Deathtrap (1982) - News Poster

(1982)

News

Exclusive: How ‘Star Wars’ Led J.J. Abrams to His Broadway Debut

Exclusive: How ‘Star Wars’ Led J.J. Abrams to His Broadway Debut
“Theater geek” may not be the most obvious label for J.J. Abrams, who has built a film and TV career directing, writing and producing sci-fi and action-heavy shows (Alias, Lost), rebooting film franchises (Star Trek, Star Wars) and launching his own Easter egg-filled film universe (Cloverfield). But the filmmaker has the same appreciation for Broadway as he does The Twilight Zone, the sci-fi anthology series he’s long considered to be one of the best on TV.

“I’ve been a fan of theater all my life,” Abrams tells Et. In fact, he has been attending shows in New York City, where he was born, since he was a young kid, collecting playbills from every production along the way. “I embarrassingly saved all of them.”

He recalls seeing the original runs of The Magic Show, starring Doug Henning, and Noises Off, as well as various productions of Arthur Miller and Tennessee Williams plays. He cites Ira Levin
See full article at Entertainment Tonight »

Raising Caine on TCM: From Smooth Gay Villain to Tough Guy in 'Best British Film Ever'

Michael Caine young. Michael Caine movies: From Irwin Allen bombs to Woody Allen classic It's hard to believe that Michael Caine has been around making movies for nearly six decades. No wonder he's had time to appear – in roles big and small and tiny – in more than 120 films, ranging from unwatchable stuff like the Sylvester Stallone soccer flick Victory and Michael Ritchie's adventure flick The Island to Brian G. Hutton's X, Y and Zee, Joseph L. Mankiewicz's Sleuth (a duel of wits and acting styles with Laurence Olivier), and Alfonso Cuarón's Children of Men. (See TCM's Michael Caine movie schedule further below.) Throughout his long, long career, Caine has played heroes and villains and everything in between. Sometimes, in his worst vehicles, he has floundered along with everybody else. At other times, he was the best element in otherwise disappointing fare, e.g., Philip Kaufman's Quills.
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Alex Garland & Rian Johnson Talk 'Ex Machina,' Misdirecting The Audience, Shooting On A Budget And More

For writer/director Alex Garland and his movie “Ex Machina,” things are going about as well as one could have ever hoped, particularly for someone who’s taken on such complex subject matter for his directorial debut. The sci-fi film has been very well-received by critics (read our own enthusiastic review), and though it doesn’t hit theaters nationwide until this Friday, it’s had considerable box office success in its limited release thus far. Even better? Garland’s film has also won the heart of filmmaker Rian Johnson, the man behind "Brick" and "Looper," and who will be writing and directing “Star Wars: Episode VIII.” Johnson joined Alex Garland, after a screening of “Ex Machina” at the Arclight Hollywood last Saturday, for a special Q&A. The director seemed genuinely blown away by the film, which he compared favorably to such films as “Sleuth” and Sidney Lumet’s “Deathtrap.
See full article at The Playlist »

Ranked: How superhero stars fared after giving up the cape

Ranked: How superhero stars fared after giving up the cape
Donning the cape and tights to play a big screen superhero was often seen as career suicide for actors. This idea is mined to brilliant effect in Alejandro González Iñárritu's Birdman, with a former comic book star looking to relaunch his career with an ambitious Broadway play.

Adding extra spice to Birdman is the casting of Michael Keaton, himself a former Batman whose post-tights career has been somewhat hit and miss. This film, however, is a stunning reminder of just how good an actor Keaton is and proof that careers don't end when on-screen superpowers fade away.

Digital Spy takes a look at 20 ex-superhero stars to see how they fared after leaving an iconic comic book role behind.

20. Billy Zane

The suave American actor looked set for big things in the '90s thanks to impressive roles in Dead Calm and Tombstone, but his time in the purple Phantom
See full article at Digital Spy - Movie News »

Remembering Superman Reeve Ten Years After His Death

Christopher Reeve: 'Superman' and his movies (photo: Christopher Reeve in 'Superman' 1978) Christopher Reeve, Superman in four movies from 1978 to 1987, died ten years ago today. In 1995, while taking part in a cross-country horse race in Culpeper, Virginia, Reeve was thrown off his horse, hitting his head on the top rail of a jump; the near-fatal accident left him paralyzed from the neck down. He ultimately succumbed to heart failure at age 52 on October 10, 2004. Long before he was cast as Superman aka Clark Kent, the Manhattan-born (as Christopher D'Olier Reeve on September 25, 1952), Cornell University and Juillard School for Drama alumnus was an ambitious young actor whose theatrical apprenticeship included, while still a teenager, some time as an observer at London's Old Vic and Paris' Comédie Française. At age 23, he landed his first Broadway role in a production of Enid Bagnold's A Matter of Gravity, starring Katharine Hepburn.
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Linktime Stories

