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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2005 | 2003 | 2002

1-20 of 22 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


Outsiders Cancelled After 2 Seasons

14 April 2017 11:22 AM, PDT | TVLine.com | See recent TVLine.com news »

The Outsiders are on the hunt for a new home; Wgn America has cancelled the drama after two seasons, according to The Hollywood Reporter.

RelatedCable/Streaming Renewal Scorecard: What’s Coming Back? What’s Cancelled? What’s On the Bubble?

Set in Kentucky’s Appalachian Mountains, Outsiders starred David Morse (St. Elsewhere), Joe Anderson (Hannibal) and Gillian Alexy (Damages) as members of the Farrell clan, a group of mountain dwellers who frequently clashed with citizens in the town of Blackburg.

The show’s April 25 episode, previously billed as a season finale, will now serve as the series finale, should Sony Pictures Television »

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Sol Negrin Dies: Emmy-Nominated Cinematographer Was 88

28 March 2017 1:06 PM, PDT | Deadline TV | See recent Deadline TV news »

Sol Negrin, five-time Emmy-nominated cinematographer, best known for his work on Kojak (1974-77) and St. Elsewhere (1982), died on March 20, Icg confirmed today. He was 88. Born in New York City, after planning to become a naval architect, he decided to pursue his love for photography in the movie industry, starting as a camera assistant from 1948 to 1960. Negrin then became a camera operator on the TV series The Naked City, The Defenders, Car 54, Where Are You? and The P… »

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Sol Negrin, Emmy-Nominated Cinematographer on 'Kojak,' Dies at 88

28 March 2017 12:11 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter - TV News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - TV News news »

Sol Negrin, a cinematographer who received five Emmy nominations, three for his work on the classic Telly Savalas cop series Kojak, died March 20, the American Society of Cinematographers announced. He was 88.

Negrin's other credits as a director of photography include episodes of McCloud, The White Shadow, St. Elsewhere and Rhoda; the 1972 documentary The Concert for Bangladesh; and the 1974 feature Amazing Grace, starring Moms Mabley.

He contributed additional cinematography to films including King Kong (1976), Superman (1978), Jaws 2 (1978), RoboCop (1987) and Coming to America (1988).

Negrin also earned four Clio Awards for his »

- Mike Barnes

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Sol Negrin, Emmy-Nominated Cinematographer on 'Kojak,' Dies at 88

28 March 2017 12:11 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

Sol Negrin, a cinematographer who received five Emmy nominations, three for his work on the classic Telly Savalas cop series Kojak, died March 20, the American Society of Cinematographers announced. He was 88.

Negrin's other credits as a director of photography include episodes of McCloud, The White Shadow, St. Elsewhere and Rhoda; the 1972 documentary The Concert for Bangladesh; and the 1974 feature Amazing Grace, starring Moms Mabley.

He contributed additional cinematography to films including King Kong (1976), Superman (1978), Jaws 2 (1978), RoboCop (1987) and Coming to America (1988).

Negrin also earned four Clio Awards for his »

- Mike Barnes

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‘Knight Rider,’ ‘Boy Meets World’ Actor William Daniels on His Early Career

17 March 2017 10:30 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

You might not know the name William Daniels, but you probably know his face — and if not his face, certainly his voice. The actor made a name for himself in the 1960 Off Broadway premiere of Edward Albee’s “The Zoo Story.” He hit the big screen in “The Graduate” and “Two for the Road” and spent the 1980s in iconic TV shows, “St. Elsewhere” and “Knight Rider” (in which he memorably voiced the car). A seven-season run in “Boy Meets World” kept him on TV throughout the 1990s. Now 89, he has written a memoir, “There I Go Again: How I Came to Be Mr. Feeny, John Adams, Dr. Craig, Kitt, & Many Others.”

Daniels began performing as a child, appearing with his sister as a song-and-dance act in the 1930s. His first mention in Variety was for “Seagulls Over Sorrento,” a play that ran in Westport, Conn., before flopping on Broadway. »

- Gordon Cox

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‘Knight Rider,’ ‘Boy Meets World’ Actor William Daniels on His Early Career

17 March 2017 10:30 AM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

You might not know the name William Daniels, but you probably know his face — and if not his face, certainly his voice. The actor made a name for himself in the 1960 Off Broadway premiere of Edward Albee’s “The Zoo Story.” He hit the big screen in “The Graduate” and “Two for the Road” and spent the 1980s in iconic TV shows, “St. Elsewhere” and “Knight Rider” (in which he memorably voiced the car). A seven-season run in “Boy Meets World” kept him on TV throughout the 1990s. Now 89, he has written a memoir, “There I Go Again: How I Came to Be Mr. Feeny, John Adams, Dr. Craig, Kitt, & Many Others.”

