The Thing
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The Thing (1982) More at IMDbPro »


2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2006 | 2004

1-20 of 51 items from 2015   « Prev | Next »


Round-Up: Shout! Factory TV’s Summer of Fear, Cthulhu Idol Vinyl Bank, The Last Survivors Blu-ray / DVD

4 July 2015 7:48 AM, PDT | DailyDead | See recent DailyDead news »

Shout! Factory TV is spreading fear all summer long with a plethora of classic films including John Carpenter and Tobe Hooper's Body Bags. Also: a Cthulhu Vinyl Bank from Diamond Select Toys and Blu-ray and DVD release details for The Last Survivors.

Shout! Factory TV's Summer of Fear: Press Release: "This July, summer hats up with a plethora of new programming on Shout! Factory TV that is sure to beat those binge cravings. Shout! Factory TV is unveiling Summer of Fear, a fright fest sure to please! A collection of classic horror films debut this month, featuring Body Bags, Day of the Dead, Night of the Demons, Q: The Winged Serpent, The Final Terror and many more.

Shout! Factory TV grants an insider’s insight into these films with the premiere of audio commentaries on the streaming service. This month, directors John Carpenter, George A. Romero, Kevin Tenney, »

- Tamika Jones

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‘Terminator’ is still the best film James Cameron has directed

2 July 2015 5:42 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Terminator

Directed by James Cameron

Written by James Cameron and Gale Anne Hurd

1984, USA

In 1984, James Cameron released his sci-fi thriller The Terminator: the story of a killer cyborg sent from the future, and programmed to kill the mother of a future rebel chief. Arnold Schwarzenegger is the automated hit man roaming around present-day Los Angeles to eliminate Sarah Connor (Linda Hamilton). Her only hope is the guerrilla fighter Kyle Reese (Michael Biehn) who has followed the killer machine back through time in order to protect her. Terminator has long staked its claim as a classic for the ages (The Library of Congress even added it to its National Film Registry in 2008) and three decades later, Termiantor is still the best film James Cameron has directed, a resourceful low-budget thriller that recalls the canny exploitation work of George Miller and John Carpenter. While the film made a considerable profit for Orion Pictures, »

- Ricky

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DVD Review: 'It Follows'

29 June 2015 4:00 AM, PDT | CineVue | See recent CineVue news »

★★★★☆ Boiling terror down to essentials can be a winning formula for horror films: the phone call in Scream (1996), or the video tape in The Ring (1998). Perhaps, the best example is John Carpenter's 1982 remake The Thing, with its shape-shifting alien lurking amidst the blank spaces of Antarctica. With a similarly unspecific title, David Robert Mitchell's It Follows (2014) has the kind of barebones high concept that is beguiling in its simplicity and is realized in a rich and artful manner. Jay Height (Maika Monroe) is a young college student, living in Michigan, hanging out with her friends, drifting, a kind of sad thoughtful beauty.

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- CineVue UK

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What Scares You?

24 June 2015 10:47 PM, PDT | MoreHorror | See recent MoreHorror news »

Written by Tom Wood

MoreHorror.com

What, who, why or even how did your fascination with Horror begin? I will give you a minute to think whilst I set the scene. The other day, I was driving my car to work; A journey that has been done a thousand times before and as a result, it has become so tedious; so pathetically boring; I could probably do it with my eyes closed and without thinking (not that I will of course, that would just be plain dangerous on so many levels); But my point is, whilst I was driving, a question, not just any old question, but that question popped and buried itself deep into the back of my head. A simple question of What made me interested in Horror? Had evolved and mutated like a diseased zombie into further questioning and so forth, that in the end, a whole »

- admin

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‘Tales From the Crypt’ Volume 1 The early days of the horror icon crawl back from the grave

22 June 2015 7:10 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Few comics sit at the intersection of “fan beloved,” “industry defining,” and “absolutely impossible to acquire” the way the EC Comics library does. For a while they almost felt like Comics’ very own Holy Grail. On one hand, you’ve got the Tales From The Crypt brand itself, which has left an indelible mark on pop culture with films, cable TV series, Saturday morning cartoons, and a line of revival graphic novels from Papercutz — a proud legacy, to be sure. But on the other hand, you enter into the more nebulous region of pop cultural osmosis, and it’s there that the legend of Bill Gaines’ little comic line that could grows to gargantuan levels. The baby boomers that ate his ghoulish “mags” up in the early ‘50s eventually grew into the genre fiction movers and shakers of the ‘70s and ‘80s — from cult directors like George Romero and Joe Dante, »

