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October Horrors 2017 Day 12 – It (1990)

It, 1990.

Directed by Tommy Lee Wallace.

Starring Tim Curry, Jonathan Brandis, Seth Green, Emily Perkins, Brandon Crane, Adam Faraizl, Marlon Taylor, Ben Heller, Richard Thomas, John Ritter, Annette O’Toole, Harry Anderson, Dennis Christopher, Tim Reid, and Richard Masur.

Synopsis:

A group of childhood friends are reunited after a spate of gruesome murders in their former hometown suggest the return of “It”, a shape-shifting demonic entity that has terrorised the community for decades, possibly even centuries.

Stephen King has written a lot of books. Like lots of them.

Among his vast bibliography, one work has stood out as one of his most iconic and popular works; the mammoth 1986 novel simply titled It, a terrifying coming of age tale that resulted in everyone hating clowns. It’s also a book that has recently re-entered the public conscious thanks in no small part to the critically acclaimed big screen adaptation that has
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Tiff Review: ‘The Wife’ Provides Glenn Close with One of Her Finest Performances

Playing Joan, the wife of a newly-announced Nobel Prize-winning novelist Joseph (Jonathan Pryce) whose career she has supported while setting her own ambitions aside, Glenn Close gives one of her finest performances in Björn Runge’s latest feature. The actress is magnificent and exudes a hypnotic screen presence in the affecting drama, aptly titled The Wife.

Runge’s film opens as the couple first receive news that Joseph has won the prize. They jump up and down on the bed like giddy children as he chants “I won the Nobel Prize.” As the significance sinks in and the full implications bear down, Joan abruptly stops celebrating and leaves the room. Things don’t get any better once they arrive in Sweden in preparation for Stockholm ceremony. Joan is clearly deeply annoyed by something and we can only guess what.

As more and more troubling details gradually spill forth, we learn
See full article at The Film Stage »

Tiff Audience Award goes to “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”

Yesterday afternoon, the Toronto International Film Festival announced their award winners. Notably, the Audience Award, which is the top prize at Tiff, went to Martin McDonagh’s Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri. The runner ups were, perhaps surprisingly, Craig Gillespie’s I, Tonya, as well as Luca Guadagnino’s Call Me By Your Name. The win for Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri was slightly surprising, though the word out of Toronto has been incredibly positive. After taking a prize recently at the Venice Film Festival for Screenplay, it’s currently the most awarded contender of the year so far. If nothing else, that’s a nice head start for a movie such as this one. Looking specifically at the Audience Award and thinking in terms of its history, this is a somewhat reliable indicator of prestige. Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri now joins a group that has five prior Best Picture winners,
See full article at Hollywoodnews.com »

New Academy President John Bailey is Willing to Ask if Movies Need Theaters For Oscar Qualification, and Other Radical Ideas

New Academy President John Bailey is Willing to Ask if Movies Need Theaters For Oscar Qualification, and Other Radical Ideas
As words like film, negative, celluloid, unspool, and reel become increasingly archaic, even the venerable Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences realizes that it needs to evolve. At the Telluride Film Festival, I sat down with new Academy president John Bailey to discuss what he has in mind. Here’s what we can expect from the 75-year-old cinematographer of “The Big Chill” and “Groundhog Day,” who is proud to be the rare filmmaker representing the Academy board.

(Re)Define the motion picture

Bailey is a realist as much as a cineaste. At Telluride, he appreciated Paul Schrader’s well-reviewed “First Reformed” — but fully supported the possibility that the film would go to Netflix. “It’s very unlikely the studios would pick it up,” said Bailey. “In reality, Netflix and Amazon have now become the studios that have the courage to make the film nobody else would make.”

Similarly, while
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

New Academy President John Bailey is Willing to Ask if Movies Need Theaters For Oscar Qualification, and Other Radical Ideas

  • Indiewire
New Academy President John Bailey is Willing to Ask if Movies Need Theaters For Oscar Qualification, and Other Radical Ideas
As words like film, negative, celluloid, unspool, and reel become increasingly archaic, even the venerable Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences realizes that it needs to evolve. At the Telluride Film Festival, I sat down with new Academy president John Bailey to discuss what he has in mind. Here’s what we can expect from the 75-year-old cinematographer of “The Big Chill” and “Groundhog Day,” who is proud to be the rare filmmaker representing the Academy board.

(Re)Define the motion picture

Bailey is a realist as much as a cineaste. At Telluride, he appreciated Paul Schrader’s well-reviewed “First Reformed” — but fully supported the possibility that the film would go to Netflix. “It’s very unlikely the studios would pick it up,” said Bailey. “In reality, Netflix and Amazon have now become the studios that have the courage to make the film nobody else would make.”

