6.8/10
83
9 user 1 critic

The Two Gentlemen of Verona (1983)

In 16th century Italy, two inseparable friends suddenly become rivals for the love of a noblewoman.

Director:

Writer:

(play)
Reviews
Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Frank Barrie ...
Sir Eglamour
...
Hetta Charnley ...
Lucetta
Tyler Butterworth ...
John Hudson ...
Nicholas Kaby ...
Speed
...
Antonio
...
Panthino
Joanne Pearce ...
Silvia
...
Launce
Bella ...
Crab
...
Thurio
Paul Daneman ...
Duke of Milan
Daniel Flynn ...
Servant
Charlotte Richardson ...
Cupid
Edit

Storyline

Valentine and Proteus have been friends since childhood. The two are sad when Valentine must leave to work for a count, but Proteus is not too bothered since he is seeing the lovely Julia. Proteus' father, not liking the idea of the match, sends his son away to work with Valentine at the count's court. When Proteus is reunited with his friend again, Valentine introduces him to the beautiful and intelligent noblewoman Silvia. He confesses the two of them are in love and plan to elope. Unfortunately, Proteus becomes infatuated with Silvia upon first sight, forgetting all about Julia, and plans to betray his friend and his love to win Silvia for himself. Written by cupcakes

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Comedy

Parents Guide:

 »
Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

27 December 1983 (UK)  »

Also Known As:

The Complete Dramatic Works of William Shakespeare: The Two Gentlemen of Verona  »

Company Credits

Show more on  »

Technical Specs

Color:

See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

The music in this episode was created by Anthony Rooley, who wrote new arrangements of works from Shakespeare's own time, such as John Dowland's piece 'Lachrimae'. Performed by The Consort of Musicke, other musicians whose music was used include William Byrd, Thomas Campion, Anthony Holborne, John Johnson, Thomas Morley and Orazio Vecchi. As no original music was used, Stephen Oliver's theme from seasons three to five was used for the opening titles. See more »

Connections

Version of Dawson's Creek: Two Gentlemen of Capeside (2000) See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
A weak play but a great performance
9 December 2008 | by See all my reviews

"The Two Gentlemen of Verona" is one of Shakespeare's weaker plays and when I read it I thought the turn of the action was psychologically so improbable that it couldn't be pulled off credibly. However, I find the acting in this film is excellent and especially the final scene is very well done. I really enjoyed watching it. Maybe the contrition of Proteus could have been a little stronger but I think there really was a convincing show of shame and regret when the meeting with Valentine made him realize how grossly he had betrayed his friend. There is a fine balance of tragical and comical elements throughout the play and the setting is lovely. I was particularly impressed by the performance of Tony Haygarth. His Launce is funny but not exaggeratedly clownish. The play cannot even begin to compare with masterpieces like "Twelfth Night" oder "Much Ado about Nothing", but this adaptation for the screen is great.


3 of 3 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 9 user reviews »

Contribute to This Page