Edit
Annie (1982) Poster

(1982)

Trivia

Jack Nicholson signed on to play Oliver Warbucks, but dropped out after the original producer left.
Jump to: Cameo (1) | Director Cameo (1)
Steve Martin was offered the role of Rooster. He turned it down when he heard he would be working alongside Bernadette Peters. They were breaking up at the time, and Steve felt it would be too painful to work with her for several months.
Drew Barrymore auditioned for the title role of Annie which in the end was cast with Aileen Quinn.
Aileen Quinn's red curly wig was so itchy that the producers gave her a special comb for scratching her head.
Daddy Warbucks' mansion was built in 1929 by Hubert Parson, the president of F.W. Woolworth. He called it Shadow Lawn. It is now Woodrow Wilson Hall, owned by Monmouth University in West Long Branch, NJ.
The lines "Goddamn it!" and "Come back here ya Goddamned kid!" were included specifically to get a PG rating. The studio believed only parents with small children would see a G-rated live-action movie.
Kristin Chenoweth auditioned for Annie, but was turned down because of her thick Southern accent. She later went on to play Lilly St. Regis in Annie (1999).
In the play, Grace Farrell brought the adoption papers to the orphanage. After the film script had Oliver Warbucks do it, Carol Burnett and Albert Finney lobbied the songwriters for a song to sing together to flesh out the only meeting between Warbucks and Hannigan. Their duet, "Sign," was written in two days.
Supervising editor Margaret Booth was also the original editor of Camille (1936), the movie that Annie and Daddy Warbucks see in the "Let's Go to the Movies" number.
This movie took two years to produce, had a budget over US $35 million and utilized over 1,900 production personnel.
Despite being the 10th biggest grossing film of 1982, the film didn't make a profit because of its exorbitant production costs.
In 2003, while on the NPR program "Fresh Air," Carol Burnett told interviewer Terry Gross that after she thought her filming on "Annie" was all done, she had a plastic surgery procedure on her chin that significantly changed the appearance of her lower face from what it had been during shooting. But after the surgery, the producer Ray Stark called her back in for a re-shoot of part of the "Easy Street" number. Burnett joked to Gross that her Miss Hannigan went into a closet in her office with one chin and emerged, two months later, with a different one.
Amanda Peterson auditioned for Annie, and made the top seven, but was ultimately offered a smaller role. In the reprise of "Dumb Dog", she sings "Rover, when you think it over."
Auditions for the title role spanned two years, 22 cities, 8,000 interviews, and 70 actresses. Nine young actresses made it to the second round.
Annie was created by Chicago Tribune cartoonist Harold Gray. She was originally intended to be a boy, Little Orphan Otto, but her gender was changed at the request of Gray's editor, Captain Joseph Medill Patterson, to create a reference to the 1885 James Whitcomb Riley poem "Little Orphan Annie".
Bette Midler was offered the role of Miss Hannigan, but she declined. The part in the end was cast with Carol Burnett.
The songs "Dumb Dog," "Sandy," "Let's Go To The Movies," "We Got Annie," and "Sign" were written expressly for the film. The songs from the original play that were dropped were "NYC", "We'd Like To Thank You, Herbert Hoover", "You Won't Be An Orphan For Long," "Annie," and "A New Deal For Christmas". The last four songs are not in either the film or TV adaptations.
Production designer Dale Hennesy died in the middle of production. Gene Callahan agreed to finish the film, but refused to have his name listed in the credits, giving the credit to the late Dale Hennesy.
Reportedly, Mick Jagger keenly sought the role of Rooster Hannigan. This was at least the second role sought by Mick Jagger which ultimately went to Tim Curry, the earlier one being Dr. Frank-n-Furter in The Rocky Horror Picture Show (1975). Additionally, both actors had been passed over for the lead role in A Clockwork Orange (1971).
When Miss Hannigan says, "Wrap it up, I'm listening to Helen Trent," she is referring to "The Romance of Helen Trent," a radio soap opera about a middle-aged woman seeking romance. It ran from 1933 to 1960.
A young Elizabeth Berkley auditioned for the role of Annie, but was told that she was too tall.
In the comic strip, Oliver Warbucks made his fortune through the sale of weapons and ammunition during the Great War, hence the name "war bucks". He was originally a guest character, but he was so popular that Harold Gray brought him back as a regular.
Tim Curry said he based his performance of Rooster on a stagehand he knew while performing a play in New York City.
To make Sandy the dog kiss Annie (Aileen Quinn), she rubbed an apple on her face.
The stage version of Annie ends at Christmas. The film changed it to the 4th of July because it was shot during the summer, and getting enough fake snow to cover the grounds of the New York mansion was far too expensive.
The original stage play premiered at the Alvin Theatre (now the Neil Simon Theatre) in April 1977, ran for 2,377 performances, and closed January 2, 1983. It won 7 Tony Awards, including Best Musical and Best Book of a Musical, on which the screenplay was based.