Similarly, while
See full article at Indiewire »

Soundtracking: "The Big Chill"

Chris Feil's weekly series looks at the use of music in movies

The Big Chill is one of the definitive films about the baby boomer generation, marking their coming of a certain age where life begins to look a lot less like what they were promised. And this is a generation that was promised an awful lot. It’s appropriate then that Lawrence Kasdan packs the film with tunes that contrast a youthful optimism with more complicated tones of soulful longing.

Many of the songs featured in the film would become soundtrack staples to the extent that they became movie cliches. Off-hand you can probably think of a half dozen films that also featured “The Weight” by The Band or “Joy to the World” by Three Dog Night. But what The Big Chill got right - and first, mind you - about much of this music is how it was the tapestry of that generation.
See full article at FilmExperience »

Horror Highlights: Cavitycolors’ Society Shirts & Pins Collection, Demons, Don’T Sleep, Elliot, The Atoning

  • DailyDead
The gorgeous gore of Brian Yuzna's Society comes to life in Cavitycolors' new shirts and pins collection, and we have a look at the new releases in today's Horror Highlights, which also includes release details on Demons, Don't Sleep, Elliot, and The Atoning.

Cavitycolors' Society Collection: From Cavitycolors: "Our Society® collection is Available Now! New T-shirts, Baseball Shirts, plus two brand new gross-out Enamel Pins! Limited first run on everything, so don't be a butthead, grab one today!"

To learn more, visit Cavitycolors online.

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Demons Trailer & Release Details: "The devil comes to town this October when Demons, written, directed and starring Miles Doleac, hits theaters and VOD from Uncork’d Entertainment.

A psychological thriller that marries elements of The Exorcist, The Shining and The Big Chill, Demons tells of a celebrated fiction writer and former priest (Doleac, “American Horror Story”, The Hollow) who, along with his wife, are
See full article at DailyDead »

Academy President John Bailey Vows to Finish the Museum – and Get Along With Dawn Hudson

  • The Wrap
Academy President John Bailey Vows to Finish the Museum – and Get Along With Dawn Hudson
Cinematographer John Bailey was elected president of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences one week ago, at a meeting where the AMPAS Board of Governors elected a successor to Cheryl Boone Isaacs, who served the maximum of four consecutive terms. The first president ever elected from the Cinematographers Branch, Bailey is a 75-year-old film veteran whose movies include “Ordinary People,” “The Big Chill,” “Groundhog Day” and “Mishima: A Life in Four Chapters,” for which he won an award at Cannes. He’s a student of film and of Hollywood history, and he has also been one of the board’s.
See full article at The Wrap »

Tension at the Academy: Inside New President John Bailey’s Surprise Election

Tension at the Academy: Inside New President John Bailey’s Surprise Election
On Aug. 9, John Bailey visited the headquarters of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. It was his first full day as president of the institution, and his new office was virtually empty.

“A tabula rasa,” he said.

He met for two hours with Dawn Hudson, the Academy’s chief executive officer. Hudson talked about her priorities — diversity and the Academy’s museum — while Bailey, a veteran cinematographer, expressed his passion for film education programs.

“It was a beautiful discussion,” insisted Bailey. “I am going to have the best relationship with Dawn you can imagine.”

That would mark a sharp reversal from the often tense, adversarial association the two have had for years. Bailey, who is part of a vocal group of below-the-line members who believe the board should take a more hands-on role in running the Academy, has been a longtime outspoken critic of Hudson and her leadership. “This could be a disaster,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

New Academy Chief Defends Diversity Push to Remedy "Open Wound"

New Academy Chief Defends Diversity Push to Remedy
On the morning of Aug. 9, cinematographer and Academy governor John Bailey called his agents at Wme. “Please don’t send me any scripts,” he said. “I don’t even want to read anything.”

The 75-year-old lensman (Ordinary People, The Big Chill) wasn’t retiring; instead, he was preparing for what might be the toughest assignment of his life. The night before, he had been elected president of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences in something of a surprise, beating the only other contender, casting director David Rubin, to become the leader of the organization behind the Oscars. The two...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

August 15th Blu-ray & DVD Releases Include Alien: Covenant, One Dark Night, Pet Sematary

  • DailyDead
We have a light day of horror and sci-fi home entertainment titles on August 15th, with most of the fanfare this week going to Ridley Scott’s Alien: Covenant, which comes in a variety of formats and special releases (for those looking for Collector’s Editions, be sure to check out the likes of Target, Walmart and Best Buy). Prometheus is also now getting a 4K Ultra HD disc (in honor of Covenant’s home bow), and there’s also a new Alien 6-Film Collection that 20th Century Fox has assembled.