- Luke Dorian Blackwood

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Cocoon Turns 30: Ron Howard’s Fable is Still an Ageless Sci-Fi Classic

21 June 2015 12:38 PM, PDT | DailyDead | See recent DailyDead news »

Death is inevitable. That’s a universal truth we all learn at a very early age and as we get older, the reality of that truism becomes more and more evident with each passing day. But what if you didn’t have to die? What if you could live forever? That wish fulfillment was precisely what a then up-and-coming filmmaker Ron Howard explored back in 1985 with his wondrous fable, Cocoon. It’s a remarkable film for many reasons, but what has always made it so memorable for me was the way Howard managed to create such a vivid, dignifying and endearing portrait of octogenarian life that demonstrated how the elderly can still enjoy a fulfilling existence even if the rest of the world no longer recognizes their vitality.

This month, Howard’s wondrously heartfelt fable turns 30 and it feels like the perfect time celebrate this remarkably unique film that defied the odds for many reasons, »

- Heather Wixson

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Hey, Toronto! Win Tickets To See John Carpenter's Big Trouble In Little China On The Big Screen!

17 June 2015 10:30 AM, PDT | Twitch | See recent Twitch news »

Hey, Toronto! The Twitch-curated Russellmania: The Legend Of Kurt Russell retrospective continues at the Tiff Bell Lightbox this week with a June 20th screening of John Carpenter's classic Big Trouble In Little China! And we want to give you tickets! A loudmouth trucker (Kurt Russell) is plunged into a world of supernatural weirdness beneath the streets of San Francisco's Chinatown, in John Carpenter's cult chop-socky fantasy adventure. While Russell and director John Carpenter had gone to the dark side with their previous collaborations Escape from New York and The Thing, they took a turn for the seriously silly with this chop-socky fantasy adventure. Russell plays big-rig driver Jack Burton, a hilariously inept blowhard of an anti-hero who is plunged into supernatural weirdness when his buddy's...

[Read the whole post on twitchfilm.com...]

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100 Essential Action Scenes: Attacks!

11 June 2015 8:00 AM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Sound on Sight undertook a massive project, compiling ranked lists of the most influential, unforgettable, and exciting action scenes in all of cinema. There were hundreds of nominees spread across ten different categories and a multi-week voting process from 11 of our writers. The results: 100 essential set pieces, sequences, and scenes from blockbusters to cult classics to arthouse obscurities.

If you’ve seen a film montage in the last 10 years, then you’ve been witness to at least one of the scenes mentioned on this list: the vibrating water glass from Jurassic Park signaling the T-Rex prowling nearby. It’s the perfect type of image to tell the audience: something is coming. These flashes of exhilaration are fan-favorites, and it’s no surprise to see them featured prominently as the centerpieces for some of the greatest films ever. It’s the invasion when the aliens come out of the sky, the »

- Shane Ramirez

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Hey, Toronto! Win Tickets To See John Carpenter's The Thing On The Big Screen!

11 June 2015 7:30 AM, PDT | Twitch | See recent Twitch news »

We love us some Kurt Russell here at Twitch so we are beyond proud to be presenting the twelve film RussellMania retrospective at the Tiff Bell Lightbox kicking off this coming Saturday, June 13th with John Carpenter's classic The Thing playing on the big screen from 35mm.The second, and far more faithful, adaptation of John W. Campbell's story "Who Goes There?" (following Howard Hawks' classic 1951 version), John Carpenter's masterwork is one of the greatest (and most gruesome) horror films of all time. After a bizarre run-in with a fleeing husky and a helicopter full of manic, trigger-happy Norwegians, the crew of an American research station in the snowy wastes of Antarctica realizes that they have been invaded by a deadly alien parasite which can...

[Read the whole post on twitchfilm.com...]

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You’ve got a T-Rex? Six of the most believable cinematic creations

11 June 2015 5:00 AM, PDT | The Hollywood News | See recent The Hollywood News news »

To celebrate the release of Jurassic World, in cinemas now across the globe, I’ve decided to take a trip through 5 of my favourite on-screen creations that have defied the laws of supposed reality. We’re talking those creatures that capture the imagination when they’re first seen but also made you disregard that they weren’t even real.

Let’s begin…

6. Caesar from Rise of the Planet of the Apes (2011) (Dir. Rupert Wyatt)

I must admit my movie mind was cautious before the re-launch of another Apes saga but once you see Wyatt’s version that came complete with Andy Serkis’ Imaginarium monkey, sorry Ape, Caesar, then the game was changed forever.