Cinematically Insane #DontTouchTCM when it comes to Turner Broadcasting layoffs

Richard Kelly, of Donnie Darko directing fame, lurves Gone Girl and write a whole epic essay about it while also touching on Eyes Wide Shut and Fincher's music videos

In Contention interviews cinematographer Robert Elswit (Inherent Vice, Nightcrawler)

Mnpp gives Quote of the Day to Michael B Jordan on his costumes for Fantastic Four. "snug"

Deadline Scarlett Johansson about to do an Edith Wharton miniseries that was originally supposed to be a Michelle Pfeiffer feature film in the 90s. *sniffle*

Empire first images of Mark Wahlberg, Jessica Lange and Brie Larson in The Gambler remake

Vulture the exact moment Jennifer Garner fell in love with Ben Affleck

Antagony & Ecstacy on The Boxtrolls. Glad Tim loved it

Boston Globe Mark Wahlberg's compound is finished. Holy third nipple, is he planning to house everyone who has ever appeared in any of his movies?
See full article at FilmExperience »

Marian Seldes, Broadway Legend, Dies at 86

Marian Seldes, Broadway Legend, Dies at 86
Marian Seldes, the Tony Award-winning star of A Delicate Balance who was a teacher of Kevin Kline and Robin Williams, a muse to playwright Edward Albee and a Guinness Book of World Records holder for most consecutive performances, died Monday at age 86. She died peacefully at her home after an extended illness, her brother Timothy Seldes said. "It is with deep sadness that I share the news that my dear sister Marian Seldes has died," he said in a statement. "She was an extraordinary woman whose great love of the theater, teaching and acting was surpassed only by her deep love for her family.
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Looking back at Peter Sellers in Hoffman

Aliya looks back at the film Peter Sellers wanted destroyed and finds it very, very dark indeed...

Feature

Peter Sellers is one of those figures of British comedy whom everyone feels, in retrospect, was only laughing on the outside. If you want to know about his less than happy life then it's worth watching Geoffrey Rush give a brilliant performance in The Life and Death of Peter Sellers (2004). Rush does a really good job of putting across his deep-seated sense of emptiness. Sellers once said of himself, “I could never be myself… You see, there is no me. I do not exist… There used to be a me, but I had it surgically removed.” This might sound like a deep statement of angst; it seems entirely fitting to me that he said it to Kermit during his 1978 appearance on The Muppet Show. Ten seconds later you can watch him recite
See full article at Den of Geek »

Why Playing Superman Proves Dangerous in Hollywood

Why Playing Superman Proves Dangerous in Hollywood
Hugh Jackman hasn’t suffered for flashing his claws from time to time. Nor has Christian Bale or George Clooney been permanently scarred by time spent under Batman’s cowl.

Superman, however, remains possibly unique in the pantheon of cinematic heroes, and the damage — real or imagined — associated with playing that strange visitor from another planet appears, at the very least, to have cast a longer-than-usual shadow over those who have dared to fly a mile in his cape and tights.

Due to the suicide (unless proven otherwise) of George Reeves, who played the character on television; and the tragic accident that paralyzed Christopher Reeve, one of his alter egos in film, there has even been talk through the years of a “Superman curse.”

Analyzing the challenges of being Superman, however — and toting the massive baggage he carries on his back — doesn’t require any superstitious mumbo-jumbo. The factors would
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Why Playing Superman Proves Dangerous in Hollywood

Why Playing Superman Proves Dangerous in Hollywood
Hugh Jackman hasn’t suffered for flashing his claws from time to time. Nor has Christian Bale or George Clooney been permanently scarred by time spent under Batman’s cowl.

Superman, however, remains possibly unique in the pantheon of cinematic heroes, and the damage — real or imagined — associated with playing that strange visitor from another planet appears, at the very least, to have cast a longer-than-usual shadow over those who have dared to fly a mile in his cape and tights.

Due to the suicide (unless proven otherwise) of George Reeves, who played the character on television; and the tragic accident that paralyzed Christopher Reeve, one of his alter egos in film, there has even been talk through the years of a “Superman curse.”

Analyzing the challenges of being Superman, however — and toting the massive baggage he carries on his back — doesn’t require any superstitious mumbo-jumbo. The factors would
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Mark Bomback Enters Veronica's Room

Good news for fans of Ira Levin! The Weinsteins have brought their feature film version of his 1973 Broadway thriller Veronica's Room one step closer to fruition! Read on for the latest details.

