Fanny och Alexander
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Fanny and Alexander (1982) More at IMDbPro »Fanny och Alexander (original title)

2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2007 | 2006 | 2002

8 items from 2015

In praise of Christina Lindberg, goddess of Swedish sexploitation

25 September 2015 12:05 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

It all started with Exposed. I’m not sure what brought this 1971 Swedish sexploitation film to the suggestion portion of my Netflix account (presumably the roster of Jess Franco films recently added), but after reading the description, I figured it was worth a shot: “A pretty young teen finds her innocence lost when an unguarded night of revelry yields shameful secrets, and a stack of nude pictures that could ruin her life. But to get her hands on the negatives, she’ll have to expose herself even further.” That is indeed the basic plot of the film, which plays out exactly as one would expect for such fare. But what was unexpected while watching Exposed (also known as the much less enticing Diary of a Rape), was the 21-year-old star of the film. Her name is Christina Lindberg.

Exposed, for lack of a better phrase, is what it is. It »

- Jeremy Carr

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Olivier Assayas Gives Criterion His Top Movies

29 May 2015 1:57 PM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

One of our favorite directors, Olivier Assayas ("Summer Hours," "Clouds of Sils Maria") has a predictably eclectic Top Ten List, detailed at Criterion, which is actually a much longer list than ten. He offers American entries from Steven Soderbergh, Richard Linklater, Michael Mann, Robert Altman, Wes Anderson and Noah Baumbach! Have you seen them all? I've never seen the director's cut of Michael Cimino's "Heaven's Gate," the TV cut of Ingmar Bergman's "Fanny and Alexander," Sacha Guitry's "Désiré" or "Judex" by Georges Franju. I will have to remedy that.  1. "The Leopard" (Luchino Visconti) 2. "Pickpocket" (Robert Bresson) (tie) "Andrei Rublev (Andrei Tarkovsky) (tie) "White Material" (Claire Denis) (tie) "A Christmas Tale" (Arnaud Desplechin) (tie) "Chungking Express" (Wong Kar-wai) (tie)  "Dazed and Confused" »

- Anne Thompson

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Oscar-Nominated Film Series: Bergman's Final, Disturbing Masterwork About Religion, Power and Child Abuse

7 May 2015 6:39 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

'Fanny and Alexander' movie: Ingmar Bergman classic with Bertil Guve as Alexander Ekdahl 'Fanny and Alexander' movie review: Last Ingmar Bergman 'filmic film' Why Ingmar Bergman's Fanny and Alexander / Fanny och Alexander bears its appellation is a mystery – one of many in the director's final 'filmic film' – since the first titular character, Fanny (Pernilla Allwin) is at best a third- or fourth-level supporting character. In fact, in the three-hour theatrical version she is not even mentioned by name for nearly an hour into the film. Fanny and Alexander should have been called "Alexander and Fanny," or simply "Alexander," since it most closely follows two years – from 1907 to 1909 – in the life of young, handsome, brown-haired Alexander Ekdahl (Bertil Guve), the original "boy who sees dead people." Better yet, it should have been called "The Ekdahls," for that whole family is central to the film, especially Fanny and Alexander's beautiful blonde mother Emilie, »

- Dan Schneider

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Premieres galore at Sydney Film Festival

5 May 2015 5:40 PM, PDT | | See recent news »

Neil Armfield.s Holding the Man, Simon Stone.s The Daughter, Jeremy Sims. Last Cab to Darwin and Jen Peedom.s feature doc Sherpa will have their world premieres at the Sydney Film Festival.

The festival program unveiled today includes 33 world premieres (including 22 shorts) and 135 Australian premieres (with 18 shorts) among 251 titles from 68 countries.

Among the other premieres will be Daina Reid.s The Secret River, Ruby Entertainment's. ABC-tv miniseries starring Oliver Jackson Cohen and Sarah Snook, and three Oz docs, Marc Eberle.s The Cambodian Space Project — Not Easy Rock .n. Roll, Steve Thomas. Freedom Stories and Lisa Nicol.s Wide Open Sky.

Festival director Nashen Moodley boasted. this year.s event will be far larger than 2014's when 183 films from 47 countries were screened, including 15 world premieres. The expansion is possible in part due to the addition of two new screening venues in Newtown and Liverpool.

