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Jason Patric to Star in Wayward Pines Season 2

This summer, Fox's Wayward Pines is back for a second season with a star-studded cast which now includes Jason Patric (The Lost Boys, Narc).

Press Release: Jason Patric (“Rush,” “Narc”) has been cast in a leading role in Wayward Pines, the hit psychological thriller event series returning for a second season this summer on Fox. Patric will portray Dr. Theo Yedlin, a confident, driven surgeon whose leadership skills will prove invaluable to the residents of Wayward Pines.

From executive producer M. Night Shyamalan (“The Sixth Sense,” “The Visit”) and based on the world created by author Blake Crouch in his international best-selling series of books, the 10-episode, second season will pick up after the shocking events of Season One, with the residents of Wayward Pines battling against the iron-fisted rule of the First Generation. Dr. Theo Yedlin – a new resident of Wayward Pines – awakens from suspended animation and finds himself
See full article at DailyDead »

How Jim Gaffigan learned to say no to network sitcoms

  • Hitfix
How Jim Gaffigan learned to say no to network sitcoms
Fifteen years ago, Jim Gaffigan was yet another young stand-up comic riding the conveyer belt from the comedy clubs to a network sitcom in the wake of the success of Jerry Seinfeld, Ray Romano, Tim Allen, and more. His CBS sitcom "Welcome to New York" was designed as a vehicle for him, but somewhere between the start of development and when it hit the air, the focus shifted to co-star Christine Baranski, an Emmy winner for CBS' "Cybill." It turned out to be a good showcase for neither, and produced only 13 episodes before calling it quits. That wasn't the end of Jim Gaffigan, sitcom actor, but for a long time, it was the end of Jim Gaffigan, aspiring sitcom star. He took jobs on other people's shows ("The Ellen Show," "My Boys") and largely focused on his food-obsessed comedy act (like his famous routine about Hot Pockets). Given how well
See full article at Hitfix »

Richard Dysart, Emmy-Winning ‘L.A. Law’ Actor, Dies at 86

Richard Dysart, Emmy-Winning ‘L.A. Law’ Actor, Dies at 86
Richard Dysart, a stage and screen actor known best for his performance as Leland McKenzie in the NBC legal drama “L.A. Law,” died Sunday in his home in Santa Monica. He was 86.

Dysart was born in Boston and raised in Maine. In the 1950s, he got his start in radio and worked at New York’s off-Broadway Circle in the Square Theatre.

He was a founding member of the American Conservatory Theater in the 60s, and played roles on Broadway throughout his career in “All in Good Time,” “The Little Foxes” and “A Place Without Doors.” His performance in “That Championship Season” for his role of the Coach which he created won him a Drama Desk Award in 1972.

In “L.A. Law” Dysart played patriarchal law firm partner LeLand McKenzie. The series aired for eight seasons from 1986-1994. Dysart’s performance earned him a primetime Emmy in 1992.

Dysart’s film appearances
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Richard Dysart, Emmy-Winning ‘L.A. Law’ Actor, Dies at 86

Richard Dysart, Emmy-Winning ‘L.A. Law’ Actor, Dies at 86
Richard Dysart, a stage and screen actor known best for his performance as Leland McKenzie in the NBC legal drama “L.A. Law,” died Sunday in his home in Santa Monica. He was 86.

Dysart was born in Boston and raised in Maine. In the 1950s, he got his start in radio and worked at New York’s off-Broadway Circle in the Square Theatre.

He was a founding member of the American Conservatory Theater in the 60s, and played roles on Broadway throughout his career in “All in Good Time,” “The Little Foxes” and “A Place Without Doors.” His performance in “That Championship Season” for his role of the Coach which he created won him a Drama Desk Award in 1972.

In “L.A. Law” Dysart played patriarchal law firm partner LeLand McKenzie. The series aired for eight seasons from 1986-1994. Dysart’s performance earned him a primetime Emmy in 1992.

Dysart’s film appearances
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Richard Dysart, the Patriarchal Senior Partner of 'L.A. Law,' Dies at 86

Richard Dysart, the Patriarchal Senior Partner of 'L.A. Law,' Dies at 86
Richard Dysart, the Emmy-winning actor who portrayed the cranky senior partner Leland McKenzie in the slick, long-running NBC drama L.A. Law, has died. He was 86. Dysart, who also played Coach in the original 1972 Broadway production of Jason Miller’s Pulitzer Prize-winning That Championship Season, died Sunday at home in Santa Monica after a long illness, his wife, artist Kathryn Jacobi, told The Hollywood Reporter. The acclaimed L.A. Law — created by Steven Bochco (who eventually handed off the series to David E. Kelley) and Terry Louise Fisher — aired for eight seasons from 1986

read more
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Menachem Golan, Who Headed Cannon Films, Dies at 85

Menachem Golan, the colorful, free-spending Israeli-born producer and director whose Cannon Films yielded hundreds of productions starring the likes of Sylvester Stallone and Chuck Norris before going bust, died Friday in Israel, according to Haaretz. He was 85.

