Fast Times at Ridgemont High
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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2005 | 2003

1-20 of 63 items from 2015   « Prev | Next »


A history of stoners in film

27 August 2015 9:47 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Ahead of American Ultra’s release in UK cinemas, we look at the rise of the stoner in film, from the 30s to the present...

"The motion picture you are about to witness may startle you. It would not have been possible, otherwise, to sufficiently emphasize the frightful toll of the new drug menace which is destroying the youth of America in alarmingly increasing numbers. Marihuana is that drug - a violent narcotic - an unspeakable scourge - the Real Public Enemy Number One!

So reads the opening crawl to the now infamous film Reefer Madness. Originally released in 1936, it was designed as a hard-hitting expose of marijuana and its inherent dangers. The drug could cause "violent, uncontrollable laughter," the movie's introduction read. It could induce "dangerous hallucinations," "monstrous extravagances," all eventually leading to "shocking acts of physical violence... ending often in incurable insanity."

Reefer Madness was one of many »

- simonbrew

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Interview: Actor Sam Elliott, Director Paul Weitz Visit ‘Grandma’

26 August 2015 10:38 AM, PDT | HollywoodChicago.com | See recent HollywoodChicago.com news »

Chicago – Actor Sam Eliott will make you smile. The distinctive voice, his famous mustache and his character presence in a film or TV show increases any potential in the production. He recently was in Chicago with director Paul Weitz, as they teamed up in the film “Grandma,” starring the incomparable Lily Tomlin.

Grandma” has a very unique premise. Tomlin is the title character of Elle, who is visited by her granddaughter Sage (Julia Garner). The girl is seeking an abortion, and her feminist poet grandmother seems like the right fellow traveler on her way to the procedure. Sam Elliott portrays Karl, Elle’s ex-husband – she left him for a same sex partner – who harbors a resentment toward circumstances in their relationship. The two meet along the way to the clinic, and the resentment boils to the surface.

Lily Tomlin and Sam Elliott in ‘Grandma

Photo credit: Sony Pictures Classics

Sam Elliott »

- adam@hollywoodchicago.com (Adam Fendelman)

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‘Clueless’ Director Amy Heckerling on Sporadicus and the Hate-e-ans

19 August 2015 10:40 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Writer-director-producer Amy Heckerling is known for exploring the teenage psyche with films like “Clueless” and “Fast Times at Ridgemont High.” Current projects include bringing a “Clueless” musical to Broadway. She talked about “Clueless” backstories like why it’s set in the San Fernando Valley, the politics of mispronunciation and the merits of knee-high stockings.

On the first day of shooting, Alicia (Silverstone) was going to debate whether immigrants should be able to come into America — what we call the Hate-e-ans Speech. It was written and spelled correctly (Haitians), but that’s just how she pronounced it. After she did the first take, everybody wanted to rush up to her and correct her, and I had to hold them off because I liked the way that sounded, and I didn’t want her to have any knowledge that that was not absolutely correct. I wanted her to feel completely confident.

With »

- Whitney Friedlander

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“The Ultimate ’80s Guilty Pleasure Movie”: Randal Kleiser on Summer Lovers

5 August 2015 1:05 PM, PDT | Filmmaker Magazine - Blog | See recent Filmmaker Magazine news »

Has there ever been another summer for American movies like the summer of 1982? From the release of John Milius’s Conan the Barbarian on May 14 to the exploitation double-whammy of Class of 1984 and The Beastmaster on August 20, virtually every week saw the release of one or more spectacularly enjoyable films across a wide array of genres. The summer gave us a pair of Spielberg classics (E.T., Poltergeist) and numerous seminal science fiction films (Blade Runner and John Carpenter’s The Thing were released on the same day); teen comedies both high (Fast Times at Ridgemont High, The Last […] »

- Jim Hemphill

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Respect for Tom Cruise

1 August 2015 10:11 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Matthew Lee on his respect for Tom Cruise

Since 2006, Tom Cruise has been reduced to, for lack of a better phrase, a global joke; a quick source for derision, slander, and mockery among the A-List Hollywood performers for the masses to prod at. There was his Jumping the Couch moment on Oprah, the uncomfortable Scientology interview, his termination with Paramount studios, and M:i:iii underperforming at the box office. In short, 2006 was not a good year for the iconic A-Lister.

