The Right Stuff (1983) - News Poster

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I’ll Be Seeing You

This unusually sensitive, overlooked WW2 romance skips the morale-boosting baloney of the day. Two people meet on a train, each with a personal shame they dare not speak of. Ginger Rogers and Joseph Cotten are excellent under William Dieterle’s direction, and Shirley Temple doesn’t do half the damage you’d think she might.

I’ll Be Seeing You

Blu-ray

Kl Studio Classics

1944 / B&W / 1:37 flat Academy / 85 min. / Street Date November 21, 2017 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95

Starring: Ginger Rogers, Joseph Cotten, Shirley Temple, Spring Byington, John Derek, Tom Tully, Chill Wills, Kenny Bowers.

Cinematography: Tony Gaudio

Film Editor: William H. Zeigler

Special Effects: Jack Cosgrove

Original Music: Daniele Amfitheatrof

Stunt Double: Cliff Lyons

Written by Marion Parsonette from a play by Charles Martin

Produced by Dore Schary

Directed by William Dieterle

Aha! A little research explains why several late-’40s melodramas from David O. Selznick come off as smart productions,
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‘Never Here’: Sam Shepard’s Final Film Gets A Thrilling New Trailer — Watch

  • Indiewire
‘Never Here’: Sam Shepard’s Final Film Gets A Thrilling New Trailer — Watch
When lauded actor, director, and playwright Sam Shepard passed away earlier this year, he left behind a rich and varied legacy, including an Academy Award nomination for Best Supporting Actor for his portrayal of pilot Chuck Yeager in “The Right Stuff,” forty-four plays, as well as several books, including short stories, essays, and memoirs, and a Pulitzer Prize for Drama in 1979 for his play “Buried Child.” He also left behind at least one new feature, Camille Thomas’s feature debut, “Never Here.”

The film follows Mireille Enos as Miranda, an installation artist whose latest project involves photographing strangers. It’s an intriguing premise, but one made even more compelling by Miranda’s own complex life — the kind that few people would want documented, oddly enough — including a secret love affair that leads to Miranda posing as a witness to save her man. Along the way, she becomes entangled in some very unexpected consequences,
See full article at Indiewire »

BAMcinématek to honour Sam Shepard by Anne-Katrin Titze - 2017-09-14 17:11:47

BAMcinématek pays screen tribute to Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright - True West: Sam Shepard on Film Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

Sam Shepard, who died on July 27, 2017 at the age of 73, will be honored by BAMcinématek in New York with True West: Sam Shepard on Film.

Wim Wenders' Don’t Come Knocking and Paris, Texas (BAFTA Best Adapted Screenplay nomination for Shepard); Philip Kaufman's The Right Stuff (Best Actor in a Supporting Role Oscar nomination for Shepard's portrayal of Chuck Yeager); Graeme Clifford's Frances; Daniel Petrie's Resurrection; Terrence Malick's Days Of Heaven; Michelangelo Antonioni's Zabriskie Point, co-written by Shepard; Robert Altman's adaptation of Fool For Love; Robert Frank's Me And My Brother (text by Shepard, poems by Allen Ginsberg and Peter Orlovsky); Shirley Clarke's video of Shepard's Tongues performed by Joseph Chaikin, and Far North, directed by Sam Shepard will be screened.
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

NYC Weekend Watch: “Gotta Light?,” Jerry Lewis, Nicolas Roeg, ‘The Trial’ & More

Since any New York City cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

Metrograph

“Gotta Light?” celebrates Twin Peaks‘ epochal eighth episode with features and short programs, while A-z continues.

Belle de Jour screens on Sunday, if you’re not watching Twin Peaks, while a Prick Up Your Ears restoration plays.

Museum of the Moving Image

A mini-Spielberg retro kicks off, while two classics by Jerry Lewis are shown.
See full article at The Film Stage »

NYC Weekend Watch: ‘The Right Stuff,’ ‘The Green Ray,’ ‘Fox and His Friends’ & More

Since any New York City cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

Museum of the Moving Image

The 70mm series continues with The Right Stuff, The Dark Crystal, and a Ukrainian trilogy.

Metrograph

A new print of The Green Ray screens this weekend, while Antonioni films continue running and “A to Z” runs.

