar nomination. However, his first nod from the Academy came from his work on Woody Allen's Zelig. But perhaps his most iconic work in cinema »

- Ethan Anderton

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'Godfather" D.P. Gordon Willis, Hollywood's Prince of Darkness, dies at 82

19 May 2014 8:00 AM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

One of the most joyous sequences in American film is the opening of Woody Allen's "Manhattan." As Allen's character Isaac speaks in voice-over, Gershwin's remarkable "Rhapsody In Blue" plays. "Chapter One. He adored New York City. He idolized it all out of proportion. No, make that… he romanticized it all out of proportion. Better. To him, no matter what the season was, this was still a town that existed in black and white and pulsated to the great tunes of George Gershwin. Mm. No. Let me start this over." Don't bother, Woody. You got it right the first time, and to provide that black-and-white counterpoint to the soaring sounds of Gershwin, cinematographer Gordon Willis shot some of the greatest images of New York City ever burned onto celluloid. Black-and-white felt like a perfect form of expression for Willis, who was referred to by many filmmakers as "The Prince Of Darkness, »

- Drew McWeeny

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'Godfather" D.P. Gordon Willis, Hollywood's Prince of Darkness, dies at 82

19 May 2014 8:00 AM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

One of the most joyous sequences in American film is the opening of Woody Allen's "Manhattan." As Allen's character Isaac speaks in voice-over, Gershwin's remarkable "Rhapsody In Blue" plays. "Chapter One. He adored New York City. He idolized it all out of proportion. No, make that… he romanticized it all out of proportion. Better. To him, no matter what the season was, this was still a town that existed in black and white and pulsated to the great tunes of George Gershwin. Mm. No. Let me start this over." Don't bother, Woody. You got it right the first time, and to provide that black-and-white counterpoint to the soaring sounds of Gershwin, cinematographer Gordon Willis shot some of the greatest images of New York City ever burned onto celluloid. Black-and-white felt like a perfect form of expression for Willis, who was referred to by many filmmakers as "The Prince Of Darkness, »

- Drew McWeeny

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Gordon Willis, 'Godfather' Cinematographer, Dead at 82

19 May 2014 7:25 AM, PDT | Rollingstone.com | See recent Rolling Stone news »

Legendary cinematographer Gordon Willis, the "Prince of Darkness" who was responsible for the look of such era-defining films of the Seventies as the first two Godfather films, All the President's Men, Annie Hall and Manhattan, died Sunday at the age of 82, according to Variety. His cause of death was not listed.

Peter Travers on 'The Godfather' Trilogy

A native of Queens, New York, Willis cultivated an early interest in photography and, while serving in the U.S. Air Force during the Korean War, joined the motion-picture unit. After the war, »

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Gordon Willis, Legendary 'Godfather' Cinematographer, Dead at 82

19 May 2014 7:04 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Academy Award-nominated cinematographer Gordon Willis, who helped define the look of 70s cinema and worked closely with Francis Ford Coppola, Woody Allen and Alan Pakula, died on Sunday at 82. As the Dp on iconic 70s films such as "Klute," "The Parallax View" and "All the President's Men," as well as "The Godfather," Willis created a heightened sense of tension. Later in the decade, with Woody Allen's "Annie Hall" and "Manhattan," Willis helped to cement the iconography of New York City on film. He also worked with Allen on "Interiors," "Zelig," "Stardust Memories," "A Midsummer Night's Sex Comedy," "Broadway Danny Rose" and "The Purple Rose of Cairo." Read More: 5 Tips from Master Cinematographer Gordon Willis"Gordon Willis is a major influence for me and many cinematographers of my generation," Academy Award-nominated cinematographer Darius Khondji told Indiewire. "But the modernity of his work will influence as much the generations of filmmakers to come. »

- Paula Bernstein

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Gordon Willis, ‘Godfather’ and ‘Annie Hall’ Cinematographer, Dead at 82

19 May 2014 5:56 AM, PDT | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

Gordon Willis, who shot a generation's worth of classic films, has died at the age of 82. Willis, who was twice nominated for Oscars and finally given an honorary Academy Award in 2010, was the man behind the camera work in all three of Francis Ford Coppola's “Godfather” films, and he often worked with Woody Allen, on films such as “Annie Hall,” “Manhattan,” “Zelig,” and “Broadway Danny Rose,” among others. Willis, known for his atmospheric shots and shadow play, also shot “All the President's Men,” “The Paralax View” and “Bright Lights, Big City.” His lone effort as a director was 1980s. »

- Jordan Zakarin

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R.I.P. Cinematographer Gordon Willis (1931–2014)