Other notable releases for August 15th include Well Go USA's Bluebeard, One Dark Night (from Jason Lives director Tom McLoughlin), Night Moves, The Scarehouse, and Riverdale: The First Complete Season, and Pet Sematary is headed to Blu-ray this week as well.

Alien: Covenant (20th Century Fox Home Entertainment, 4K Ultra HD/ Blu/ Digital HD, Blu/DVD/Digital HD
See full article at DailyDead »

Glenn Close to Receive Golden Icon Award at Zurich Film Festival

Glenn Close in “The Great Gilly Hopkins

It’s time for Glenn Close to add another award to her mantle. The six-time Oscar nominee has taken home multiple Emmys, Golden Globes, and Tony Awards, and now she’s set to receive the Golden Icon Award at the upcoming Zurich Film Festival (Zff), Variety reports. The “Damages” alumna will also present her latest feature at the fest, “The Wife.”

Close’s career spans over four decades and includes films such as “The World According to Garp,” “The Big Chill,” and “Fatal Attraction.” “The Girl With All The Gifts” and “Albert Nobbs” are among her more recent features. Her stage credits include “Sunset Boulevard” and “The Real Thing.”

“From her commanding portrayal of Patty Hewes in ‘Damages’ to the glorious Marquise de Merteuil in Stephen Frears’ ‘Dangerous Liaisons’ via Alex Forrest and Cruella De Vil, Glenn Close has brought her extraordinary presence to countless memorable roles over a truly formidable career,” said Zff co-directors Nadja Schildknecht and Karl Spoerri in a statement.

An adaptation of Meg Wolitzer’s 2003 novel of the same name, “The Wife” sees Close playing Joan Castleman, a woman best known as the wife of an incredibly successful writer. Joan has dedicated years of her life to nurturing her husband’s (Jonathan Pryce, “Game of Thrones”) career, but a moment of revelation causes Joan to reconsider their relationship and her future. “The Wife” will make its world premiere at the Toronto International Film Festival.

Close recently signed on to topline “Sea Oak,” a half-hour Amazon pilot about a woman who comes back from the dead.

Zff runs from September 28-October 8.

Glenn Close to Receive Golden Icon Award at Zurich Film Festival was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

Glenn Close to Be Honored at Zurich Film Festival, Present ‘The Wife’

Glenn Close to Be Honored at Zurich Film Festival, Present ‘The Wife’
Glenn Close will receive the Golden Icon Award at the Zurich Film Festival. The six-time Academy Award nominee will also present her latest film at the Festival, “The Wife.”

“From her commanding portrayal of Patty Hewes in “Damages” to the glorious Marquise de Merteuil in Stephen Frears’ “Dangerous Liaisons” via Alex Forrest and Cruella De Vil, Glenn Close has brought her extraordinary presence to countless memorable roles over a truly formidable career,” said Zff co-directors Nadja Schildknecht and Karl Spoerri in a statement.

Close has recently finished filming Julian Fellow’s adaptation of Agatha Christie’s “Crooked House” and her other recent work includes sci-fi thriller “What Happened to Monday,” “The Girl With All the Gifts” and the comedy “Bastards.” She has also been in “Sunset Boulevard” on Broadway.

She made her feature film debut in “The World According to Garp,” before receiving Oscar-nomination for “The Big Chill,” “The “Natural,” “Fatal Attraction,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Why John Bailey Is the Academy’s New President

Why John Bailey Is the Academy’s New President
When the Academy Board of Governors convened Tuesday night to pick the 34th AMPAS president, all eyes were on Laura Dern as the frontrunner. Instead, the outcome was a surprise: While three potential candidates had emerged from the 54-member body, including popular actors branch governor Dern, with her career in full-throttle she declined her nomination and supported casting director David Rubin, who was eventually elected Treasurer. Documentarian Rory Kennedy did not get an expected nomination; instead cinematographer John Bailey ran against Rubin.

Finally the board voted for Bailey, who represents the 7000-member Academy’s still-dominant constituents: older white men. At age 74, Bailey replaces publicity executive Cheryl Boone Isaacs (the third woman and first African American to hold the post) who leaves the board after a tumultuous four-year term.

During that time, she and Academy CEO Dawn Hudson spearheaded a concerted drive to add more diversity to the Academy, urging the
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Why John Bailey Is the Academy’s New President

  • Indiewire
Why John Bailey Is the Academy’s New President
When the Academy Board of Governors convened Tuesday night to pick the 34th AMPAS president, all eyes were on Laura Dern as the frontrunner. Instead, the outcome was a surprise: While three potential candidates had emerged from the 54-member body, including popular actors branch governor Dern, with her career in full-throttle she declined her nomination and supported casting director David Rubin, who was eventually elected Treasurer. Documentarian Rory Kennedy did not get an expected nomination; instead cinematographer John Bailey ran against Rubin.