Albert Finney shaved his head to play Oliver 'Daddy' Warbucks. When she met him at the movie's premiere, Aileen Quinn didn't recognize him at first, because his hair had grown back.
Sandy was played by two dogs. "Bingo", did most of the dramatic scenes; the other did the stunt work, such as jumping into the pool.
Aileen Quinn had to dye her hair red because her original hair color is brown and you could see it through the wig.
The woman who ran Annie's orphanage in the original strip was called Miss Asthma. This name was initially used in the musical for the woman who runs Annie's orphanage, but it was changed to Miss Hannigan (leading to the popular assumption that "Miss Hannigan" was the name used in the original strip).
The rights to the sequel, "Annie Warbucks" were purchased by Sony Pictures.
The scene featuring "Maybe" was the last one to be shot. It replaced the original opening sequence, which was too long. The reprise later on, by the orphans, was left in the film.
The song "We Got Annie" was included in an early draft of the stage musical, but it was dropped as several revisions were made before the show ever reached the stage. "We Got Annie" was meant to be sung by the downtrodden customers at a local coffee shop where Annie worked cleaning tables.
The address of the Warbucks mansion is 987 Fifth Avenue, which does not exist. If it did exist, it would be at the corner of 80th Street and Fifth Avenue. Across the street, at 1000 Fifth Avenue, is the Metropolitan Museum of Art.
Shirley Temple, who died on February 10, 2014, was the last surviving film star mentioned in the song "Let's Go to the Movies".
The top three candidates for the title role were Aileen Quinn, Robin Ignico, who played Duffy, and Angela Lee Sloan, who was told she looked too much like Quinn to play a lead orphan, but was offered a smaller role. In the "Hard-Knock Life" son sequence, Lee is a sleeping orphan.
The only characters in the film that were in the "Little Orphan Annie" strip were Annie, Daddy Warbucks, Sandy, Punjab, and the Asp. The last two were not in the play. When Martin Charnin began work on the musical, the characters were cut because he didn't want any fantasy or magic. They were reinstated in order to incorporate more elements from the strip.
One deleted scene, in which Annie confronts Miss Hannigan in her room, appeared in promotional lobby cards for the film, and on the box of the video release.
Pop singer Martika is one of the dancing orphans in the film.
The melody for "Tomorrow" was based on a melody that Charles Strouse wrote for a song called "The Way We Live Now Is Different", for the short film Replay (1970).
A more elaborate sequence for the song "Easy Street" was planned and shot, involving Miss Hannigan and Rooster's fantasies of a privileged life, but it was replaced with the less elaborate version set entirely in the orphanage. Lights, Camera, Annie! (1982) revealed that the first verse of the song was recorded and presumably filmed, but cut from the final version to keep the running time down. The documentary also reveals a new verse to the final reprise of "Maybe" that is in no other version, but was ultimately cut.
The film premiered at Radio City Music Hall, 1260 Avenue of the Americas, Madison Square Garden and situated in the Rockefeller Center in New York City. It's nick-name is "The Showplace of the Nation".
Aileen Quinn, who turned 10 during the filming, came from Yardley, Pennsylvania.
The story for the musical 'Annie' is an original one. Nothing from the original comic strip could have been used in the musical. The story written for the musical caused some confusion about Annie's origin in the original comic strip. The storybooks that came out at the time of the movie's premiere are all sequels to the plot of the film.
Even though Charles Strouse and Martin Charnin were hired to write new songs, they and Thomas Meehan were not allowed on set or to talk to any of the cast members until they threatened to tell the New York Times.
The movie takes place around 1933 (Annie was born in 1922 according to her birth certificate) however the movie "Camille" that they attend in the "Let's Go to the Movies" number wasn't released until 1936.
5 of 5 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Additional/alternate scenes from many of the film's musical numbers (including "Easy Street," "Let's Go to the Movies," "I Don't Need Anything But You" and the final reprise of "Maybe") were featured in the making-of TV special Lights, Camera, Annie! (1982).
Aileen Quinn received an 'introducing' credit.
Then child star Aileen Quinn has stated that her favorite song from this movie is "Maybe".
Contrary to the lovable "FDR" in the film, Harold Gray's comic strip was strongly opposed to Franklin D. Roosevelt.
Ray Stark said of the film, "This is the film I want on my tombstone." In his negative review of the film, Time Magazine's Richard Corliss wrote "Funeral services are being held at a theater near you." Stark died four days after Sony Pictures Home Entertainment released a pan-and-scan DVD of the film in Region 1, although they had released a widescreen version in 2000.