Daniels began performing as a child, appearing with his sister as a song-and-dance act in the 1930s. His first mention in Variety was for “Seagulls Over Sorrento,” a play that ran in Westport, Conn., before flopping on Broadway. The »

- Gordon Cox

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A Medium With a Message: Inside TV’s Long History of Tackling Social Issues

14 March 2017 10:30 AM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Abortion. Alcoholism. Pedophilia. Slumlords. Assisted suicide. Civil rights. Criminal justice reform.

These are all timely topics for television drama in 2017. But they were also tackled, with gritty realism, more than a half century ago on two landmark CBS series: “The Defenders” (1961-65), starring E.G. Marshall and Robert Reed as crusading father-and-son defense attorneys, and “East Side/West Side” (1963-64), featuring George C. Scott as a New York City social worker, with Cicely Tyson as his able secretary. Tyson’s series regular role, coupled with the fact that she appeared with her natural hair, was groundbreaking in a fraught period of civil rights struggles.

The New Frontier era ushered in by President John F. Kennedy’s election marked a moment when the networks made room for “prestige” narrative series that dealt with weighty social issues. The appetite for serious fare was stoked by the May 1961 declaration by Kennedy’s FCC chairman, Newton »

- Cynthia Littleton

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'Boy Meets World's William Daniels Gets Candid About Being a Victim of Child Abuse in New Memoir

7 March 2017 9:53 PM, PST | Entertainment Tonight | See recent Entertainment Tonight news »

Actor William Daniels is opening up about being the victim of child abuse.

The two-time Emmy winner -- best known for playing kindhearted teacher Mr. Feeny on the '90s sitcom Boy Meets World and brilliant surgeon Dr. Mark Craig on the '80s medical drama St. Elsewhere -- writes in his new memoir that he didn't realize he'd suffered from child abuse until he was an adult.

According to the 89-year-old actor, he was forced into becoming a child actor by his mother, who pushed him into auditioning for roles at a very young age, and was made to sing, dance and act alongside his sisters, Jacqueline and Carol, for hours on end without having any say in the matter.

Watch: Ali Larter Reveals Why She Won't Let Her Kids Be Child Stars

In his new memoir, There I Go Again: How I Came to Be Mr. Feeny, John Adams, Dr. Craig, Kitt & Many »

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Boy Meets World’s William Daniels Opens Up About Suffering Abuse as a Child Actor: ‘I Had No Idea’

7 March 2017 1:00 PM, PST | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

It wasn’t until William Daniels was an adult that he realized he was abused as a child actor.

The Emmy-winning actor,who starred in Boy Meets World, Knight Rider and St. Elsewhere, shares in his new memoir the painful memories of being forced into performing as a child by his mother.

Daniels, 89, was born in Brooklyn, New York in 1927 — two years before the Great Depression hit in 1929 — to his bricklayer father, Charles, and his telephone operator mother, Irene.

Daniels recalls in There I Go Again: How I Came to Be Mr. Feeny, John Adams, Dr. Craig, Kitt & Many Others »

- Natalie Stone

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The Best ‘Concept Episodes’ on TV, Ever — IndieWire Critics Survey

7 March 2017 11:58 AM, PST | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

Every week, IndieWire asks a select handful of TV critics two questions and publishes the results on Tuesday. (The answer to the second, “What is the best show currently on TV?” can be found at the end of this post.)

This week’s question: What is the best concept episode that’s been on television?