Caesar is an exceptional creation and not just as they’ve given us the believability factor but because it’s done with all the correct intentions. Gone are the days where we know there are humans under the suits, »

- Dan Bullock

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Celebrating the subversive, surreal Society

4 June 2015 2:59 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Brian Yuzna's 1989 horror Society is out on Blu-ray from Arrow Films. Ryan takes a look back at a grotesque satire...

Bill Whitney’s just an ordinary American high school kid. Sure, he may live in a Beverly Hills mansion. He might drive a brand new Jeep to the beach. But deep down, he has the same hang-ups as most teenagers: he distrusts authority, resents his parents, and suspects that he might actually be adopted.

Gradually, however, we suspect that there might be something more to Billy’s paranoid fantasies than raging hormones - his parents really do seem to be up to something sinister - something to do with private parties, naked orgies, and shunting...

"We're just one big happy family... except for a little incest and psychosis"

Society stars Billy Warlock, a young actor fresh from TV shows like Days Of Our Lives. If this were a straight drama, »

- ryanlambie

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Dwayne Johnson in Talks to Star in Big Trouble In Little China Remake

1 June 2015 3:32 PM, PDT | Collider.com | See recent Collider.com news »

Add Big Trouble in Little China to the list of John Carpenter films getting the remake treatment. Halloween, The Fog, and Assault on Precinct 13 all received remakes, The Thing was a prequel/remake, and a remake of Escape from New York is in active development. All of the originals hold up, but I’m willing to entertain the possibility of a successful Big Trouble in Little China remake if Dwayne Johnson is on board. According to The Wrap, Johnson is in talks to star in and produce the Big Trouble in Little China remake. X-Men: First Class writers Ashley Miller and Zack Stentz will write the script, which will have Johnson taking on the role of Jack Burton, “an All-American trucker who gets dragged into a centuries-old mystical battle in San Francisco’s Chinatown.” [caption id="attachment_252765" align="alignright" width="350"] Image via Universal Pictures[/caption] A remake of Big Trouble in Little China will be a tricky balancing act. »

- Matt Goldberg

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The unlikeliest action star: Kurt Russell in the 80s

23 May 2015 8:59 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Bob Hauk: Remember, once you’re inside you’re on your own.

Snake Plissken: Oh, you mean I can’t count on you?

Bob Hauk: No.

Snake Plissken: Good!

Escape from New York

Somewhere between Sylvester Stallone and Arnold Schwarzenegger, the 80s had another action star, one that wasn’t unintelligible, one that had far fewer muscles and seemed downright average in comparison to Arnie and Sly. With three movies in a six year span Kurt Russell became America’s biggest cult badass.

First came arguably his toughest tough guy Snake Plissken in 1981’s Escape from New York. It’s hard to beat an eye patch and an abdomen snake tattoo. Plissken, a cocky prisoner, is tasked with rescuing the kidnapped President in the collapsed, criminal run New York. Following Escape from New York was Carpenter’s 1982 terrifying alien invasion remake of The Thing and finally Big Trouble in Little China »

- Tressa

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The 13 Most Pointless Horror Movie Remakes Ever Made

19 May 2015 10:00 AM, PDT | Moviefone | See recent Moviefone news »

The remake of '80s fight fest "Poltergeist" hits theaters this Friday: Can it match the original? Seems doubtful, since horror remakes so seldom deliver.

Occasionally, a remake raises the bar and becomes an entirely new film: Case in point, John Carpenter's now-classic shape-shifting alien thriller "The Thing" (1982), a gorier and more psychological remake of the Howard Hawks film "The Thing From Another World" (1951). But revisiting a classic is usually just a waste of time. Even if the remake is halfway watchable, wouldn't you rather just see the original again?

Here are some of the most unnecessary horror remakes of all time. (We're not including the 2011 version of "The Thing" since, even though it's pretty pointless, it was a prequel, not a remake.) »

- Sharon Knolle

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John Carpenter’s The Thing Midnights This Weekend at The Tivoli

17 May 2015 8:37 PM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

“I know you gentlemen have been through a lot, but when you find the time, I’d rather not spend the rest of this winter Tied To This Fucking Couch!”

John Carpenter’s The Thing screens midnights this weekend (May 22nd and 23rd) at The Tivoli Theater as part of their ‘Reel Late at The Tivoli’ Midnight Series.

