Reviews

Photos

Add Image Add an image

Do you have any images for this title?

Learn more

People who liked this also liked... 

Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.2/10 X  

Following over two dozen different people in the almost wordless atmosphere of a dark night in a Brussels town, Akerman examines acception and rejection in the realm of romance.

Director: Chantal Akerman
Stars: Aurore Clément, Tchéky Karyo, Angelo Abazoglou
Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.6/10 X  

Anna, a detached and diffident director, arrives in Germany to show her latest film; she checks into a hotel, invites a stranger to her bed, and abruptly tells him to leave. He asks her to ... See full summary »

Director: Chantal Akerman
Stars: Aurore Clément, Helmut Griem, Magali Noël
Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7/10 X  

'Je' is a girl voluntarily lock up in a room. 'Tu' is the script. 'Il' is a lorry driver. 'Elle' is the girlfriend.

Director: Chantal Akerman
Stars: Chantal Akerman, Niels Arestrup, Claire Wauthion
Short | Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.3/10 X  

A young girl shuts herself away in her apartment and goes about her business in a strange way, as she wastes the night in her apartment.

Director: Chantal Akerman
Stars: Chantal Akerman
Nuit et jour (1991)
Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.4/10 X  

Jack and Julie live in a bare flat in Paris. At night, Jack drives a taxi while Julie wanders around the city, and in the day they make love. One day Julie meets Joseph, the daytime driver ... See full summary »

Director: Chantal Akerman
Stars: Guilaine Londez, Thomas Langmann, François Négret
No Home Movie (2015)
Documentary
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.7/10 X  

Chantal Akerman films her mother, an old woman of Polish origin who is short lifetime, in her apartment in Brussels. For two hours, we will see them eating, chatting and sharing memories, ... See full summary »

Director: Chantal Akerman
Stars: Chantal Akerman, Natalia Akerman, Sylvaine Akerman
La chambre (1975)
Short
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 5.8/10 X  

In a 360° circular panoramic shot the camera slowly pans an entire apartment (or house). When it first passes the bedroom there is nobody there but each time it shows the room again Chantal... See full summary »

Director: Chantal Akerman
Stars: Chantal Akerman
Comedy
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 5.9/10 X  
Director: Chantal Akerman
Stars: Sylvie Testud, Aurore Clément, Jean-Pierre Marielle
Short
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.3/10 X  

two girls came to Paris for the first time and they are trying to live.

Director: Chantal Akerman
Stars: Maria de Medeiros, Pascale Salkin
Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8/10 X  

A lonely widowed housewife does her daily chores, takes care of her apartment where she lives with her teenage son, and turns the occasional trick to make ends meet. However, something happens that changes her safe routine.

Director: Chantal Akerman
Stars: Delphine Seyrig, Jan Decorte, Henri Storck
Documentary | Musical
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7/10 X  

This is a making of a musical, with Chantal Ackerman behind and in front of the camera.It is mostly a collection of clips, talks, directions, lectures..... with the camera capturing the whole adventure.

Director: Chantal Akerman
Stars: Aischa Bentebouche, Katherine Best, François Beukelaers
Dis-moi (TV Movie 1980)
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.5/10 X  
Director: Chantal Akerman
Stars: Chantal Akerman
Edit

Cast

Credited cast:
Jean-Claude Brisson
Jeffrey Kime
Jérôme Lévy
Edit

Storyline

Add Full Plot | Add Synopsis

Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

29 May 2004 (France)  »

Also Known As:

The Man with the Suitcase  »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Color:

See  »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

Fettered heart
16 September 2016 | by (Greece) – See all my reviews

If you ever wondered how comedy at the hands of Akerman would look like, it's right here. It's the gentle kind that might make the edges of a smile curve upwards, not the kind that will elicit guffaws of course. It goes without saying.

It is in fact a twist on the kind of movie she usually makes, about a woman who waits and frets as walls of self cave in, here rendered for amusement. A woman returns to her apartment to find a friend she had allowed to stay is still there. She wants him gone now so she can have peace of mind but she's too reticent to make a scene.

It's Chantal herself on screen playing a filmmaker working on a script, so another way for her to tell us about solitary life she probably knows well and bugs her. It has the tone of intimate quiet I like about her, the sense of diary and fecund waiting; a tone she shares with other women filmmakers I like like Varda and Kawase.

Unable to concentrate on her writing, she begins plotting on her typewriter about ways to avoid him, like how early to wake up to have finished breakfast before he comes in, writing the movie we watch in fact.

Another notion. She eavesdrops on a phonecall he makes and looks slightly piqued to realize it's to another girl they know. Is this all about her finding ways to not express feelings she would like to?

When he finally goes, the loneliness of the empty flat offers no solace, the opposite. We see her set up a camera that feeds back images of the building outside, the withering function of memory, of the self inhabiting images that anticipate instead of facing the real thing.

What we see is a self who continuously moves about a house, doing everything except moving out of its own way of expressing itself truly. The movement is funneled into a story about the self- inflicted woes of having to do so of course; it's a comedy about being fettered in this way.

But the point remains, one that links back to Jeanne Dielman. Is life kind of hopeless that way, vague, opaque, to be tacitly accepted as disheartening? It's where I part ways with her, although I accept her whole as a genuine person, a gentle soul speaking about real things. I think she only really managed to rise above the fog in Meetings of Anna.

Here she offers a small gesture. She writes again the morning after; okay. But how truly to move out of our own self when that's all that stands in the way of expressing ourselves? I'm reminded here of one of my most cherished Buddhist koans that speaks about the guest and the empty house.


1 of 1 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Contribute to This Page