8.0/10
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266 user 61 critic

Pink Floyd: The Wall (1982)

A confined but troubled rock star descends into madness in the midst of his physical and social isolation from everyone.

Director:

Writers:

(album "The Wall"), (screenplay)
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Popularity
3,362 ( 156)

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From $3.99 (SD) on Amazon Video

ON DISC
Won 2 BAFTA Film Awards. Another 1 win & 1 nomination. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
Christine Hargreaves ...
Pink's Mother
...
J.A. Pinkerton (Pink's Father)
Eleanor David ...
...
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David Bingham ...
...
...
Teacher
Ellis Dale ...
English Doctor
...
Lover
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Playground Father
Margery Mason ...
Teacher's Wife (as Marjorie Mason)
Robert Bridges ...
American Doctor
...
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Storyline

The movie tells the story of rock singer "Pink" who is sitting in his hotel room in Los Angeles, burnt out from the music business and only able to perform on stage with the help of drugs. Based on the 1979 double album "The Wall" by Pink Floyd, the film begins in Pink's youth where he is crushed by the love of his mother. Several years later, he is punished by the teachers in school because he is starting to write poems. He slowly begins to build a wall around himself to be protected from the world outside. The film shows all this in massive and epic pictures until the very end where he tears down the wall and breaks free. Written by Harald Mayr <marvin@bike.augusta.de>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

The Music, The Nightmares, The Motion Picture See more »


Certificate:

R | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

17 September 1982 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Pink Floyd The Wall  »

Box Office

Budget:

$12,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend:

$67,870 (USA) (8 August 1982)

Gross:

$22,244,207 (USA)
 »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(70 mm prints)| (35 mm prints)| (some 35 mm prints)

Color:

(Metrocolor)

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Bob Geldof has only one line in the entire movie that is not a lyric by Pink Floyd: "Take that, fuckers!" See more »

Goofs

When the groupie (Jenny Wright) pops open a bottle of champagne, she pours it into a glass, in the very next shot however she is drinking it from a plastic cup. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Pink: [singing] So ya, thought ya might like to, go to the show. To feel the warm thrill of confusing that space cadet glow. Tell me is something eluding you sunshine? Is this not what you expected to see? If you wanna find out what's behind these cold eyes, you'll just have to claw your way through this disguise!
See more »

Connections

Referenced in Nostalgia Critic: The Wiz (2012) See more »

Soundtracks

The Happiest Days of Our Lives
Written by Roger Waters
Performed by Pink Floyd
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

See more (Spoiler Alert!) »

User Reviews

 
fascinating!
8 January 2005 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

Roger Waters has weaved a compelling visual of the journey of a disturbed and misled mind. Though the viewer is sometimes left to sort out obscure animations and confusing images, it is not without direction. Subsequent viewings of this film reveal substance that only a genius could imbue in his writing. Character development through such subtle action in places casts a light upon Roger Waters as a person who understands the frailty of the human mind. The main character, Pink, portrays angles of the human condition we all face at some point by embodying a victimized character: sick over the loss of his father to the war; negatively spotlighted at school for talents that are apparently unfavorable at the time; unable or just unwilling to relate to his wife; and ultimately shut off from effectively relating to others because of an inability to express himself in ways that others understand.

Not only is the story captivating, but the music is such that it will always be noted as not only ahead of its time, but timeless.

The Wall is a masterpiece of storytelling, but not in the traditional sense. One must not watch this film expecting everything on a silver platter. Symbolism and metaphors abound, leaving a great deal of interpretation and adaptation to the viewer. Sit with an open mind and let Waters' character help you read into yourself.


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