I won’t go into my usual retrospective because everyone has seen it many times, but I will share my The Thing story: I saw it the day it opened (June 25th 1982). My mother’s friend Marilyn came over in the morning so she and mom could go shopping. She brought her 9-year old Grandson Michael with her and handed me a $10 bill and said “Go take Michael to see E.T. The Extra-terrestrial (which had opened two weeks earlier) so he’s out of my hair while your mother and I »

- Tom Stockman

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'Hateful Eight' Photos Tease Deadly Standoff in Tarantino's Western

8 May 2015 10:39 PM, PDT | MovieWeb | See recent MovieWeb news »

Just hours after The Hateful Eight character portraits debuted, we have even more images from director Quentin Tarantino's Western. These photos also include commentary with the cast members, who offer new insight into their characters in The Hateful Eight. With all of these photos debuting over the past few days, hopefully we'll get to see the first full trailer sometime soon, since the Western debuts in just six short months.

Set six or eight or twelve years after the Civil War, a stagecoach hurtles through the wintry Wyoming landscape. The passengers, bounty hunter John Ruth (Kurt Russell) and his fugitive Daisy Domergue (Jennifer Jason Leigh), race towards the town of Red Rock where Ruth, known in these parts as "The Hangman," will bring Domergue to justice. Along the road, they encounter two strangers: Major Marquis Warren (Samuel L. Jackson), a black former union soldier turned infamous bounty hunter, and »

- MovieWeb

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The top 25 underappreciated films of 1988

6 May 2015 6:00 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Our look at underappreciated films of the 80s continues, as we head back to 1988...

Either in terms of ticket sales or critical acclaim, 1988 was dominated by the likes of Rain Man, Who Framed Roger Rabbit and Coming To America. It was the year Bruce Willis made the jump from TV to action star with Die Hard, and became a star in the process.

It was the year Leslie Nielsen made his own jump from the small to silver screen with Police Squad spin-off The Naked Gun, which sparked a hugely popular franchise of its own. Elsewhere, the eccentric Tim Burton scored one of the biggest hits of the year with Beetlejuice, the success of which would result in the birth of Batman a year later. And then there was Tom Cruise, who managed to make a drama about a student-turned-barman into a $170m hit, back when $170m was still an »

- ryanlambie

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9 incredible low-budget science fiction movies: Moon, Monsters, Primer

2 May 2015 1:30 AM, PDT | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - Movie News news »

The advent of nimble digital cameras and cutting edge visual effects has meant that filmmakers have been able to mount increasingly ambitious sci-fi stories on relatively small budgets.

This week sees the release of Monsters: Dark Continent, a follow-up to Gareth Edwards' brilliant 2010 debut Monsters. Not only did Monsters shoot Edwards to the big time, putting him in the director's chair for Godzilla and next year's Star Wars: Rogue One, but it also only cost less than $500,000 to make.

Below, we look at 11 incredible science fiction movies that prove you can make a great movie for just a fraction of what Avengers: Age of Ultron cost ($280 million, apparently!).

Dark Star (1974)

Production budget: $60,000

How many could you make for the price of Avengers: 4666

Why it's essential viewing: Before he made his trio of classics Assault on Precinct 13, Halloween and The Thing, John Carpenter directed this trippy sci-fi about »

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What was the best year in film history? HitFix readers continue the debate

1 May 2015 6:36 PM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

HitFix's recent spate of "Best Year in Film History" pieces inevitably spurred some furious debate among our readers, with some making compelling arguments for years not included in our pieces (2007 and 1968 were particularly popular choices) and others openly expressing their bewilderment at the inclusion of others (let's just say 2012 took a beating). In the interest of giving voice to your comments, below we've rounded up a few of the most thoughtful, passionate, surprising and occasionally incendiary responses to our pieces, including my own (I advocated for The Year of Our Lynch 2001, which is obviously the best). Here we go... Superstar commenter "A History of Matt," making an argument for 1968: The Graduate. Bullit. The Odd Couple. The Lion in Winter. Planet of the Apes. The Thomas Crown Affair. Funny Girl. Rosemary's Baby. And of course, 2001, A Space Odyssey. And that's only a taste of the greatness of that year. "Lothar the Flatulant, »

- Chris Eggertsen

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Revisiting John Carpenter's 'Prince of Darkness'

1 May 2015 8:51 AM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

Carpenter’s screenplay is even credited to “Martin Quatermass”. Priest Donald Pleasence discovers an ancient canister full of liquid Evil which “broadcasts” warnings from the future. Or something. Given total creative freedom due to the low budget, this is probably Carpenter’s most off the wall picture, the middle entry in his “Apocalypse Trilogy” which includes his "The Thing" and "In the Mouth of Madness." »

- Trailers From Hell

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