Despite such set-backs Cruise still produces and stars in critically and financially successful movies, which proves his presence in Hollywood is unscathed. One needs only to look at 2011’s Mission Impossible – Ghost Protocol, which would become Cruise’s highest grossing film to date, or the last few films that have received critical acclaim i.e. Edge of Tomorrow. Further, when one looks at Cruise’s career, one gets a sense that »

- Matthew Lee

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Exclusive: Thn interview ‘Gremlins’ star Zach Galligan

26 July 2015 11:00 AM, PDT | The Hollywood News | See recent The Hollywood News news »

Zach Galligan at London Film and Comic Con. Photo Credit: Kat Smith

In case last year’s 1984 Retrospective series didn’t confirm it, this writer is a huge fan of the Gremlins movies. The first film turned thirty (along with myself) last year and I spent pages and pages telling you all just why it is still so amazing today (it’s here if you missed it). With this all in mind it was quite obvious that when the lead actor from both movies, Zach Galligan, was announced for London’s Film and Comic Con, I seized the opportunity to interview him.

That being said, I had met Galligan at a previous London and Film Comic Con a couple of years previous. It was before my time at Thn and I hadn’t quite managed to reign in the inner fan girl and I fear I may have come across as rather excitable. »

- Kat Smith

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Amy Heckerling To Direct Pair Of ‘Red Oaks’ Episodes For Amazon

20 July 2015 9:42 AM, PDT | Deadline TV | See recent Deadline TV news »

The helmer behind Fast Times At Ridgemont High is heading back to the 1980s, but this time she’s switching coasts. Amy Heckerling is set to direct two episodes of Amazon Studios’ original comedy Red Oaks for exec producer Steven Soderbergh. Set in summer 1985 in New Jersey, the coming-of-age series centers on 20-year-old David Myers (Craig Roberts), who takes a job as an assistant tennis pro at the predominantly Jewish Red Oaks country club in New Jersey and tries to… »

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The Ten Greatest Stoners in Movie History

9 July 2015 4:15 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Interview | See recent The Hollywood Interview news »

By Alex Simon

2015 will most likely go down as the year that the once-taboo became respectable, with both gay marriage and marijuana finding legal and public acceptance nationwide. While the Supreme Court made same-sex marriage legal in all fifty states, the marijuana initiative is having an appropriately slower, but steady climb into legality. That said, we thought we’d take a look at some of cinema’s greatest proponents of the stoner lifestyle, before it all becomes downright conventional.

10. Jeff Spicoli—Fast Times at Ridgemont High (1982)

Sean Penn not only became a star with his turn as surfer/stoner Jeff Spicoli in the 1980s’ most iconic teen movie, he established how the stoners of the ‘80s differed from their predecessors: while the rebels of the ‘60s and ‘70s viewed their use of cannabis as a symbol of rebellion, and preferred it to alcohol and the other symbols of their parents’ generation and its decadence, »

- The Hollywood Interview.com

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What do the cast of Back to the Future look like now? Michael J Fox, Christopher Lloyd, more

3 July 2015 1:30 AM, PDT | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - Movie News news »

In the run-up to Back to the Future's 30th anniversary on July 3, Digital Spy presents a week of special features celebrating the time-travel classic.

Great Scott! Has it really been 30 years? Back to the Future celebrates a landmark anniversary this week, so to mark the occasion we take a look back at the film to find out what the cast were doing then and where they are now.

We get all misty-eyed and nostalgic about Michael J Fox, Christopher Lloyd, Lea Thompson and their Bttf cast-mates below!

Michael J Fox

A huge teen idol thanks to his role in sitcom Family Ties, Fox initially wasn't able to play Marty McFly due to a scheduling conflict with his TV show. The part of Marty went to Eric Stoltz, he was fired five weeks into filming, then Fox jumped on board as a last-minute replacement. The schedule was gruelling (10am-6pm on Family Ties, »

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All-American High Revisited review – amusing 80s time capsule of life before mobile phones

2 July 2015 1:10 PM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

This return to a real-life Fast Times at Ridgemont High shows what happened to some of the documentary’s original interviewees.

In 1984, director Keva Rosenfeld made a documentary about life at a high school in Torrance, southern California; a sort of real-life Fast Times at Ridgemont High, that screened on public television in the States and sank quickly into obscurity. Thirty years later, the film – now a time-capsule of embarrassing 80s fashions and mobile-phone-free lifestyles – has been freshened up with a 20-minute coda showing what happened to some of the interviewees. Somewhat predictably, rebels have become cops, preppie girls with Princess Di haircuts have become lefty educationalists, cheerleaders work in marketing, stoners regret not studying more, and almost no one is pursuing the career they’d imagined in high school. At least the cheerful Finnish exchange student, the original film’s narrator, seems settled and contented. Neither the 80s material »