As previously announced, Brendan Cowell »

- Don Groves

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Beautiful Disasters: "The 5,000 Fingers of Dr. T"

30 March 2015 5:27 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

We spend years viewing the world through the eyes of a child before abandoning it. Not the world, that is—but we grow into players in the game of Life, rub our heavy eyelids, and take to ever-trippy existence from a heightened perspective in which our formative fears and fantasies are filtered through a scope less blurry, unadulterated. And then in doing so we leave a little something behind. For a grown-up to be considered “childish” comes with more negative connotations than posi, but to retain one’s inner child is a paramount strength. So what is the difference?Theodore Geisel, also known under the pseudonym Dr. Seuss, authored the most celebrated children’s literature of his time. He presented generations upon generations whimsical visions which, in proper auteur style, require just a single glance to recognize as work of his. Geisel’s simply-worded fables were praised for encouraging youth »

- Oliver Skinner

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Ingmar Bergman A Legend By Time

23 February 2015 10:52 AM, PST | Cinelinx | See recent Cinelinx news »

Ingmar Bergman leaves his mark the way a nightmare leaves a scar. His films haunt you, they're hard. You confront the difficulty, it mends, and you're stronger for it. He maintained a strict intimacy in his work environment. His cast and crew rarely succeeded more than 30 closely knit members, and even fewer remained while shooting. With this light ensemble he produced classics in surplus that explored grand ideas with minimal means. But when I say classic, I don't mean the way people consider Forrest Gump one. I mean a hard classic, the kind that filmmakers pay their inspirational dues, and critics and historian's sob over with glee.  


They're what you'd consider a "Capital-g Great Film", which means the experience can prove grueling for those lacking the trained appetite. And for those initiated, prepared to combat the attrition, there's that hard-earned reward to bask in later. What distinguished films like Persona, »

- (Aaron Hunt)

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'Birdman' cinematographer Emmanuel Lubezki joins exclusive club with Oscar win

22 February 2015 7:29 PM, PST | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

By winning the Best Cinematography Oscar for a second year in a row, "Birdman" director of photography Emmanuel Lubezki has joined a truly elite club whose ranks haven't been breached in nearly two decades. Only four other cinematographers have won the prize in two consecutive years. The last time it happened was in 1994 and 1995, when John Toll won for Edward Zwick's "Legends of the Fall" and Mel Gibson's "Braveheart" respectively. Before that you have to go all the way back to the late '40s, when Winton Hoch won in 1948 (Victor Fleming's "Joan of Arc" with Ingrid Bergman) and 1949 (John Ford's western "She Wore a Yellow Ribbon"). Both victories came in the color category, as the Academy awarded prizes separately for black-and-white and color photography from 1939 to 1956. Leon Shamroy also won back-to-back color cinematography Oscars, for Henry King's 1944 Woodrow Wilson biopic "Wilson" and John M. Stahl »

- Kristopher Tapley

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Ruben Ostlund’s ‘Force Majeure’ Beats Venice Golden Lion ‘Pigeon’

27 January 2015 6:30 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Stockholm — Last year, Roy Andersson’s “A Pigeon Sat On A Branch Reflecting on Existence” became the first Swedish film to win Venice’s Golden Lion. But on home turf, at Monday’s Swedish Film Gala, it no chance against Ruben Ostlund’s “Force Majeure” one of the most critically acclaimed pics of 2014.

Co-produced by Erik Hemmendorff, Marie Kjellson and Coproduction Office’s Philippe Bober, “Force Majeure” swept no less than six Guldbagge Awards, which is a record at the 51 year-old kudos ceremony.

Ostlund individually picked up three of them, best directing, script and editing (together with Jacob Secher Schulsinger) at the awards, which took place at Stockholm Cirkus.

Force Majeure” also took best film, cinematography (Fredrik Wenzel) and supporting actor for Norway’s Kristofer Hivju.

At one of his winning speeches, Ostlund paid homage to his competitor and one of his key sources of inspiration. “Without Roy Andersson and »

- Jon Asp

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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2007 | 2006 | 2002

8 items from 2015, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

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