Golan, whose first name is sometimes spelled Menahem, was famous for his overblown pronouncements and business plans, and partnered for many years with his cousin, Yoram Globus. The duo started their U.S. career making fast-paced action exploitation titles starring the likes of Norris and Charles Bronson. Then, in the ’80s, Golan and Globus headed the ill-fated public company Cannon Entertainment, which began spending more on films such as “A Cry in the Dark,” “Cobra,” “Sahara” (1983), “Over the Top” and “Bolero” with such actors as Stallone, Brooke Shields and Bo Derek.

For a decade Golan dominated the market portion of the Cannes Film Festival, booking hundreds of pages a day in trade papers
See full article at Variety - Film News »

'Mighty Ducks' oral history: What we learned

'Mighty Ducks' oral history: What we learned
Believe it or not, it has been 20 years since The Mighty Ducks graced your movie screens (for the second time). And in honor of the movie that inspired us all to attempt ice skating and say “Quack” repeatedly, Time caught up with those involved for a full oral history of the franchise.

Here’s what we learned:

The first draft was much darker. “The draft I wrote in that apartment was much darker,” writer Steve Brill said. “It wasn’t a Disney movie. There weren’t murders or anything, but there was some adult romance. And a lot of hockey
See full article at EW.com - PopWatch »

'90s kids classic Mighty Ducks could get a fourth movie

'90s kids classic Mighty Ducks could get a fourth movie
The Mighty Ducks, the '90s ice hockey kids movie franchise, might be revived for a fourth movie, according to producer Jordan Kerner.

During an extensive discussion about the 20th anniversary of D2: The Mighty Ducks with Time, Kerner said that Disney has approached him about a follow-up movie, but said that he was still trying to find the right story to tell.

"There have been a number of times that we have discussed with the studio the idea of either bringing it back and bringing it back possibly with one or two of the guys who are now in their thirties as the coaches, and having a few more of them be their friends in their lives and having the kids come back," said Kerner.

"And I've been pitched a story two or three times. It hasn't been the right story yet, but the idea of doing that is
See full article at Digital Spy - Movie News »

'The Exorcist': 25 Things You Didn't Know About the Terrifying Horror Classic

"The Exorcist," released 40 years ago this week (on December 26, 1973), is widely regarded as the scariest movie ever made, but after four decades, two sequels, two prequels, and countless spoofs, is there anything about the tale of demon-possessed Regan MacNeil (Linda Blair) and the priests who try to save her (Max von Sydow and Jason Miller) left to jolt and shock us?

Maybe there is. "Exorcist" director William Friedkin's 2013 memoir, "The Friedkin Connection," has three chapters full of dish on the making of the film, including which characters were based on famous people, how some of the famous special effects were accomplished, how he came to slap a Jesuit priest, and whether or not the production was cursed. Here are 25 things you may not know about "The Exorcist," many of them from Friedkin's recent book.

1. The real case that inspired William Peter Blatty's novel and screenplay was the 1949 exorcism of a 14-year-old boy,
See full article at Moviefone »

Nebraska – review

Bruce Dern is at the top of his game in Alexander Payne's road movie about a father and son's quest for riches

When putting together his critically acclaimed neo-noir thriller After Dark, My Sweet, James Foley instructed his casting director to "go find me a Bruce Dern type" for the crucial role of Uncle Bud, a retired cop whose avuncular manner masks an undercurrent of psychosis. For three months, a succession of hopeful players was brought to Foley's attention but all fell short of the mark, none possessing the necessary blend of twinkling intensity and barely repressed craziness. In the end, exasperated, the casting director made a startling suggestion: "Why don't you just get Bruce Dern?"