Museum of Modern Art

The sci-fi series winds down, with Children of Men among its ranks.
See full article at The Film Stage »

Tobor the Great

Robot roll call! This also-ran robotic fantasy from the 1950s is precisely the kind of movie one would expect from Republic, a two-fisted anti-Commie tract for juveniles. The studio comes up with an impressive robo-hero, but short-changes us when it come time for action thrills. Still, as pointed out in Richard Harland Smith’s new commentary, Tobor filled the the kiddie hunger for sci-fi matinees, at least until Robby the Robot came along.

Tobor the Great

Blu-ray

Kl Studio Classics

1954 / B&W / 1:85 widescreen / 77 min. / Street Date September 12, 2017 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95

Starring: Charles Drake, Karin Booth, Billy Chapin, Taylor Holmes, Steven Geray, Hal Baylor, Alan Reynolds, Peter Brocco, Robert Shayne, Lyle Talbot, William Schallert

Cinematography: John L. Russell

Production Design: Gabriel Scognamillo

Special Effects: Howard and Theodore Lydecker

Film Editor: Basil Wrangell

Original Music: Howard Jackson

Written by Philip MacDonald, Carl Dudley

Produced by Richard Goldstone

Directed by Lee Sholem
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Scott Glenn on 'The Defenders' and Why 'Silence of the Lambs' Is a Coming-of-Age Movie

Scott Glenn on 'The Defenders' and Why 'Silence of the Lambs' Is a Coming-of-Age Movie
There is a certain relish to the way Scott Glenn describes a knife. His voice – a sort of Midwestern drawl that has a touch of Pittsburgh flint and a lot of Ketchum, Idaho, where he's called home for decades, in it – stays slow and steady as he talks about some of the various weapons he's been using in his martial-arts training lately. You can tell from the gleam in his eye, however, that the actor is getting a serious kick out detailing his recent discoveries in self-defense cutlery.

"There's this one called a karambit,
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Film Review: ‘California Typewriter’

Film Review: ‘California Typewriter’
Vinyl made a comeback, and so did slow food and long beards. So why not the typewriter? Actually, there’s a good reason why not: If you’re composing on a typewriter — a letter, say — and you change your mind about a word or a sentence you’ve just written, then you have to white it out or x it out. It’s an added task, and the result will likely be a tad smudgy. On the typewriter, every single keystroke is a tiny punch of commitment. (The seamless clickety-clack of a computer keyboard, with its instant erasability…not so much.) But according to “California Typewriter,” a lively and appealing analog-nostalgia documentary, it’s that very physicality that makes the typewriter a machine of the past that deserves to have a place in the future. As the movie sees it, the typewriter isn’t just for saying things. It’s for saying them and meaning them.

Directed
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Leonardo DiCaprio to star in Leonardo da Vinci biopic

Deadline is reporting that Paramount Pictures has beaten off competition from Universal for the rights to Walter Isaacson’s book Leonardo da Vinci, with plans to develop it as a star vehicle for for Oscar winner Leonardo DiCaprio.

DiCaprio – who was reportedly named after the legendary artist and scientist – will also produce the movie through his Appian Way banner. The book, penned by Steve Jobs author Isaacson, is said to “weave a narrative that connects [da Vinci’s] art to his science and voracious curiosity and imagination.”

Earlier this year, it was announced that DiCaprio will star in the mob drama The Black Hand, and is also lining up a reunion with Martin Scorsese on Killers of the Flower Moon. He is also developing an adaptation of The Right Stuff for National Geographic.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Fellow Lensers Hail New Academy President John Bailey: ‘A Film Scholar’

Fellow Lensers Hail New Academy President John Bailey: ‘A Film Scholar’
Historically speaking, presidents of the motion picture Academy have been directors, producers, stars, executives — more front-office types than in-the-trenches artisans. Until last week, the only “below-the-line” leader of the organization in its 90-year history was art director Gene Allen, who served from 1983 to 1985.

That makes this week’s election of cinematographer John Bailey all the more noteworthy for Academy members determined to keep their contributions to the art and craft of cinema in the spotlight. And in Bailey’s particular professional sphere, there is obvious cause for celebration; cinematographers are excited and inspired to finally see one of their own at the AMPAS helm.

