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Pink Floyd: The Wall (1982)

A confined but troubled rock star descends into madness in the midst of his physical and social isolation from everyone.

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(album "The Wall"), (screenplay)
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Won 2 BAFTA Film Awards. Another 1 win & 1 nomination. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
Christine Hargreaves ...
Pink's Mother
...
J.A. Pinkerton (Pink's Father)
Eleanor David ...
Kevin McKeon ...
...
David Bingham ...
...
Alex McAvoy ...
Teacher
Ellis Dale ...
English Doctor
James Hazeldine ...
Lover
Ray Mort ...
Playground Father
Margery Mason ...
Teacher's Wife (as Marjorie Mason)
Robert Bridges ...
American Doctor
...
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Storyline

The movie tells the story of rock singer "Pink" who is sitting in his hotel room in Los Angeles, burnt out from the music business and only able to perform on stage with the help of drugs. Based on the 1979 double album "The Wall" by Pink Floyd, the film begins in Pink's youth where he is crushed by the love of his mother. Several years later, he is punished by the teachers in school because he is starting to write poems. He slowly begins to build a wall around himself to be protected from the world outside. The film shows all this in massive and epic pictures until the very end where he tears down the wall and breaks free. Written by Harald Mayr <marvin@bike.augusta.de>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

The Music, The Nightmares, The Motion Picture See more »


Certificate:

R | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

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Language:

Release Date:

17 September 1982 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Pink Floyd The Wall  »

Box Office

Budget:

$12,000,000 (estimated)
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

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(70 mm prints)| (35 mm prints)| (some 35 mm prints)

Color:

(Metrocolor)

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The lyrics to "In The Flesh" mention a "surrogate band." At the original "The Wall" concerts, the opening song "In The Flesh?" was never played by Pink Floyd. Instead, other musicians played it wearing masks to make them look like the members of Pink Floyd. This was part of Roger's attack on what he felt was the separation between musicians and the audience that can happen at huge stadium shows, where it almost didn't matter who were on stage. See more »

Goofs

When Pink throws the television out the window before he cuts his hand, he mouths "Take that, fuckers!", but we hear "Next time, fuckers!" (This is corrected in the DVD release of "The Wall") See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Pink: [singing] So ya, thought ya might like to, go to the show. To feel the warm thrill of confusing that space cadet glow. Tell me is something eluding you sunshine? Is this not what you expected to see? If you wanna find out what's behind these cold eyes, you'll just have to claw your way through this disguise!
See more »

Connections

Features Puttin' on the Dog (1944) See more »

Soundtracks

What Shall We Do Now?
Written by Roger Waters
Performed by Pink Floyd
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
I had forgotten that this was the greatest movie ever made
15 October 2005 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

I recently rented and re-watched Pink Floyd The Wall for the 200th time, and I had forgotten, over the years, why this is my favorite movie. Surprisingly, the reason it is so good has little to do with a rock star having a mental breakdown. Pink being a rock star is almost incidental to the real message of the film. It seems as if director Parker took the initial idea of Pink Floyd's album and ran away with it. The film serves less as a study of one celebrity individual, instead serving as a cinematic indictment of all of our worst aspects as human beings: cruelty, brutality, insanity, herd mentality, fascism--all the most negative traits of twentieth century man are splashed upon the movie screen, as if the Director was asking the audience "Why?" This is a film in rebellion against the status quo. Funny then, that it should be driven by the music of a major rock and roll band. But, all in all, that is besides the point. The film of the Wall begins and ends with scenes of oppression by authoritarian figures (police men, skinheads, teachers, etc.)It is almost as if the entire sub textual content of the film is drawing a parallel between the internal alienation of a single individual and the social and global alienation that fostered the cruelties of World War 2, the holocaust, ad infinitum. Pinks degeneration is the degeneration of Everyman, confronted by a world that is (still) spinning increasingly out of control, away from the light, further behind the wall of its own nihilistic will toward self-obliteration. The violence of the imagery, the final "Trial", and the psychic attack of the final montage of disturbing images (masked children put into a meat grinder, cartoon teachers becoming hammers, neo-Nazis on a rampage) as the scene fades into a blank grey wall, are grand, satirical, operatic "Theater of Cruelty" in a cinematic framework. But it is the final lyric (sung by a repulsive, animated "Judge") that puts the entire scope of this picture into focus: "I sentence you to be EXPOSED before your peers..." The Judge , of course, is not merely talking to the fictional "Pink", but to the viewers of the film, and well, the entire world, for all that, and again, the Director has, seemingly, high jacked the "rock opera" format, and used it as a vehicle to ask that ultimate question: why is mankind so mutually interested in its own self-destruction? Why do nations and civilized cultures slide easily into fascistic thinking? How many war orphans are we still, to this day, creating?

I am not, now, a fan of Pink Floyd's music, although all of the music in this film is beyond excellent. Oddly enough, I am the farthest thing from the dope-smoking "hippy" that is supposed to be a Pink Floyd fan. I am an Industrial musician and a writer. My favorite music, at this point, is anything by NON, Throbbing Gristle, etc. This film has, over the years though, shaped my own artistic outlook in ways I am probably not even aware of. One does not need to smoke dope, or even be a Pink Floyd fan, to be affected quite deeply by this film. Roger Ebert once said that Star Wars was, to him at least "a perfect film". Well, Pink Floyd The Wall, to myself, is a perfect film, whether you are a pothead or no. I have given this film ten stars, but it is a little beyond that. If it was simply a rock movie, it could be rated in a conventional manner. But Allan Parker has done something here that is beyond even the concept of the bestselling album that this movie is based upon. He has crafted a surreal essay on the madness and self-destruction that lurks within the human spirit. And he has created one of the most sobering, angry, and dizzying satirical pieces ever committed to celluloid. In short, this film is a work of sheer, jaundiced brilliance.


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