Sonia Saraiya (@soniasaraiya), Variety

I have to admit a recency bias, I guess, but “BoJack Horseman’s” “Fish Out of Water” has stuck with me in a way that no other concept episode has — a gimmick that didn’t feel gimmicky but instead desperately necessary for the forward motion of the episode. It’s not quite fair, because “Community,” for example, is comprised almost entirely of concept episodes, and it’s hard to disagree with how much “Buffy’s” “Hush” and “Once More, with Feeling” inspired other, later shows. But “Fish Out of Water” was »

- Hanh Nguyen

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The Best ‘Concept Episodes’ on TV, Ever — IndieWire Critics Survey

7 March 2017 11:58 AM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Every week, IndieWire asks a select handful of TV critics two questions and publishes the results on Tuesday. (The answer to the second, “What is the best show currently on TV?” can be found at the end of this post.)

This week’s question: What is the best concept episode that’s been on television?

Sonia Saraiya (@soniasaraiya), Variety

I have to admit a recency bias, I guess, but “BoJack Horseman’s” “Fish Out of Water” has stuck with me in a way that no other concept episode has — a gimmick that didn’t feel gimmicky but instead desperately necessary for the forward motion of the episode. It’s not quite fair, because “Community,” for example, is comprised almost entirely of concept episodes, and it’s hard to disagree with how much “Buffy’s” “Hush” and “Once More, with Feeling” inspired other, later shows. But “Fish Out of Water” was »

- Hanh Nguyen

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Mr. Feeny in 'Boy Meets World' 'Memba Him?!

3 March 2017 12:10 AM, PST | TMZ | See recent TMZ news »

William Daniels is best known for playing the wise teacher Mr. Feeny in "Boy Meets World" but also had big roles in "The Graduate," "St. Elsewhere" and even voiced K.I.T.T. in "Knight Rider." Guess what he looks like now at 89! Read more »

- TMZ Staff

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How ‘Arrow’ Producers Tackled the Gun Violence Debate

15 February 2017 11:33 AM, PST | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

This week’s episode of “Arrow” will feel a bit different.

The show’s latest installment titled “Spectre of the Gun,” which airs Wednesday, tackles the highly-controversial topic of gun control. The conversation in the episode begins after a masked man shoots up the Star City mayor’s office with many of the show’s main character’s inside. Following a press screening of the episode that Variety attended, executive producer Marc Guggenheim said they had wanted to do an episode like this for awhile.

“We went into Season 5 wanting to do an episode about an issue,” he said. “I grew up on ‘St. Elsewhere’ and ‘Picket Fences’ and ‘L.A. Law,’ and I grew up in a time where it was commonplace for a one-hour drama to tackle some of the issues of the day. Somewhere along the line the industry got away from that.”

Guggenheim cited shows like “Black-ish” and “The Carmichael Show” that continue to »

- Jacob Bryant

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As Arrow Targets Gun Control Issue, Oliver Tries to Play Hero — as Mayor

14 February 2017 4:30 PM, PST | TVLine.com | See recent TVLine.com news »

Arrow is taking aim at one of the country’s most divisive subjects.

During this Wednesday’s episode (The CW, 8/7c), a shooter opens fire in the mayor’s office, forcing Oliver Queen – not the Green Arrow – to take a stance on gun control.

RelatedArrow Boss Explains Thea’s Absence, Obstacle Facing Laurel’s Next Return

“We went into Season 5 wanting to do an episode about an issue,” executive producer Marc Guggenheim, who wrote the installment, previews. “I grew up on St. Elsewhere and Picket Fences and L.A. Law. I grew up in a time where it was commonplace – like, »

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Santa Barbara Fest Honors Emma Stone, Ryan Gosling and Raft of Artisans

1 February 2017 10:00 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

This year’s Santa Barbara Intl. Film Festival will screen a wide array of films, scores of them world or U.S. premieres, and pay tribute to film luminaries, including Denzel Washington, Ryan Gosling, Emma Stone, Isabelle Huppert, and Casey Affleck.

Casey Affleck and Michelle Williams

Cinema Vanguard Award

The “Manchester by the Sea” co-stars, both Oscar- nominated for their roles in Kenneth Lonergan’s drama about a taciturn Boston handyman with a tortured past, will receive the Cinema Vanguard honor on Feb. 5. Affleck has one earlier nomination under his belt, for “The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford,” while Williams previously scored three Academy Award nominations — for “Brokeback Mountain,” “Blue Valentine,” and “My Week With Marilyn.”