- Leslie Felperin

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The Gunman Giveaway: A Brand New Blu-ray Player And 5 Sean Penn Blu-rays

1 July 2015 6:40 AM, PDT | cinemablend.com | See recent Cinema Blend news »

Great news, Cinema Blend fans! In order to celebrate the Blu-ray release of Sean Penn.s latest flick The Gunman, which comes out this week and is currently available in stores and online, Cinema Blend is partnering with Think Jam and Universal to giveaway a beautiful, brand new Blu-ray player and copies of 5 different Sean Penn classics.  Milk Carlito.s Way The Interpreter Fast Times At Ridgemont High The Gunman. You can check out the box art for The Gunman below. Fortunately, winning the price package is extremely easy too. All you need to do is go to Cinema Blend.s Facebook Post here and tell us which Sean Penn role is your all-time favorite and why. You can choose Matthew Poncelot from Dead Man Walking. You can choose Jimmy from Mystic River. You can even pick any of his cameos. Just be very specific and very creative. We.ll »

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All American High Revisited: ‘A kind of cinematic school reunion’

29 June 2015 1:00 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

It may be trying too hard to be a bit Boyhood, but Keva Rosenfeld’s doc-about-a-doc is part of a revealing strand of Us culture

In any grading of high-school movies, Fast Times At Ridgemont High would earn a distinction. That 1982 comedy comes packed with charismatic performances from such ripening-on-the-tree stars-to-be as Sean Penn, Jennifer Jason Leigh and Phoebe Cates. Leigh prepared by taking a job at the pizza parlour where her character works; Penn was so Method about playing stoned surfer Jeff Spicoli that he later wrote: “Was I being Jeff or Sean? I felt like there was no Sean. I was immersed.”

That immersion is shared by the book that inspired the film, a non-fiction work of the same name by Cameron Crowe, later to become the writer-director of his own teen gem, Say Anything. Crowe, then 22, went undercover for a year at Clairemont High School, San Diego, »

- Ryan Gilbey

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Contest: Win Sean Penn’s The Gunman On Blu-Ray

26 June 2015 11:45 AM, PDT | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

After remaining on the straight and narrow with a string of dramatic performance in recent years, including Gangster Squad and the Ben Stiller-fronted The Secret Life of Walter Mitty, the Oscar-winning actor is following in the footsteps of one Liam Nesson for Pierre Morel’s The Gunman.

Beyond sharing a director, Morel’s latest feature also harbors similarities to Taken in that Penn’s former special forces soldier will be called out on one last job. That said, by having our grizzled protagonist suffering from Ptsd, The Gunman is arguably more visceral than its genre contemporaries, and with a supporting cast that includes Javier Bardem, Idris Elba, Ray Winstone, Mark Rylance and Jasmine Trinca, you’ll search far and wide for an unashamed B-movie actioner with a bigger heart.

To celebrate The Gunman‘s arrival on Blu-Ray and DVD at the end of this month, We Got This Covered »

- Michael Briers

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20 Reasons Why 'Kids' is an American Masterpiece

25 June 2015 6:51 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Read More: Here's How 'Kids' Happened 20 Years Ago 1. It completely changed the "teen movie" genre.  Larry Clark is said to have set out to "make the Great American Teenage Movie, like the Great American Novel." Before "Kids," teen movies were relegated to the soft high school comedy ("Ferris Bueller's Day Off," "The Breakfast Club," "Sixteen Candles," "Fast Times at Ridgemont High" and "Dazed and Confused"). "Kids" put a much darker, grittier spin on the high school story, opting for the depraved underbelly of teenage counterculture rather than the meet-cute suburban sex comedy that largely comprised the genre. 2. It helped normalize non-actors.  Along with "Slacker," Richard Linklater's 1991 portrait of Austin youth, "Kids" was among the first films to showcase the merits of using so-called "street kids" and other non-actors to enhance authenticity. »

- Indiewire

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A Clueless Musical Is in the Works and All Is Right With the World

25 June 2015 6:00 AM, PDT | Us Weekly | See recent Us Weekly news »

We are majorly, totally, butt-crazy in love with this idea! Two decades after Clueless became an instant (and instantly quotable!) classic, director Amy Heckerling is moving forward with plans to turn her '90s flick into a Broadway musical. The Fast Times at Ridgemont High filmmaker told Entertainment Tonight this week that she's lined up both a director (Rock of Ages' Kristin Hanggi) and a producing team (Dodger Theatricals) to bring Cher and the gang to the Great White Way. "I've written what they call the book, and it's [...] »

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Drive-In Dust Offs: The Burning

20 June 2015 12:07 PM, PDT | DailyDead | See recent DailyDead news »

The Slasher boom that caught fire in the late 70’s in North America pulled a lot of ‘inspiration’ in their kills from the Italian Gialli that had gone before ( I’m looking at you, Friday The 13th Part 2), but oddly none adopted the feel or the look from their stylish brethren. That is, until The Burning (1981), a summer camp slaughterhouse produced by a fledgling little company called Miramax. A uniquely nasty little number, The Burning stands apart from many of its campkill cousins with elevated performances, strong direction, and a mood that evokes the best of Argento.

