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Blade Runner (1982)

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A blade runner must pursue and try to terminate four replicants who stole a ship in space and have returned to Earth to find their creator.

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Writers:

(screenplay), (screenplay) (as David Peoples) | 1 more credit »
Popularity
105 ( 142)
Top Rated Movies #140 | Nominated for 2 Oscars. Another 11 wins & 16 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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John Edward Allen ...
Hy Pyke ...
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Storyline

In the futuristic year of 2019, Los Angeles has become a dark and depressing metropolis, filled with urban decay. Rick Deckard, an ex-cop, is a "Blade Runner". Blade runners are people assigned to assassinate "replicants". The replicants are androids that look like real human beings. When four replicants commit a bloody mutiny on the Off World colony, Deckard is called out of retirement to track down the androids. As he tracks the replicants, eliminating them one by one, he soon comes across another replicant, Rachel, who evokes human emotion, despite the fact that she's a replicant herself. As Deckard closes in on the leader of the replicant group, his true hatred toward artificial intelligence makes him question his own identity in this future world, including what's human and what's not human. Written by blazesnakes9

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Man Has Made His Match... Now It's His Problem See more »

Genres:

Sci-Fi | Thriller

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for violence | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

Country:

| |

Release Date:

25 June 1982 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Dangerous Days  »

Box Office

Budget:

$28,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend:

$6,150,002 (USA) (25 June 1982)

Gross:

$27,000,000 (USA)
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (Workprint Version)

Sound Mix:

(70 mm prints)| (35 mm prints)

Color:

(Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Harrison Ford became a spokesman for Japanese electronics throughout the 1980s following his role in this film. See more »

Goofs

(Final Cut version). At 57m 35s Deckhard asks to buy some Tsingtao , which is a beer. The server returns with a bottle of unlabeled clear liquid and wraps it up. Should be a pale yellow color. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Female announcer over intercom: Next subject: Kowalski, Leon. Engineer, waste disposal. File section: New employee, six days.
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Crazy Credits

In the "happy ending" Theatrical/International cuts, the credits play over the gorgeous scenery. In later Director/Final cuts, they play over a normal black background. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Duke Nukem 3D (1996) See more »

Soundtracks

Harps of the Ancient Temples
Composed by Gail Laughton
Performed by Gail Laughton
Courtesy of Laurel Records
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
Timeless
14 July 2005 | by (Canada) – See all my reviews

What can be said about this film that hasn't already been covered in preceding decennia? Blade Runner (either version) stands the test of time as an epic story which transcends a disparity of genres, as well as the seminal "dark" sci-fi film which has been mimicked so frequently (to varying degrees of success) since its original release. The interplay of film noir, sci-fi, and what is one of the most philosophically symbolic and academically analyzed narratives of the modern era holds its ground on both visual and cerebral levels even in the face of today's CGI laden blockbusters. The new director's cut, contrary to many cinematic re-hashings, actually serves to clarify many of the more nebulous aspects of the plot and makes a great film even better, arguably allowing it to be modernized and polished for a new generation of viewers who are more picky and yet simultaneously less idealistic. All while sustaining the feeling and flavor of the original. Call it restorative work if you will. The tinny and meandering score by Vangelis is pure 1980s at its most brooding and fits the texture and mood of the film beautifully. Indeed, for many reasons, finding this film in someone's DVD collection makes a true statement about their discriminating and refined taste in movies, and equally their appreciation of film as an artistic medium. I would suggest picking up a reader by someone like Nietzsche, Foucualt, Descartes, Kierkegaard, or any of the great existentialist philosophers after viewing this film in order to appreciate the story & its concepts at a whole new level, regardless if you're watching it for either the 1st, or the 100th time. An enduring classic and an intrepid piece of film-making with rich & often haunting visuals designed to entertain and promote introspection amongst its viewers. 9/10.


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