Jeff Bridges

American Riviera Award

The Oscar-nominated “Hell or High Water” star is being honored for his contribution to film by the festival. A child of Hollywood — his father, Lloyd, »

- Diane Garrett

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17 Tremendous TV Tushes

27 January 2017 7:00 AM, PST | TVfanatic | See recent TVfanatic news »

There was a time when a bare bottom caused a television uproar, as if naked butts were the worst thing television could ever show!

Barriers were broken in the tush department starting with M.A.S.H or St. Elsewhere, and it's only gotten better since then.

Now, naked butts are pretty much the rage, even on network TV. 

So what tushes have made our list? Check it out!

1. Milo Ventimiglia - This is Us It doesn't matter that it was only a short glimpse, seeing the glorious behind of Milo Ventimiglia even one second is a birthday gift for us all. 2. Gary Burghoff - M.A.S.H. It is believed that Burghoff's character, Radar was the first to bare his butt on network TV. In the episode titled, "The Sniper" which aired in 1973. Radar is in the shower when the 4077th comes under fire from a sniper and Radar runs out »

- Lisa Babick

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From TV Star to Executive: Mary Tyler Moore’s Most Iconic Moments

26 January 2017 6:18 AM, PST | Entertainment Tonight | See recent Entertainment Tonight news »

Mary Tyler Moore never set out to be one of the pioneers of television, but with her warmth and comedic chops, she cemented a legacy for generations of fans thanks to her groundbreaking work in the medium, both onscreen and behind the camera. Moore died on Wednesday from a cardiopulmonary arrest after contracting pneumonia, her publicist confirmed to Et. She was 80.  

Moore first rose to prominence on The Dick Van Dyke Show, playing the slightly daffy wife to Van Dyke’s TV writer character from 1961-66. She then branched out on her own with The Mary Tyler Moore Show, on which she became a feminist icon as a single, working woman. During the show’s run, from 1970 to 1977, she was nominated for the Emmy Award for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series every year and won a total of three awards. 

After her eponymous show ended, Moore deftly moved into films and Broadway shows, working with the »

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How Mary Tyler Moore Paved the Way for Complicated Women on TV

25 January 2017 1:15 PM, PST | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

If the only credit on the resume of Mary Tyler Moore, who died today, had been “The Mary Tyler Moore Show,” that would still be enough to put her in the company of entertainment industry legends.

The word “iconic” gets thrown around a lot, but that long-running show truly merited the word. It was a recognizable and reliably pleasurable workplace comedy, but “The Mary Tyler Moore Show” was also a lot of other things. It was a showcase for a cast of character actors who created one of the greatest ensembles in TV history; each character was memorable in his or her own right, and the performers found the complicated human beings underneath the tics, flaws, and insecurities of these messy, amusing people.

Of course, “The Mary Tyler Moore Show” was also a referendum of sorts on what a woman could be, on TV and in real life. Mary Richards was a career woman who remained single »

- Maureen Ryan

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Mary Tyler Moore’s Past Struggles and Triumphs: From Finding Sobriety to Her Battle with Diabetes

25 January 2017 12:25 PM, PST | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

While her most iconic onscreen persona seemed to handle challenges effortlessly, life wasn’t quite as kind to beloved actress Mary Tyler Moore, who died at age 80 on Wednesday.

Despite achieving sobriety after a battle with alcoholism, and finding peace decades after her only son’s accidental death, Moore’s later years were filled with health woes – struggles she faced publicly and candidly.

Married at only 18 to Richard Meeker in 1955, Moore welcomed her first and only child, Richie, a year later. By 1961, she was starring as the titular character’s wife on The Dick Van Dyke show, but her marriage was over. »

- Lindsay Kimble

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Mary Tyler Moore: The Shocking Story Behind the Smile – Her Alcoholic Mother, Her Painful Divorce and Her Son’s Death

25 January 2017 12:01 PM, PST | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Following the death of Mary Tyler Moore on Wednesday at age 80, here is the full text from People magazine’s October 30, 1995 cover story on the release of her memoir, After All.

“During the first year of The Dick Van Dyke Show, as thrilled and bursting with excitement over my work as I was, I was equally without emotion at home,” writes Mary Tyler Moore of the end of her six-year marriage to Dick Meeker in 1961.

Her indifference toward the couple’s breakup was not shared by her 5-year-old son, Richie, who soon began having troubles in school and spending more »

- peoplecomproducer

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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2005 | 2003 | 2002

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