“I think it’s really great,” says 13-time Oscar nominee Roger Deakins (“No Country for Old Men,” “Blade Runner 2049”). “I know he’ll be terrific and keep the momentum of the Academy going.”

Greig Fraser received an Oscar nomination last year for “Lion,” which also won him an American Society of Cinematographers
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Film Feature: HollywoodChicago.com Remembers Sam Shepard

Chicago – He was a true renaissance man, but his unassuming persona would conceal that lofty designation. Sam Shepard was a playwright, actor, author, screenwriter and director of countless important stage and screen works. Shepard died on July 27th, 2017, of complications due to Lou Gehrig’s Disease (Als). He was 73.

Sam Shepard, American Storyteller

Photo credit: File Photo

He was born Samuel Shepard Rogers III in Fort Sheridan, Illinois, and graduated high school in California. After a brief stint in college, he started his career in a traveling theater repertory company. After landing in New York City, he dropped the Rogers from his name and began to work Off Broadway. He won six Obie Awards for his stage writing, and began his screen career by penning “Me and My Brother” (1968) and “Zabriskie Point” (1970). His had a love connection with rocker Patti Smith, which led to the collaborative play “Cowboy Mouth” (1971). He
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

Stars Mourn the Heartbreaking Death of Legendary Actor and Playwright Sam Shepard

  • Popsugar
Stars Mourn the Heartbreaking Death of Legendary Actor and Playwright Sam Shepard
Sam Shepard passed away on July 27 after complications from Als, and Hollywood is mourning the death of the 73-year-old legendary actor and playwright. Fellow playwright Beau Willimon was among the first to pay tribute to him, posting a photo of Sam on Twitter and writing, "Sam Shepard is one of the greats. These eyes saw so much, and he wrote of what he saw with fearless, timeless honesty. Rip maestro." Since then, several other stars have taken to social media to share their favorite memories with the actor and tweet their condolences. RelatedMatthew McConaughey Has a Tearjerking Reaction to Sam Shepard's Death on the Red Carpet Sam is best known for his portrayal of pilot Chuck Yeager in 1983's The Right Stuff and was also known for his roles in films like The Notebook and Black Hawk Down. He is survived by his three children: Jesse, 47, from his marriage to O-Lan Jones,
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This Is the Play That Won Sam Shepard a Pulitzer Prize

  • BuzzSugar
This week, beloved actor and playwright Sam Shepard died of complications from Als at the age of 73. His passing was met with an outpouring of emotion from famous fans who have long been inspired by his work; in addition to starring in classic films like The Right Stuff, Steel Magnolias, Black Hawk Down, and The Notebook, Shepard also penned over 40 plays, as well as a handful of books, short stories, memoirs, and essays. It was one of these projects that won him a Pulitzer Prize in 1979. RelatedRemembering Sam Shepard and Jessica Lange's 30-Year Hollywood Love Story Shepard took home the Pulitzer Prize for drama thanks to his play Buried Child in 1979. It follows a family during the rural economic slowdown of the 1970s and depicts the disillusionment with the American Dream. It launched Shepard into fame as a playwright, and Buried Child's Broadway production in 1996 also garnered five Tony Award nominations.
See full article at BuzzSugar »

Matthew McConaughey Learned About Sam Shepard’s Death on Red Carpet

Matthew McConaughey Learned About Sam Shepard’s Death on Red Carpet
Matthew McConaughey’s reaction to first hearing about the death of acclaimed playwright and actor Sam Shepard was caught on camera while the actor was on the red carpet for his upcoming film “Dark Tower.”

Sam Shepard moved on?” McConaughey asked the Associated Press reporter who broke the news to him.

McConaughey worked with Shepard, who died on Thursday following complications from Lou Gehrig’s disease, on the 2012 coming-of-age drama “Mud.”

Related

An Appreciation of Sam Shepard: A Countercultural Playwright Who Became, as an Actor, an Ironic Icon

“Look, I’m not going to trivialize that situation, I just heard about it for the first time,” the actor said. “But I always told [director] Jeff Nichols this, look in ‘Mud,’ the whole trailer for ‘Mud’ could be Sam Shepard sitting in that green chair telling the boy about who Mud is. It would be about a two-and-a-half minute trailer, but it would have been really badass.”