Having worked with directors such as Alfred Hitchcock, Elia Kazan, Bob Rafelson, Roger Corman and Hal Ashby, Dern had earned himself a reputation in the 1960s and 1970s as a purveyor of wild-eyed rebels,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

AFI Fest 2013 Highlight: Veteran Dern Tribute at Chinese Theatre on Monday

Bruce Dern in ‘Nebraska’: AFI Fest 2013 highlight The Los Angeles-based AFI Fest, which kicked off last Thursday, November 7, 2013, continues until next Thursday. On Monday, November 11, the highlight of AFI Fest 2013 is Alexander Payne’s Nebraska (7:00 p.m. at Tcl Chinese Theatre), likely to earn a Best Actor Academy Award nomination for veteran Bruce Dern, who earlier this year took home the Best Actor Award at the Cannes Film Festival. (Photo: Bruce Dern, Will Forte in Nebraska.) Set in Kentucky (kidding), Nebraska accompanies an elderly man (Dern) and his son (Will Forte) as they travel from Billings, Montana, to Lincoln, Nebraska, so he can collect sweepstakes prize money he believes he has won. In sum, Nebraska is what’s called a Road Movie, in which the Road is a metaphor for Life. Shades of brothers Dustin Hoffman and Tom Cruise getting to know one another in Barry Levinson’s Rain Man,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Photo Blast From The Past: Jason Patric

Today, we're featuring Jason Patric circa 1986. In 2005, Patric appeared on Broadway as 'Brick' in a revival of Tennessee Williams' Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, opposite starred Ashley Judd, Ned Beatty and Margo Martindale. He next appeared on Broadway opposite Brian Cox, Chris Noth, Kiefer Sutherland and Jim Gaffigan in a revival of his father Jason Miller's play, That Championship Season, which began previews on February 9, 2011 and closed on May 29, 2011.
See full article at BroadwayWorld.com »

Interview: Comedian Jim Gaffigan in Chicago for ‘Dad is Fat’

Chicago – The hilarious comedy of Jim Gaffigan is about to go beyond Hot Pockets. Gaffigan will be in the Chicago area on May 8th and 9th, 2013, to promote his very first book, “Dad is Fat,” in which he applies his keen observational powers through his experience in being a father of five children.

Jim Gaffigan is hugely popular for his riffs on the American obsession with convenience foods, and hearing his Hot Pockets routine just once will have you humming the famous jingle for days (“Hot Pockets!”). Gaffigan grew up as the youngest of six siblings in Chesterton, Indiana, but began his stand-up career in New York City. He honed his act to feature his signature bits on food, and his Comedy Central specials (“Beyond the Pale,” “King Baby”) have been major blockbusters. He also has made several movies, including the recent “Away We Go” (2009), and spent three seasons on
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

Feature: Jane Lynch, Paul Sorvino at 2013 Chicago Film Critics Awards Press Conference

Chicago – As the stars, presenters and award recipients gathered at the Chicago Film Critics Awards on February 9th, they took some time out to mix with the media at a pre-show press conference. Jane Lynch, Paul Sorvino, Joe Piscopo, Nadine Velazquez, Regina Taylor and the other award winners offered their perspectives.

HollywoodChicago.com’s Brian Tallerico, Patrick McDonald and Matt Fagerholm covered the presser, and contributed several questions asked to the awards show participants. Photographer Joe Arce captured his stellar portraits at the event. Below is a summary of the afternoon’s best.

Jane Lynch, Recipient of “Comedia Extrarodinaire”

Accepting this year’s award for Comedia Extraordinaire was the incomparable Jane Lynch, the Chicago-bred actress who achieved mega-stardom with her portrayal of Sue Sylvester, the bullying high school coach on “Glee.” It was a role impeccably designed for Lynch’s uproarious wit and deadpan timing, which she cultivated in a
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

Charles Durning: An appreciation of the SAG honoree

Charles Durning: An appreciation of the SAG honoree
Along with Jack Klugman, character actor Charles Durning also passed away on Christmas Eve. He died of natural causes at his New York City apartment at the age of 89. -Insertgroups:12- As with Klugman, his pursuit of acting had to be put on hold when he was drafted into the Us Army during World War II. Durning served with distinction, despite injuries that resulted in three Purple Hearts, winning both the Silver and Bronze stars for valor. On D-Day, June 6, 1944, he was wounded in the leg while in one of the first units to land on Omaha Beach. He went on to fight in the Battle of the Bulge and was captured by the Germans at one point. Following the war, he worked as a journeyman actor for decades, appearing in small roles in theater, film and television. His big breaks came one after the other in 1973. He was featured
See full article at Gold Derby »

Charles Durning obituary

Prolific American actor who was Oscar nominated for roles in The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas and To Be Or Not to Be

The American actor Charles Durning, who has died aged 89, first grabbed audience attention as the crooked Lieutenant Snyder in The Sting (1973). He makes an explosive appearance, tearing down an alley after the slick grifter played by Robert Redford, and repeatedly lurches out of the shadows throughout the rest of the film. Durning had only a handful of scenes, and over the next 40 years would seldom be granted more screen time in 200-odd film and TV roles. Nevertheless, his jowly face, with its boxer's nose and sly eyes, grew increasingly familiar, and his name in the opening titles usually promised good things ahead. His heavyset frame meant he was often cast as tough guys, but he later assumed more jovial roles, portraying Father Christmas several times.

