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Wrong Is Right (1982) Poster

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This 1982 movie has been said to have possibly anticipated future world events. James Plath at 'DVD Town' says of this movie that "... it's impossible to watch it more than twenty years later without seeing a ton of eerie similarities to the Bush White House" whilst Paul McElligott at 'Celluloid Heroes' writes: "The idea of the U.S. going to war in the Middle East over dubious claims of terrorists possessing weapons of mass destruction, specifically atomic bombs, is central to the plot. The discovery of the aforementioned bombs dangling from an antenna on top of the World Trade Center is probably far more chilling now than the filmmakers could ever have intended."
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Director Richard Brooks' insistence on authenticity led Brooks to an impressive variety of recognized experts in the field of atomic weapons and international terrorism. Advanced nuclear research scientists were recruited, along with policy analysts at the prestigious Rand Corporation in his effort to equip the picture with the facts of the time and its tomorrow.
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The picture is a satire of American news reporting, the political system, and covert agencies, according to the movie's production notes.
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The screenwriters created a cast of characters which embodied the personalities of contemporary world leaders in the time that the picture was made, intended prophetically to be between the then "Now and Later." The storyline saw the characters weaving ominous plans into their insane action. These story elements were designed to be revealed with both wit and style, and what the audience is suppose to see, was meant to be both funny and scary.
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Debut produced screenplay of novelist Charles McCarry, who co-wrote the film with Richard Brooks, from his novel "The Better Angels" (1979). This is the only screenplay written by McCarry.
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Richard Brooks described this movie during the time it was made and released, as "a movie about the craziness of today. It enables you to laugh at the insanity that is about to explode the world".
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The production notes for this picture stated: "Political double-talk and double-think, dirty tricks, hidden microphones, spy satellites, huggings in the Oval Office, international conflict. Academy Award winner Richard Brooks, the producer-writer-director of "Wrong Is Right," has woven these frightening realities into a terse, swiftly-paced movie. He takes the harsh truths of our modern world and turns them into a comedy about half-past tomorrow's insanity".
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The drama of the film is played out in several international locales such as Washington, New York, Marseilles, Rome, and throughout the desert capitals of the oil-rich Middle East, where wild plots and power-ploys become daily headlines. Countries from across North Africa, and those deep in the heart of Europe were swept up into the action with breathtaking speed as events of the film comically and fearfully unfolded. A panorama of the day's world and that time's tomorrow's world provided the backdrop for a story that was intended to transform intrigue into hilarity and truth into terror.
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First theatrical movie from Richard Brooks since Looking for Mr. Goodbar (1977).
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Publicity for this picture in its production notes declared that the result of such careful research for the picture was evident in the film, and that "behind the scenes intrigue in the movie" had already "found their parallels in real life" maintaining that "front page news" had "paraphrased Brooks' script".
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Penultimate theatrical movie of Richard Brooks, whose final film would be Fever Pitch (1985).
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The English home video release versions entitled "The Man with the Deadly Lens" were cut first by two seconds, then re-released cut by seven seconds to reduce footage of a bomb being made from a light bulb. However, the UK DVD released in 2004 entitled "Wrong is Right" is apparently uncut.
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This movie was re-titled from 'Wrong Is Right' to 'The Man With The Deadly Lens' in mostly English speaking territories after this film failed at the box-office in the U.S.
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One of this movie's main posters was designed in painted artwork, featuring Sean Connery standing in a James Bond-like pose with a television camera, instead of a gun, and with two girls in bikinis at his feet. In the background, inside a circle (evoking a gun barrel), were two scenes of action, while in the air above, was a spy satellite. All these elements were typical of the James Bond movie franchise, of which Connery had been a big part. This was not the original poster for this movie. The Bond-type poster was used in various non-U.S. markets, replacing the original poster, after the film was a commercial failure in North America. This was the second 'Sean Connery non-Bond film to have a Bond-like poster in just a few years, as the main movie poster for Cuba (1979), was also designed like a Bond movie poster.
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This movie was made and released three years after its source novel, "The Better Angels", was published.
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This movie's retitling from 'Wrong Is Right' to 'The Man With The Deadly Lens', in English speaking territories, was to connect this movie with the James Bond franchise. The new title connected most obviously with The Man with the Golden Gun (1974). Although, Connery did not star as James Bond in that movie, Roger Moore did.
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'Variety' called this movie "Richard Brooks' shriek of protest at what he sees as the insane, downward spiral of world history over the past decade."
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Final film as a producer for Richard Brooks, and penultimate film for him as writer and director. His last film would be Fever Pitch (1985).
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One of several movies, made during the 1980s, that looked at Middle Eastern politics and/or the Israeli-Palestine conflict. The films included The Soldier (1982), Wrong Is Right (1982), The Delta Force (1986), Deadline (1987), Screen Two: The Impossible Spy (1987), The Glory Boys (1984), Hanna K. (1983), and The Little Drummer Girl (1984).
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Final theatrically released Hollywood movie for Hardy Krüger.
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This movie features a gag that spoofs Lawrence of Arabia (1962), when former James Bond Sean Connery is in the desert, music score from that movie is sampled. The Spy Who Loved Me (1977) did this gag five years earlier, with Roger Moore as James Bond.
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One of two cinema movies that Sean Connery starred in that were first released in the year of 1982. The movies are Wrong Is Right (1982) and Five Days One Summer (1982).
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Two actors who have played James Bond, Roger Moore and Sean Connery, have both starred in comedy movies featuring arms dealing, they being That Lucky Touch (1975) and Wrong Is Right (1982) respectively, the two pictures being first released about 007 years apart.
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This movie's original American movie poster showed Sean Connery in the foreground with an atomic bomb exploding into a mushroom cloud in the background. Several Hollywood movie's made during the early 1980s, covered the subject of nuclear war. Other films made during the 1980s, which depicted mushroom clouds featured on their posters, included The Day After (1983) (theatrical release), One Night Stand (1984), and The Atomic Cafe (1982).
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This movie has been likened to Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964), due to it being a dark satire on the subject of nuclear warfare. Moreover, Mary Ann Brussat and Frederic Brussat at the "Spirituality and Practice" website say that "Wrong is Right (the title included) resonates with George Orwell's black comic novel 1984." (See also Nineteen Eighty-Four (1984)).
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Portraying Patrick Hale in this movie, Sean Connery would later go on to play another character also called Patrick, but with the name as a middle name, playing John Patrick Mason in The Rock (1996).
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Some movie posters for the picture featured a long text preamble that read: "In a moment World War III . . . but first a word from our sponsor. Patrick Hale was invented for television. He's a superstar TV reporter whose special news broadcasts reach a billion people every day. And in the past ten hours, he has uncovered the most incredible story of his career. THE BAD NEW IS: it involves the President, Vice-President, Director of the CIA, a trigger-happy general, an Arab terrorist, a European arms dealer, religious fanatics, and the result may be World War III. THE GOOD NEWS IS: his ratings are going through the roof. WRONG IS RIGHT. A very funny look at the world."
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