“We
See full article at Variety - Film News »

'The Right Stuff' Filmmaker Remembers Sam Shepard: He Was "Born With the Gift of a Golden Ear"

'The Right Stuff' Filmmaker Remembers Sam Shepard: He Was
In the early '80s, writer/director Philip Kaufman (The Wanderers) took on the task of adapting Tom Wolfe's 1979 nonfiction best-seller The Right Stuff, which documents the Project Mercury space program. A central character is U.S. Air Force General Chuck Yeager, who in 1947 became the first man to break the sound barrier. While shut out of the space program, Yeager exemplified an earlier generation of test pilots against which the Mercury Seven measured their own accomplishments, and Kaufman knew casting the right actor to play Yeager would be crucial to the success of the movie. Kaufman spoke to The Hollywood...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Watch Matthew McConaughey's Emotional Real-Time Reaction to Sam Shepard's Death

  • PEOPLE.com
Watch Matthew McConaughey's Emotional Real-Time Reaction to Sam Shepard's Death
Matthew McConaughey first learned of Sam Shepard’s death during a red carpet interview last night, and his raw emotional reaction to the news was captured on camera.

Sam Shepard moved on?” the actor asked incredulously at The Dark Tower premiere in New York City Tuesday night, after an Associated Press reporter told him the news.

Shepard, who starred with McConaughey in 2012’s Mud, died at his home in Kentucky on July 27 after battling Als, also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease, People confirmed. The actor’s illness was not publicly known. He was with his family at the time of his death.
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Sam Shepard Remembered by ‘The Right Stuff’ Director Philip Kaufman: Half Jackrabbit, Best Chili Maker

Sam Shepard Remembered by ‘The Right Stuff’ Director Philip Kaufman: Half Jackrabbit, Best Chili Maker
Writer-director Philip Kaufman formed a lasting friendship with Sam Shepard when they worked together on “The Right Stuff,” the 1983 film for which Shepard was nominated for an Academy Award.

I first met Sam Shepard at a poetry reading when he was living here in the Bay Area. I was preparing “The Right Stuff” around then, and trying like hell to find someone who could play Chuck Yeager. Sam got up and read some of his poetry and my wife Rose said, “That’s your guy.” I said, “Where?” Yeager was a compact man, 5’7” or something, and here Sam was, this gangly guy. But I started listening and I got what she meant. Sam had this sense of honesty about him, and a sense of presence. He was a Gary Cooper kind of guy, even though I think Sam didn’t want to be Gary Cooper; he wanted to be Chester [the character played by Dennis Weaver] in “Gunsmoke,” the
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Sam Shepard's Cause of Death Has Been Revealed

  • Popsugar
Sam Shepard's Cause of Death Has Been Revealed
Legendary actor and playwright Sam Shepard passed away at his home in Kentucky on Thursday, The New York Times reports. Chris Boneau, a spokesperson for Sam's family, told CNN that the 73-year-old died of complications from Als, or Lou Gehrig's disease, and that his loved ones "request privacy at this difficult time." Sam was nominated for an Oscar for best supporting actor for his portrayal of pilot Chuck Yeager in 1983's The Right Stuff and was also known for his roles in films like The Notebook and Black Hawk Down. He is survived by his three children: Jesse, 47, from his marriage to O-Lan Jones, as well as Hannah, 31, and Samuel, 30, from his longtime relationship with Jessica Lange. The two separated in 2009.
See full article at Popsugar »

Critic's Notebook: Sam Shepard, Voice of the American West

Critic's Notebook: Sam Shepard, Voice of the American West
More than one tribute honoring Sam Shepard, the influential American playwright and actor who died at his Kentucky home on Thursday at 73, has pointed to the iconic image of his rangy figure clad in a bomber jacket, ambling away unfazed from a near-fatal crash in his Oscar-nominated role as test pilot Chuck Yeager in Philip Kaufman's 1983 film The Right Stuff.

Shepard's loose cowboy swagger, his easy masculinity and his rejection of conventional heroism were stamped all over that memorable performance, along with his laconic heartland manner and piercing directness.

But for me, the film role most emblematic of this...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »
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