His first
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Broadway dims its lights for Charles Durning on Thursday night

  • Pop2it
At exactly 8 p.m. Eastern on Thursday, Dec. 27, Broadway will dim its lights to honor Charles Durning, who died Monday at 89.

Though well known for TV's "Rescue Me" where he played Michael, Tommy's dad for seven years, and as the voice of Francis Griffin on "Family Guy" for a decade, Durning was a steady presence on Broadway since 1964 when he began as an understudy.

By 1972, however, he had a breakout role in "That Championship Season" as the self-promoting mayor.

Durning won a Tony Award in 1990 for his portrayal of Big Daddy in "Cat on a Hot Tin Roof."

The varied roles continued. And in 1996, Durning had a courtroom duel with George C. Scott -- consider the show of machismo on that stage -- in "Inherit the Wind." The next year he starred with Julie Harris in a Broadway revival of "The Gin Game."

His final Broadway appearance was at the kingmaker,
See full article at Pop2it »

Beloved Character Actor Charles Durning Dies At 89

Beloved Character Actor Charles Durning Dies At 89
Los Angeles — Charles Durning grew up in poverty, lost five of his nine siblings to disease, barely lived through D-Day and was taken prisoner at the Battle of the Bulge.

His hard life and wartime trauma provided the basis for a prolific 50-year career as a consummate Oscar-nominated character actor, playing everyone from a Nazi colonel to the pope to Dustin Hoffman's would-be suitor in "Tootsie."

Durning, who died Monday at age 89 in New York, got his start as an usher at a burlesque theater in Buffalo, N.Y. When one of the comedians showed up too drunk to go on, Durning took his place. He would recall years later that he was hooked as soon as he heard the audience laughing.

He told The Associated Press in 2008 that he had no plans to stop working. "They're going to carry me out, if I go," he said.

Durning's longtime agent and friend,
See full article at Huffington Post »

Charles Durning, king of character actors, dies in NYC

Charles Durning, king of character actors, dies in NYC
Charles Durning grew up in poverty, lost five of his nine siblings to disease, barely lived through D-Day and was taken prisoner at the Battle of the Bulge.

His hard life and wartime trauma provided the basis for a prolific 50-year career as a consummate Oscar-nominated character actor, playing everyone from a Nazi colonel to the pope to Dustin Hoffman’s would-be suitor in Tootsie.

Durning, who died Monday at age 89 in New York, got his start as an usher at a burlesque theater in Buffalo, N.Y. When one of the comedians showed up too drunk to go on,
See full article at EW.com - Inside Movies »

Charles Durning Dies

  • PEOPLE.com
Charles Durning Dies
Charles Durning, the versatile character actor whose friendly face and full form was recognizable to movie audiences since the mid-'70s, died of natural causes at his Manhattan home Dec. 24, his agent confirmed. He was 89. Among his roles: The corrupt cop in The Sting, the show-stopping Governor in Best Little Whorehouse in Texas (for which he was nominated for a Best Supporting Actor Oscar), Jessica Lange's father and Dustin Hoffman's love-smitten suitor in Tootsie, a buffoon of a German officer in To Be Or Not to Be (another Oscar nod) and Warren Beatty's law-enforcement boss in Dick Tracy. His range of real-life roles was even broader. Durning, a genuine World War II hero with the Purple Hearts to prove it, worked in a button factory, taught ballroom dancing, sung on radio, trained as a stockbroker and painted bridges. According to a 1990 People profile, at the time he played Big Daddy to Kathleen Turner's Maggie the Cat in a Broadway revival of Tennessee Williams's Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, During had been on his own since age 16, when he left home because his widowed mother, Louise, was having trouble supporting five kids on the money she earned laundering cadets' uniforms at West Point. (His father, an Army sergeant, died when Durning was 12.)
See full article at PEOPLE.com »
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