7.7/10
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37 user 18 critic

The Dresser (1983)

PG | | Drama | 6 December 1983 (USA)
An effeminate personal assistant of a deteriorating veteran actor struggles to get him through a difficult performance of King Lear.

Director:

Writer:

(screenplay)
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ON DISC
Nominated for 5 Oscars. Another 5 wins & 12 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
Sir
...
...
Zena Walker ...
...
...
...
Irene
Betty Marsden ...
Violet Manning
Sheila Reid ...
Lydia Gibson
Lockwood West ...
Donald Eccles ...
Mr. Godstone
Llewellyn Rees ...
Horace Brown
Guy Manning ...
Benton
Anne Blackman ...
Beryl (as Anne Mannion)
Kevin Stoney ...
C. Rivers Lane
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Storyline

In a touring Shakespearean theater group, a backstage hand - the dresser, is devoted to the brilliant but tyrannical head of the company. He struggles to support the deteriorating star as the company struggles to carry on during the London blitz. The pathos of his backstage efforts rival the pathos in the story of Lear and the Fool that is being presented on-stage, as the situation comes to a crisis. Written by xenophil

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

What happens backstage is always true drama. And often pure comedy.

Genres:

Drama

Certificate:

PG | See all certifications »
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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

6 December 1983 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

El vestidor  »

Box Office

Opening Weekend:

$43,132 (USA) (11 December 1983)

Gross:

$5,310,748 (USA)
 »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

(Rankcolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The screenplay is by Ronald Harwood adapted from his own award-winning play, which first captivated audiences on the London and New York stage in 1980. At the time that this movie was first made and released, the play had been translated into twenty-three languages and had enjoyed tremendous success in capital city seasons throughout the world. See more »

Goofs

After Sir and Norman leave the marketplace, they're passed by a Routemaster bus. These buses were first used in London in 1954, and weren't used outside London until the 1970's. See more »

Quotes

[as a train is leaving a station]
Sir: Stop that train!
[the train stops at once]
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Soundtracks

In the Hall of the Mountain King
(uncredited)
Written by Edvard Grieg
Played by the theatre orchestra
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User Reviews

 
Brilliant and illuminating and moving
5 September 2005 | by (New York, NY) – See all my reviews

Albert Finney and Tom Courtenay are brilliant as Sir and his Dresser. Of course the play is brilliant to begin with and nothing can compare with the immediacy and collegiality of theatre, and I think you listen better in theatre; but on the screen we become more intimate, we're 'up-close' more than we are in the theatre, we witness subtle changes in expression, we "see" better as well as listen. Both the play and the movie are wondrous: moving, intelligent, illuminating--of the backstage story of the company, of historical context, of the two main characters, and of the parallel characters in "Lear" itself. If you cannot get to see it in a theatre (I don't imagine it's produced much these days) then, please, do yourself a favor, and get the video.


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