From the Press Release

TWC-Dimension announced today that Mark Bomback (The Wolverine, Unstoppable, Dawn Of The Planet Of The Apes) has signed on to pen Veronica's Room, a big-screen adaptation of author Ira Levin's (Rosemary's Baby, The Stepford Wives, Deathtrap) 1973 Broadway thriller.

Bomback did production re-writes on 50 Shades Of Grey, and his script Art Of Racing In The Rain is currently in development at Universal.

The dark tale of Veronica's Room explores the thin line between fantasy and reality. Students Susan and Larry find themselves enticed to an old New England mansion by its caretakers to meet the sole surviving member of the family. They insist that Susan bears a striking resemblance to Veronica, the family member's long-dead sister.
See full article at Dread Central »

'Wolverine' Writer to Adapt Thriller 'Veronica's Room'

'Wolverine' Writer to Adapt Thriller 'Veronica's Room'
The Wolverine writer Mark Bomback has signed on to write Veronica's Room for TWC-Dimension. The film is an adaptation of writer Ira Levin's (Rosemary's Baby, The Stepford Wives, Deathtrap) 1973 Broadway thriller. Bomback, whose credits also include Unstoppable and Dawn of the Planet of the Apes, did production rewrites on Fifty Shades of Grey. His script Art of Racing in the Rain is currently in development at Universal. Veronica's Room explores the thin line between fantasy and reality. Students Susan and Larry find themselves lured to an old New England mansion by its caretakers to meet the sole surviving member of the family. They insist that Susan

read more
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

The Wolverine Writer Mark Bomback Checks Into Veronica's Room

TWC-Dimension announced today that Mark Bomback ( The Wolverine , Unstoppable , Dawn of the Planet of the Apes ) has signed on to pen Veronica's Room , a big-screen adaptation of author Ira Levin's ("Rosemary's Baby," "The Stepford Wives," "Deathtrap") 1973 Broadway thriller. Bomback did production re-writes on 50 Shades of Grey and his script Art of Racing in the Rain is currently in development at Universal. The dark tale of Veronica's Room explores the thin line between fantasy and reality. Students Susan and Larry find themselves enticed to an old New England mansion by its caretakers to meet the sole surviving member of the family. They insist that Susan bears a striking resemblance to Veronica, the family member's long-dead sister. They...
See full article at Comingsoon.net »

Veronica's Room Adaptation Coming to the Big Screen

Bob and Harvey Weinstein announced today they have signed on to executive produce, finance, and distribute a big-screen adaptation of author Ira Levin's (Rosemary's Baby, The Stepford Wives, Deathtrap) 1973 Broadway thriller Veronica's Room, produced by The Allegiance Theater's Daniel Dubiecki (Juno, Up in the Air) and Lara Alameddine, who originally brought the project to the Weinsteins' new moniker, TWC-Dimension.

The dark tale of Veronica's Room explores the thin line between fantasy and reality. Students Susan and Larry find themselves enticed to an old New England mansion by its caretakers to meet the sole surviving member of the family. They insist that Susan bears a striking resemblance to Veronica, the family member's long-dead sister. They believe her presence will comfort the dementia-afflicted woman and allow her to die in peace. But what begins as a simple errand of mercy quickly spirals into a nightmare cycle of guilt, sacrifice, and murder.
See full article at MovieWeb »

The Weinsteins to Enter Veronica's Room

Good news for fans of Ira Levin! The Weinsteins have secured the rights to bring a feature film version of his 1973 Broadway thriller Veronica's Room to the big screen for the first time. We're just surprised it's taken this long!

From the Press Release

Bob and Harvey Weinstein announced today they have signed on to executive produce, finance, and distribute a big-screen adaptation of author Ira Levin’s (Rosemary’s Baby, The Stepford Wives, Deathtrap) 1973 Broadway thriller Veronica’S Room, produced by The Allegiance Theater’s Daniel Dubiecki (Juno, Up In The Air) and Lara Alameddine, who originally brought the project to the Weinsteins’ new moniker, TWC-Dimension.

The dark tale of Veronica’S Room explores the thin line between fantasy and reality. Students Susan and Larry find themselves enticed to an old New England mansion by its caretakers to meet the sole surviving member of the family. They insist that
See full article at Dread Central »

Frozen Trailer Debuts

  • Comicmix
Disney has released the first teaser trailer for November’s animated Frozen. The film features the usual impressive vocal cast and comes well pedigreed. Frozen (In 3D) Genre: Animated Comedy/Adventure Rating: Tbd U.S. Release Date: November 27, 2013 Voice Cast: Kristen Bell, Idina Menzel, Jonathan Groff Directors: Chris Buck, Jennifer Lee Producer: Peter Del Vecho Screenplay by: Tba

Click here to view the embedded video.