In a 2013 interview, Martin Charnin admitted he didn't like this film or Annie (1999) because of changes to the original show.
9 of 11 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The original opening had Sandy the dog running around the city while the stage song "We'd Like to Thank You, Herbert Hoover" played over the radio.
9 of 11 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Screen rights for the stage show were sold in 1978 for $9.5 million (approximately $34.4 million in 2014 dollars), breaking the record set when Warner Bros. paid $5.5 million for the screen rights to My Fair Lady (1964). Paramount Pictures made Popeye (1980) to make up for being outbid.
Edward Herrmann also played Franklin D. Roosevelt in Eleanor and Franklin (1976) & Eleanor and Franklin: The White House Years (1977), and The Roosevelts: An Intimate History (2014). The last was in voice only, shortly before his death.
6 of 7 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
David Begelman, who brought the stage show to Columbia Pictures' attention, was originally intended to produce the film. After Begelman forged Cliff Robertson's signature on a check, the creators of the stage show refused to sell the rights to the studio if Begelman was producer. Ray Stark took the job, even though he didn't like the original Broadway show.
7 of 9 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
As Daddy Warbucks, Albert Finney is doing a voice-impression of his director, John Huston.
3 of 3 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
John Huston's only musical as a director. He was asked to direct Doctor Dolittle (1967) but turned it down. At one point, he was considered for the role of Daddy Warbucks. He was turned down because he was too old.
6 of 8 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
John Huston was considered an outsider. According to Carol Sobieski, producer Ray Stark loved that kind of high-risk situation.
6 of 8 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
This is the only movie for which John Huston was nominated for a Razzie for worst director.
6 of 8 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Carol Burnett and animal supervisor Ralph Helfer were childhood friends.
5 of 7 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Before Ray Stark became producer, stage librettist Thomas Meehan wrote an early draft of the screenplay, and stage choreographer Peter Gennaro was to have recreated his Broadway choreography. It was Stark's idea to hire Carol Sobieski to restructure the film's plot.
6 of 9 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Steve Martin was offered the role of Rooster, but he was breaking up with Bernadette Peters at the time who was playing Lilly St. Regis, Rooster's girlfriend, and he did not think he could handle being so intimate on a set with her for 3 months.
2 of 2 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Actor Peter Marshall received a 'special appearance' credit.
3 of 4 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The film's closing credits declare that the film was "Originally Presented on the New York Stage by Mike Nichols".
3 of 4 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The various names of the orphan's home seen throughout the film included the "Hudson St. Orphanage", the "Hudson Street Orphanage" and the "Hudson St. Home For Girls" established in 1891.
4 of 6 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The make and model of the luxury vintage car of Oliver 'Daddy' Warbucks (Albert Finney) was a black 1930 Du Pont Model G Town Merrimac bodied Royal Town Car limousine.
4 of 6 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Sean Connery was John Huston 's first choice for Daddy Warbucks. According to the UK's Daily Express , he was even taking singing lessons for the part.
4 of 6 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Linzi Hateley was considered for the title role of Annie which in the end was cast with Aileen Quinn.
7 of 14 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Theoni V. Aldredge was also the costume designer of the original stage production.
5 of 9 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Randal Kleiser was considered as a director for the film after the commercial success of Grease (1978).
5 of 9 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Debut film and television credit of actress Aileen Quinn.
3 of 5 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Annie (1982) is the second of five "Annie" film and television versions of the "Little Orphan Annie" musical fable with the other ones being The 'Annie' Christmas Show (1977), Annie: A Royal Adventure! (1995), Annie (1999), and Annie (2014).
3 of 5 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Carol Burnett admits the movie was over produced.
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
None of the Annie's on Broadway, television or film actually had red hair.
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Martin Charnin, the creator of the original Broadway Annie, hated the 1981 film. He thought Annie was too cute, Hannigan should not have been played as a drunk and Warbucks should not have been played by an Englishman. He also didn't like the 1999 Disney version or the 2012 Broadway production either.
