6.1/10
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114 user 135 critic

Cat People (1982)

A young woman's sexual awakening brings horror when she discovers her urges transform her into a monstrous black leopard.

Director:

Writers:

(story), (screenplay)
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Popularity
3,847 ( 694)

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ON DISC
Nominated for 2 Golden Globes. Another 1 nomination. See more awards »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Irena Gallier (as Nastassia Kinski)
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...
...
...
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Detective Brandt
Ron Diamond ...
Detective Ron Diamond
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Ruthie
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Bronte Judson
Tessa Richarde ...
Billie
Patricia Perkins ...
Taxi Driver
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Sandra
Fausto Barajas ...
Otis
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Storyline

The Cat People originated way back in time, when humans sacrificed their women to leopards, who mated with them. Cat People look similar to humans, but must mate with other Cat People before they transform into panthers. Irene Gallier was raised by adoptive parents and meets her older brother Paul for the first time since childhood. We follow brother and sister - who seem to be the only ones of their kind left. Written by Colin Tinto <cst@imdb.com>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

An erotic fantasy for the animal in us all. See more »


Certificate:

R | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

2 April 1982 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

La marca de la pantera  »

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Box Office

Budget:

$18,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$1,617,636, 4 April 1982, Wide Release

Gross USA:

$7,000,000
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (TV)

Sound Mix:

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The director liked Frankie Faison's performance as "Det. Brandt" but in editing didn't feel his voice worked, so it was dubbed by that of African American actor Albert Hall. See more »

Goofs

The straw in Irena's glass disappears and reappears between shots when she is in the bar with Alice. This may not be a goof because at the end of the scene, you see Irena holding the straw between her hands, which suggests that she has been playing with it throughout the scene. See more »

Quotes

Paul Gallier: Long ago, our ancestors sacrificed their children to the leopards. The souls of the children grew inside the leopards, until the leopards became human. We were gods then.
Paul Gallier: We are a incestuous race. We can only make love with our own, otherwise we transform. And before we can become human again, we must kill.
Paul Gallier: Welcome home.
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Connections

Referenced in Tootsie (1982) See more »

Soundtracks

Putting Out the Fire (Theme from Cat People)
Music Written by Giorgio Moroder
Lyrics Written and Performed by David Bowie
Arranged by Anthony Marinelli (uncredited)
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User Reviews

 
Sex, Violence, Silliness, and an Emerging Cult Favorite
20 May 2005 | by See all my reviews

In general terms, the basic premise of both original 1942 CAT PEOPLE and the 1982 Paul Schrader remake are the same: an exotic European beauty is given to transforming into a black panther when sexually aroused. But Schrader unravels this fantasy concept in some very overtly Freudian directions, setting his version in against the decadent charm of New Orleans, introducing a theme of incest, and ramping up the original with a lot of nudity, a lot of sex, and some of the most graphic violence around. The result is an American blood-and-gore horror film with a hypnotic European sensibility that equates both sexual frustration and orgasm with violent death.

The story line concerns two orphaned siblings (Natasha Kinski and Malcom McDowell) who are reunited in New Orleans as adults--but they are, unbeknownst to the sister, the descendants of a mutant race who can only mate with their own kind without transforming into ravening beasts who must then kill to regain their human form. When sister Natasha rejects her brother's advances and then falls in love with a hunky zoo director all hell breaks loose.

In some respects the film is extremely, extremely frustrating, often sliding over the edge from a sexually provocative shocker into moments of annoying silliness--but on the whole it works extremely well as a both a sexual fantasy and a semi-camp statement in gratuitous sex and violence. Kinski is ideally cast as the sexy but virginal Irena; you can literally see the "cat" side of her nature emerge more and more as the film progresses. McDowell is equally interesting as her mad brother, and John Heard, Annette O'Toole, and particularly Ruby Dee offer excellent performances in the supporting cast. The New Orleans backdrop is extremely effective, and (speaking as one who has been there) the darker side of the city is perfectly captured; the Moroder score--which includes some sultry vocals by David Bowie--is also extremely good.

A great many people will loathe CAT PEOPLE, and the reasons will be diverse. The film is extremely bloody, often to a can-you-stand-to-look-at-the-screen degree; there is tremendous nudity and considerably sexual activity; and the combination of sex and violence into a sadomasochistic eroticism is quite disturbing. Beyond this, more critically inclined viewers may find themselves annoyed by the script's silliness and the fact that it does not always go as far over the top as it leads you to expect, and certainly the film's very literal depiction of fantasy elements will not be to every taste. But if you have a hunger to walk on the wild side, CAT PEOPLE (which is rapidly gaining status as a cult film) will suit your need as guilty pleasure.

Gary F. Taylor, aka GFT, Amazon Reviewer


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