Finally the board voted for Bailey, who represents the 7000-member Academy’s still-dominant constituents: older white men. At age 74, Bailey replaces publicity executive Cheryl Boone Isaacs (the third woman and first African American to hold the post) who leaves the board after a tumultuous four-year term.

During that time, she and Academy CEO Dawn Hudson spearheaded a concerted drive to add more diversity to the Academy, urging the
See full article at Indiewire »

John Bailey Elected President of the Motion Picture Academy

John Bailey Elected President of the Motion Picture Academy
In a surprise victory, cinematographer John Bailey has been elected the 36th president of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, the organization that annually presents the Oscars for excellence in filmmaking. The decision was made Tuesday night at a monthly meeting of the AMPAS board of governors.

The new Academy leader will succeed exiting president Cheryl Boone Isaacs, who served a maximum four-year term in the role and, along with CEO Dawn Hudson, oversaw many dramatic shifts in the movie monolith’s demographical makeup and procedural status quo.

Bailey, 74, is a dark-horse winner. His credits include “Ordinary People,” “American Gigolo,” “The Big Chill,” “Groundhog Day,” “As Good as It Gets,” “The Anniversary Party,” “The Way Way Back” and “A Walk in the Woods.” In 2014 he received the American Society of Cinematographers Lifetime Achievement Award, but he has never received an Oscar nomination.

Related

Whoopi Goldberg Among New Film Academy Governors

Casting director David Rubin (who
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Academy Board Elects Cinematographer John Bailey President

Academy Board Elects Cinematographer John Bailey President
John Bailey was elected president of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences tonight by the organization’s board of governors.

Bailey is a board member representing the cinematographers' branch, where he is currently serving his fourteenth year on the board. Elected to a non-salaried one-year term, he will succeed Cheryl Boone Isaacs, who has stepped down from the Academy’s board after serving as president for the maximum number of four consecutive one-year terms allowed.

Bailey, whose credits range from Ordinary People and American Gigolo through The Big Chill, Groundhog Day and, more recently, A Walk in the Woods, emerged...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

‘Detroit’: Martha Reeves, Otis Williams, Questlove on Story Behind Film’s Music

‘Detroit’: Martha Reeves, Otis Williams, Questlove on Story Behind Film’s Music
On a sweltering evening in July 1967, Martha Reeves and the Vandellas were about to perform their new single, “Jimmy Mack,” at a hometown show at Detroit’s Fox Theatre. The group was on a roll, with a string of Top 10 singles including “Dancing in the Street,” “Nowhere to Run” and “Heat Wave.” Yet the trio wasn’t allowed to perform its latest song.

“I was very excited,” recalls Reeves in an interview with Variety. “However, I never got a chance to sing it because [a stagehand] beckoned to me and told me to tell the audience that there’s a curfew because a riot has broken out, and to ask the patrons to leave peacefully. We went outside, and tanks were up and down Woodward Avenue in front of the Fox. It was panic — panic.”

The moment inspired a key scene in “Detroit,” the Kathryn Bigelow-directed retelling of the murder of three black men by police at the
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Blu-ray Review – Psycho II (1983)

Psycho II, 1983.

Directed by Richard Franklin.

Starring Anthony Perkins, Vera Miles, Meg Tilly, Robert Loggia, Dennis Franz, Hugh Gillin, and Tom Holland.

Synopsis:

22 years after he was incarcerated for murder Norman Bates is declared sane and released back to his motel but Mother isn’t likely to let him live a peaceful life.

Sequels to acknowledged classic movies often bring about derision and a bit of a sniffy attitude, especially belated ones not made by the original crew or featuring different actors, but every so often a worthy successor appears just to prove there are exceptions. Psycho II appeared in 1983, 23 years after Alfred Hitchcock’s seminal original, and reunites original cast members Anthony Perkins and Vera Miles but with Hitchcock having died in 1980 Universal Pictures turned to Richard Franklin, one of his students, to helm the project, based on a script written by Tom Holland (Fright Night/Child’s Play
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Our Favorite Housewives in 80s Movies

Housewife isn’t a term you hear all that often anymore, but it’s still a very widely known way of life. Housewives in the 1980’s were beginning a new and decidedly different trend that saw a great divide between many women that saw fit to continue the traditional role and those that started making their way out of the house. Granted, this change had been coming already, but in the 80’s the pronounced difference was really starting to get noticed. Here are a few of the housewives from the 80’s that we remember fondly. 5. Karen Bowens – The Big Chill

Our Favorite Housewives in 80s Movies
See full article at TVovermind.com »
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