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Squizzy Taylor (1982) Poster

Trivia

It took David Atkins twelve tries to successfully throw the molotov cocktail bottle through the shop window.
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David Atkins was cast in the lead part as Squizzy Taylor because he resembled both Squizzy Taylor and James Cagney. Cagney was famous for playing gangsters.
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The meaning and relevance of this film's Squizzy Taylor (1982) title is that it refers to the nickname of a 1920s Australian gangster. Squizzy Taylor's actual full real name was Joseph Leslie Theodore Taylor. Taylor lived between 29 June 1888 and 27 October 1927.
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Squizzy's Taylor's nickname "Squizzy" is derived from the fact that Taylor had a left eyelid that was ulcerated and drooped hence he needed to "squint" or take a "squiz", the latter being an Australasian colloquial expression meaning to "take a quick close look". The term "squiz" is likely to have its origins from being derived from the word "squint" as one can "squint" when they have an eye or eyelid problem. 'Cassells' says that the word "squiz" dates back to the 1910s in Australian and New Zealand and the term "squiz" also pre-dates this time to pre-twentieth century Devon, England where its meaning was to "examine critically", 'Cassells' suggesting that the Devon use being its origin. It has been suggested that the word "squiz" was originally derived from the word "squint" or even could be an amalgam of both the words "quiz" and "squint". An alternative spelling of the word, "squizz", featured in New Zealand and Australia from the 1930s onwards.
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This movie is a semi-fictional biopic.
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This film is David Atkins only ever starring role in a theatrical film.
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Publicity for this film stated that this film was the "big-brother" of an earlier documentary, The Rise and Fall of Squizzy Taylor.
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This film was one of two Australian films made and released around 1982-1983 that were period gangster movies set in the 1920s. The other was Kitty and the Bagman (1983).
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David Atkins, who plays this film's central character, mostly works as a choreographer and director of major live events and not as a film actor.
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Publicity for this film stated: "Squizzy is essentially portrayed as he saw himself - as a cheeky, flashy little larrikin whose greatest crime was wanting to improve his lot. There is no attempt to glorify the criminal; simply a desire to humanize the man, to tell the story and to put him in the context of his times".
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This film is to date still David Atkins's last theatrical feature film.
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This movie's working title was 'Squizzy'.
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Final feature film of Australian actor Cul Cullen.
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