Walt Disney Animation Studios, the studio behind Tangled and Wreck-It Ralph, presents Frozen, a stunning big-screen comedy adventure. Fearless optimist Anna (voice of Kristen Bell) sets off on an epic journey—teaming up with rugged mountain man Kristoff (voice of Jonathan Groff) and his loyal reindeer Sven—to find her sister Elsa (voice of Idina Menzel), whose icy powers have trapped the kingdom of Arendelle in eternal winter. Encountering Everest-like conditions, mystical trolls and a hilarious snowman named Olaf, Anna and Kristoff battle the elements
See full article at Comicmix »

Superman Reboot Grossed $3 Million More Than Originally Estimated - Now No.2 Non-Sequel in June (Sort of)

Man of Steel weekend box office: Above estimates, but real June record remains beyond the reach of Superman 2013 reboot (image: Henry Cavill as Superman in Man of Steel) Somewhat surprisingly — it’s usually the other way around — Warner Bros.Man of Steel grossed more than $3 million above studio estimates released on Sunday, June 16, 2013. Directed by Zack Snyder (300, Sucker Punch), and starring Henry Cavill (The Tudors, possibly the upcoming The Man from U.N.C.L.E.), the 2013 Superman reboot scored $116.61 million from 4,207 North American locations according to weekend box-office actuals found at Box Office Mojo. Once Thursday evening figures are added, the $225 million-budgeted Man of Steel‘s domestic cume reached $128.68 million by Sunday evening. Now, Man of Steel‘s adjusted $116.61 million doesn’t change the June Box-Office Record Chart in any way. The Superman reboot remains ahead of the former official June champ, the Tom Hanks-, Tim Allen-voiced Toy Story 3‘s
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

A Thriller For Thriller Authors By Thriller Authors

Writers writing about writers often comes across as a bit indulgent when thrown up on the silver screen, and only rarely do we get reflective gems like Charlie Kaufman’s Adaptation or Stanley Kubrick’s The Shining, though a few other worthwhile efforts have come forth and been unduly forgotten. One such film is Sidney Lumet’s screen adaptation of Ira Levin’s play Deathtrap starring Michael Caine and Christopher Reeve as writers with less than honorable intentions. It’s a thriller with more than its fair share of twists and turns and it features two thoroughly enjoyable performances by its male leads. And, by the grace of the Warner Brothers’ archives, Deathtrap can now be found on Blu-ray, though the high-definition doesn’t really do it any favors.

Read more...
See full article at JustPressPlay »

Disney Casts Jonathan Groff in Frozen

  • CinemaSpy
Concept art for Frozen.

Walt Disney Animation Studios has announced the signing of Jonathan Groff to play the role of Kristoff in its upcoming comedy adventure Frozen.

Groff, a Tony Award nominee, has appeared on Broadway in the musical Spring Awakening. His other stage credits include the Public Theater’s revival of Hair, Ira Levin’s Deathtrap in the West End, the off-Broadway plays Prayer for My Enemy and The Submission, and 2010 Tony Award-winner Red.

On TV Groff has had roles in Glee, the Starz series Boss and The Good Wife. He made his big-screen debut in Ang Lee’s Taking Woodstock and went on to appear in the independent drama Twelve-Thirty, The Conspirator as well as the upcoming Sundance entry C.O.G..

Frozen is directed by Chris Buck (Tarzan, Surf’s Up) and Jennifer Lee (screenwriter for Wreck-It Ralph), and produced by Peter Del Vecho (Winnie the Pooh,
See full article at CinemaSpy »

Criterion Collection: Rosemary’s Baby | Blu-ray review

Just in time for Halloween, Criterion has remastered what’s long been culturally considered one of the most notable pieces of horror film making in cinematic history, the eerie classic, Rosemary’s Baby. Standing as not only the first adaptation of someone else’s material for auteur Roman Polanski, this would mark his first foray into Hollywood, and his final product still stands as template of the film industry’s far-reaching allure to achieve a European arthouse aesthetic successfully melded with mainstream pulp.

Still, to approach this classic title, (that’s become so deeply ingrained in our cultural syntax that nearly everyone knows what the titular baby is really synonymous with), as purely a genre exercise modulated simply to invoke fear and unease, would be a mistake. What makes the film transcend showy thrills is how it plunders into our more collectively subconscious fears, giving us a kitchen sink melodrama
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »
loading
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

Showtimes | External Sites