19 May 2014 5:16 AM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

Gordon Willis, one of cinema's most influential eyes and visual masters who defined the work of an entire generation of filmmakers, passed away over the weekend at the age of 82. But his body of work will forever inspire filmmakers. The most remarkable thing about Willis' filmography is that it's only 37 films long. However, the highlights are utterly remarkable: Alan J. Pakula's "Klute" and "All The President's Men"; Francis Ford Coppola's "The Godfather" trilogy; eight films with Woody Allen including "Annie Hall," "Manhattan," "Interiors" and "Zelig," and Hal Ashby's "The Landlord" are just some of the movies that will play on Willis' sizzle reel. And they all show the versatility that made the cinematographer one of the best the medium has ever seen. From the cool control of "Klute" to the shrouded, nearly majestic darkness of "The Godfather" to the beautifully black-and-white "Manhattan," Willis' greatest gift was in »

- Kevin Jagernauth

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The Godfather cinematographer Gordon Willis dies, aged 82

19 May 2014 2:07 AM, PDT | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - Movie News news »

Cinematographer Gordon Willis has died, aged 82.

Willis was best known for his influential photography on the Godfather series.

He helped mould the style of 1970s cinema, and also worked on Woody Allen's Annie Hall and Manhattan.

His nickname was the 'Prince of Darkness' due to his use of shadows, and was the director of photography on classics including Klute, The Paper Chase, The Parallax View and All the President's Men.

In 2009, he received an honorary Academy Award at the first Governors Awards ceremony.

He was Oscar nominated for The Godfather III and Woody Allen's Zelig.

Willis's father worked as a make-up artist at Warner Bros, and he served in the motion picture unit during the Korean War in the Air Force.

His last film was 1997's The Devil's Own. »

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'Godfather' Cinematographer Gordon Willis Dies at 82

18 May 2014 9:40 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

Gordon Willis, the acclaimed cinematographer behind the Godfather trilogy and such Woody Allen films as Annie Hall, Manhattan, Broadway Danny Rose and Zelig, died Sunday of complications from cancer at his home in North Falmouth, Mass., his son Gordon Willis Jr. said. He was 82. Willis' credits also include six features with director Alan J. Pakula -- including Klute (1971), The Parallax View (1974), All the President's Men (1976) and Comes a Horseman (1978)  --  as well as The Paper Chase (1973) and The Drowning Pool (1975) and Allen's Interiors (1978), The Purple Rose of Cairo (1985) and Stardust Memories (1980). Willis received Academy Award nominations for Zelig and The Godfather: Part

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- Mike Barnes

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‘The Godfather’ Cinematographer Gordon Willis Dies at 82

18 May 2014 9:12 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Influential cinematographer Gordon Willis, whose photography for “The Godfather” series and Woody Allen’s “Annie Hall” and “Manhattan” helped define the look of 1970s cinema, has died, according to his close associate Doug Hart’s Facebook page. He was 82.

Willis  was known as the Prince of Darkness for his artful use of shadows, and he was the director of photography on seminal 1970s films including  “Klute,” “The Paper Chase,” “The Parallax View” and “All the President’s Men.”

He received an honorary Academy award in 2009 at the first Governor’s Awards ceremony.

Among the other Woody Allen films he shot were “Interiors,” “Stardust Memories,” “Broadway Danny Rose,” “The Purple Rose of Cairo” and “Zelig,” for which he was Oscar-nommed. His other Oscar nomination was for “The Godfather III.”

Regarding his work on “The Godfather,” Variety wrote in 1997, “Among “The Godfather’s” many astonishments, the photography by Gordon Willis — a rich »

- Pat Saperstein

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Cinematographer Gordon Willis Dies At 82

18 May 2014 9:00 PM, PDT | Uinterview | See recent Uinterview news »

Cinematographer Gordon Willis, best known for his work on The Godfather series and a number of Woody Allen films, has died. He was 82.

Gordon Willis Dies

Willis’s death was confirmed by American Society of Cinematographers president Richard Crudo on Sunday.

“This is a momentous loss,” Crudo told Deadline. “He was one of the giants who absolutely changed the way movies looked. Up until the time of The Godfather 1 and 2, nothing previously shot looked that way. He changed the way films looked and the way people looked at films.”

Willis’s nickname in Hollywood was “The Prince of Darkness,” as he used the subtle absence of light to inject meaning into the films he worked on. Among the Woody Allen films his work appears in are the director’s best known and most beloved – Annie Hall and Manhattan. He also worked on Klute and All the President’s Men. His »

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