Bob and Harvey Weinstein started Miramax as a way to get into the movie business, coming from a background in music promotion. All signs pointed towards horror as the entry point – you didn’t need stars, and limited locations keep costs down. The Burning was budgeted at 1.5 million, and only brought in half »

- Scott Drebit

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Laff: 'Fast Times at Ridgemont High' Gets the Eli Roth Treatment

19 June 2015 3:55 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Read More: Why the Live Read is Here to Stay The 2015 edition of the Los Angeles Film Festival wrapped up its final day with another edition of its live reads, this time featuring the script for the 80's cult classic "Fast Times at Ridgemont High." The reading was led by writer-director Eli Roth, who was taking a break from literally swimming with sharks for "Shark After Dark," the Discovery show he's hosting for this year's Shark Week in July. Roth, who has built his directing reputation around taking risks and working under immense pressure, didn't hesitate to accept the challenge and managed to pull together a cast comprised of friends and frequent collaborators from across the industry. "There is a type of movie that used to happen, that I think is [now] lost, and that is the character movie," Roth told the audience in his introductory remarks. Although "Fast Times at Ridgemont High »

- Shipra Harbola Gupta

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Eli Roth, Courtney Love Highlight ‘Fast Times at Ridgemont High’ Live Read at L.A. Film Fest

19 June 2015 9:49 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

“It’s probably the first film that didn’t condescend to American teenagers.”

So began Film Independent’s curator Elvis Mitchell as he introduced a special Live Read Thursday of Cameron Crowe’s script for the 1982 comedy “Fast Times at Ridgemont High.”

“There wouldn’t be a John Hughes movie without it,” Mitchell continued.

The event concluded this year’s Los Angeles Film Festival with a one-night-only reading, chosen and directed by filmmaker Eli Roth, and performed exclusively for those present in the audience. As always, no recordings were allowed.

Roth is known for extreme horror films, so his selection of a teen comedy may have seemed surprising to some. But the 43-year old director is an avowed fan of ’80s high school movies like “Porky’s,” “The Last American Virgin” and “Zapped!” which made his choice almost inevitable.

“‘Fast Times’ is one of my all-time favorite movies,” Roth told »

- Matthew Chernov

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Nostalgia power: The best of the '80s for Father's Day

19 June 2015 8:30 AM, PDT | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - Movie News news »

We can't help but feel a warming wash of nostalgia when we think back over the golden age of '80s cinema and the classic comedy, horror and teen movies it gave us.

And the further we leave that increasingly distant decade behind, the more fondly we recall the school discos, questionable fashion choices and giant hairdos of the past.

Father's Day is on the horizon (on Sunday June 21 - don't forget!) - with a recent Netflix survey revealing that one of the things British dads most want to pass on to their children is a love for classic '80s cartoons including Danger Mouse. This got us thinking about the great nostalgic films and shows featured on Netflix.

In honour of all fathers out there, here's a look back at a time when our dads were young (or at least younger) with some '80s gems, all available to »

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Ten filmmakers whose skills would be well-suited to television

10 June 2015 8:39 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Rian Johnson

The migration of filmmakers from the big screen to the small one is not a new phenomenon, but another team was formally inducted this weekend, with the Wachowskis’ Netflix series Sense8 making its debut. The duo join the ranks of others such as Steven Soderbergh, and they are far from the last ones, as Steve McQueen, Baz Luhrmann, and Amy Seimetz are among those who are poised to make the creative leap as well. There are some filmmakers, however, who have displayed a set of talents that make the idea of them moving to television an exciting one. Here are ten filmmakers who would be a great fit on the small screen in charge of a tv show.

1) Alex Garland

With a writing filmography that includes 28 Days Later, Sunshine, Never Let Me Go, and Dredd, Alex Garland has proven that, no matter the genre, he is capable of telling a compelling story. »

- Deepayan Sengupta

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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2005 | 2003

1-20 of 63 items from 2015   « Prev | Next »


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