The Gold Diggers (1983) - News Poster

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Strictly Come Dancing: week nine – as it happened

The dancers were in Blackpool this week – so who rocked the Tower Ballroom, and who took the first bus home?

8.01pm GMT

Jonnie and Oti take a final turn around the dancefloor to “You’ve Lost That Loving Feeling”. Bit dusty in here.

On that sad note, this year’s Blackpool Special is over! Service will resume as normal next week, with only seven dancers left fighting for the four places in the Grand Final on 16th December. Kick off is at 6.50pm, so join me then for another sparkle-filled Saturday night. Thanks for joining in, and have a great week! Hx

7.58pm GMT

All the judges vote for Debbie and Giovanni, which means Jonnie And Oti are leaving the Strictly dancefloor.

He thanks the judges for judging him as an equal, and hopes the next person with a disability who performs on Strictly can tuck their bum under better than him.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Sally Potter, film director – portrait of the artist

'When you push through your limits, it gets painful – it's like a scab coming off'

What first drew you to film-making?

First, watching films as a child. Second, putting a camera to my eye when I was about 14. My uncle and his then partner lent me their 8mm movie camera. I realised that, when you frame the world, you see and feel different things.

What was your big breakthrough?

The premiere of Orlando at the Venice film festival. It was startling: I don't think I'd ever had people appreciate something I'd done on such a scale.

Was it always your intention to take a multidisciplinary approach to your art (1)?

At the time, these life choices don't even feel like choices, and they're very confusing, especially as a young person. But with hindsight, it was the best possible training to be a director, which is very much a mongrel art form:
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Sally Potter: 'I dreamed about the nuclear threat most nights'

Ginger & Rosa, which charts the friendship of two teenage girls in postwar London, draws on the film-maker's own memories of the Cuban missile crisis

You would never call Sally Potter a ginge. Not just because you wouldn't dare. Or because it would be like squirting ketchup over a slice of Poilane, or programming a double bill of The Tango Lesson and StreetDance 2 3D. You wouldn't even risk "strawberry blonde". The famed Potter mane is a big mingle of lemon and silver and cinnamon, which shimmers, Titian-ish.

Yet there is little doubt that she is, in some sense, Ginger, the carrot-topped hero of her new film. Ginger & Rosa is about baby-boomer best buddies, born on the same day, whose friendship in postwar London comes under strain when Rosa (Alice Englert) starts shagging Ginger's glamorous academic dad (Alessandro Nivola), freshly separated from her housewife mum (Christina Hendricks, doing downtrodden). The plot might not be autobiography,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Elle Fanning and Alessandro Nivola Are the 'Bomb'

  • NextMovie
Elle Fanning and Alessandro Nivola are about to get radical.

The duo have joined the cast of Sally Potter's new film, a a period coming-of-age-tale called "Bomb," according to The Playlist.

"Bomb" takes place in 1960s London, where "the Cold War meets the Sexual Revolution," and centers on a 16-year-old girl (Fanning) who wants to save the world from nuclear annihilation but finds it's her own family that's about ready to explode. Nivola will play a her father, a charismatic writer who has a falling out with his daughter after he has an affair with her best friend (to be played by Jane Campion's daughter, Alice Englert).

Sally Potter's films are always interesting even if they sometimes end up a little too overly ambitious. The experimental video and performance artist made her feature debut with "The Gold Diggers" in 1983 but rose to international fame with 1992's "Orlando,
See full article at NextMovie »

Elle Fanning, Alessandro Nivola & Jane Campion's Daughter Alice Englert To Star In Sally Potter's 'Bomb'

Elle Fanning, Alessandro Nivola & Jane Campion's Daughter Alice Englert To Star In Sally Potter's 'Bomb'
There aren't many experimental video and performance artists who can also say they've directed a film starring international megastar Johnny Depp, but Sally Potter is one of them. Well, the only one. Making her feature debut with the 1983 Julie Christie film "The Gold Diggers," she came to international attention with her excellent 1992 adaptation of Virginia Woolf's "Orlando," starring Tilda Swinton, before going on to make "The Tango Lesson," "The Man Who Cried" (which starred Depp and Cate Blanchett), and the underrated, spoken-entirely-in-iambic-pentameter "Yes," with Joan Allen.
See full article at The Playlist »

In the March Notebook

  • MUBI
Acquarello

Notes on Rendez-vous with French Cinema 2010

David Cairns

The Forgotten: Trousering the Ghost

The Forgotten: Vessel of Wrath

The Forgotten: Is My Face Red

The Forgotten: Lock-Up

Zach Campbell

Some Kind of Realism: Rossellini's War Trilogy

Andrew Chan

Sinophilic Cinephilia: Asia Society's "China’s Past Present, Future on Film"

Adrian Curry

Movie Poster of the Week: "Cold Weather"

Movie Poster of the Week: "Glory to the Filmmaker" or: Kitano in Posters

Movie Poster of the Week: "Feeder" and the SXSW Poster Award Winners

Movie Poster of the Week: "Everyone Else"

David Hudson

Berlinale. Cons and Ex-Cons

Daniel Kasman

Image of the Day: Unrequited Love #1

The Potential of the Mobile Film Festival: Rotterdam@Bam

Images of the Day: Joan Alone: Joan Bennett in Fritz Lang's "Secret Beyond the Door..."