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Sarah Jessica Parker who was Broadway's third Annie is the most successful actress associated with any production of the show. At one point she was one of Hollywood's highest paid actresses.
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Two of the actors in the movie have featured in the James Bond film franchise. Geoffrey Holder, who played the Indian manservant-bodyguard Punjab, had played Baron Samedi in Live and Let Die (1973). Annie (1982) was released in the year before Octopussy (1983) which was extensively set and shot in India. Albert Finney, who plays bald-headed Oliver "Daddy" Warbucks, later appeared as Kincaid in Skyfall (2012). One of the most famous Bond villain characters is the bald-headed characterization of Ernst Stavro Blofeld, who has appeared in the Bond movies You Only Live Twice (1967), On Her Majesty's Secret Service (1969) and unofficially as well at the start of For Your Eyes Only (1981).
3 of 6 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The name of the yellow autogyro-like flying-machine was an "Autocoptor". The registration number of this airplane-helicopter amalgamation was "X1W".
2 of 5 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Andrea McArdle said the following about girls who played Annie after her on Broadway and in the road companies: "They were the wannabees and I was the real deal".
1 of 2 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The nick-names of Oliver Warbucks (Albert Finney) were "Daddy" and "Daddy Warbucks".
2 of 9 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The customized license plate of Daddy Warbucks (Albert Finney)'s luxury black limousine was "NYC-1" which meant New York City No. #1 or New York City's No. #1.
2 of 9 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Randall Kleiser was supposed to direct this but had to back out because of post production issues with "Blue Lagoon". Though John Huston was a legend at this point, much loved by everyone, he had never directed a musical before. He proved to be a bad choice, as " Annie" was a critical and box office failure.
Is this interesting? Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Randall Kleiser had originally been chosen as the director but backed out because of prior commitments, which is when they settled with John Huston.
Is this interesting? Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Miss Hannigan was a derivation of Miss Asthma
Is this interesting? Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The only version of Annie where she starts the show with curly hair. With every other version her hair is straight at the beginning and then she gets a perm for the closing/Christmas scene.
Is this interesting? Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Producer Ray Stark shortened the Tomorrow number, and conflated it with the Tomorrow Reprise, because he felt the number was "corny". This infuriated Martin Charnin the creator of the original Broadway show, and it's part of why he hates the movie.
Is this interesting? Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
There was a sequel to the Broadway show called Annie 2 Miss Hannigans Revenge which is considered one of the biggest bombs on Broadway ever. It was eventually reworked into the off Broadway production Annie Warbucks which is still performed regionally although there's never been a Broadway version.
Is this interesting? Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The Broadway show won the Best Musical Tony award and the best Actress (Dorothy Louden). The movie won no Oscars, but Aileen Quinn won a Razzie.
Is this interesting? Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Andrea McArdle was in high school when she played Annie on Broadway.
0 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The only musical version to include Punjab and the Asp.
0 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Was dubbed "Oliver in drag" by the critics
0 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
If your wondering just who made the songs so enjoyable the kids where mostly voice overs done by Rosanne Sorrentino soundtrack Annie (performer: "It's The Hard-Knock Life" - uncredited, "Sandy" - uncredited, "Maybe Reprise" - uncredited, "You're Never Fully Dressed Without A Smile Dressed Children" - uncredited, "Finale Medley: I Don't Need Anything But You/We Got Annie/Tomorrow" - uncredited) Albert Finney felt so strongly about Rosanne Sorrentino's talent that he included her in his press tour for the movie and even was allowed to sing solo songs on that tour. Many thanks' to you Rosanne Sorrentino
0 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink

Cameo 

Ray Bolger: uncredited as the sound effects man during the radio show broadcast.

Director Cameo 

John Huston: The voice on Miss Hannigan's radio saying, "I love you, I love you, I love you" just before "Little Girls".

See also

Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

Contribute to This Page