At the Cinematheque: "The Prowler" (Joseph Losey, 1951)

Jean-Luc Godard's Homage to Eric Rohmer

Now in Theaters: "Shutter Island" (Martin Scorsese,
See full article at MUBI »

Tuesday Morning Foreign Region DVD Report: "The Gold Diggers" (Sally Potter, 1983)

  • MUBI
Sally Potter doesn't buy the dictum about how all you need to make a film is a girl and a gun. In the opening song for her 1983 debut feature The Gold Diggers, singing in tones that recall those of Dagmar Krause, Potter sings of violence (particularly male-perpetrated violence) as manifested in both film and literature, and how it messes with her head, and pleads, "Please give me back my pleasure!"

In its resolutely non-narrative way, and even with its convoluted dialogues involving the nature of capital and alienated labor, The Gold Diggers is, on at least one level, all about a feminist re-claiming of pleasure. But pleasure doesn't have to be soft, or undemanding. Here it is most definitely found in the awe-inspiringly austere landscapes captured in fabulous black and white by Potter and Babette Mangold Mangolte—the ground through which the film's titular diggers relentlessly toil, seeking the element
See full article at MUBI »

Tuesday Morning Foreign Region DVD Report: "The Gold Diggers" (Sally Potter, 1983)

  • MUBI
Sally Potter doesn't buy the dictum about how all you need to make a film is a girl and a gun. In the opening song for her 1983 debut feature The Gold Diggers, singing in tones that recall those of Dagmar Krause, Potter sings of violence (particularly male-perpetrated violence) as manifested in both film and literature, and how it messes with her head, and pleads, "Please give me back my pleasure!"

In its resolutely non-narrative way, and even with its convoluted dialogues involving the nature of capital and alienated labor, The Gold Diggers is, on at least one level, all about a feminist re-claiming of pleasure. But pleasure doesn't have to be soft, or undemanding. Here it is most definitely found in the awe-inspiringly austere landscapes captured in fabulous black and white by Potter and Babette Mangold Mangolte—the ground through which the film's titular diggers relentlessly toil, seeking the element
See full article at MUBI »

DVD & Blu-ray releases

The Hurt Locker

DVD & Blu-ray, Lionsgate

While it's sure to feature highly in the "Best Of" movie lists for 2009, as it has done in the recently published Us critics roundups, The Hurt Locker wasn't initially seen as an easy sell: an unconventional war movie for an unconventional war. Set in Baghdad in 2004, the film joins a three-man Eod (Explosive Ordnance Disposal) unit whose previous, more straightforward leader, is killed in the line of duty. Enter Sergeant James (Jeremy Renner), who appears to be an adrenaline junkie and far from the team player the men are used to. There are no large-scale encounters, just a relentless tide of ambushes, booby traps and explosions, as they come across an endless series of explosive devices, hidden in bags, cars, dirt and even cadavers, all the while in the sights of hidden snipers. Their life expectancy is a coin toss, and James's behaviour does nothing to improve the odds.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Sally Potter: 'There was no such thing as an easy ride'

More familiar with life on the fringes of British cinema, director Sally Potter finds herself the subject of a BFI retrospective. But she has no interest in looking back

In the late 1980s, Sally Potter was scratching around for funding to make Orlando, the Virginia Woolf adaptation widely considered her finest film, as well as a formative moment in the career of its star, Tilda Swinton. Potter's friend, the visionary director Michael Powell, had secured her a 10-minute meeting with Martin Scorsese, in which she hoped to convince him to extend a helping hand to a fellow maverick.

"Tilda and I went with our producer to meet Scorsese in New York," says the 60-year-old Potter, seated at a table in her east London office. "We walked into his place and nearly fainted with admiration. He then proceeded to spend the entire 10 minutes talking about how incredibly difficult life was for
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

This week's film event previews

Jim Jarmusch In Context, London

With their relaxed pace, obsessions about seemingly meaningless detail and contempt for the very concept of plotting, Jarmusch's films are very much a context of their own. But on the back of his latest, The Limits Of Control, this is a good chance to see other fine Jarmusch movies such as Dead Man, Down By Law, and Stranger Than Paradise alongside films that inspired them, like Buster Keaton's The Cameraman, They Live By Night and L'Atalante, as well as kindred spirits such as Wings Of Desire and The Man Without A Past.

Ica Cinema, SW1, Fri to 23 Dec

Phelim O'Neill

Sally Potter, London

With Dennis dead and Harry taking a well-earned rest, the UK's current Potter of choice is award-winning, genre-bending director Sally. Her small but significant body of work includes 1992's critically lauded Orlando, a highly unusual and witty imagining of Virginia Woolf's classic gender-switching novel.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

See also

Showtimes | External Sites