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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000 | 1970

1-20 of 52 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


Robin Williams Chair in Comedy at USC Creates a Home for Students

19 July 2017 10:00 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Even though Robin Williams was cited by Montreal’s Just for Laughs Comedy Festival co-founder Andy Nulman as “the one who got away,” who, despite decades of pursuing him for a fest slot, never made it to the Montreal comedy gathering, the impact of the legendary comic’s work will undoubtedly be felt in all corners of the comedy world for years to come.

Director and producer Barnet Kellman was in Chicago shooting the 1992 romantic comedy “Straight Talk,” starring Dolly Parton, James Woods and Griffin Dunne, when Robin Williams stopped by to say greet to the cast and crew.

“Everybody turned and listened,” recalls Kellman, “as Robin uncorked his comedy for 15 straight minutes. He was a magical presence.”

So Kellman “never ever imagined” that decades later he would be named the inaugural holder of the Robin Williams Endowed Chair in Comedy at USC’s School of Cinematic Arts, where Kellman, professor »

- Malina Saval

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Emmys 2017 Snubs and Surprises: ‘Transparent,’ ‘The Leftovers,’ and Pamela Adlon(!)

13 July 2017 9:27 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

A “snub” implies a conscious dismissal; a knowing exclusion; a willful act of disdainful rebuffing. And in the era of “too much TV,” the idea of Emmy voters purposefully boxing out anyone other than Donald Trump is a bit nutty. Those who don’t make the cut aren’t “snubs” so much as they’re… leftovers.

But the 2017 nomination list sure was filled with surprises, good and bad. And while we’d like to refer to the surprising exclusions as leftovers, that’s just too darn confusing when so many of the excluded came from a show called “The Leftovers.” So we’re sticking with snubs. Just know that we know the TV Academy didn’t mean anything by it.

The Snubs

“The Americans”

After breaking into the major categories for the first time last year, FX’s critically acclaimed drama was kicked right back out of the Drama Series race. »

- Ben Travers

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Woody Harrelson talks War for the Planet of the Apes and his passion for the environment

11 July 2017 8:18 AM, PDT | Cineplex | See recent Cineplex news »

Woody Harrelson talks War for the Planet of the Apes and his passion for the environmentWoody Harrelson talks War for the Planet of the Apes and his passion for the environmentDebra Wallace - Cineplex Magazine7/11/2017 10:18:00 Am

When Woody Harrelson was first offered a major part in War for the Planet of the Apes, he had visions of stepping into the skin of a primate.

Then he realized he was being asked to play the Colonel, an iron-fisted, ruthless soldier brought in to tamp down the now hyper-intelligent apes waging war with mankind.

The 55-year-old actor admits he was a bit chagrined. “I tried anything and everything to get them to come around, but they told me I was playing a human,” he explains, tongue in cheek, during a recent chat at a posh Manhattan hotel. Dressed in a blue T-shirt and hoodie, he’s approachable and irreverent. “I »

- Debra Wallace - Cineplex Magazine

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Class of 1987: Frightning Strikes Twice – Celebrating House II: The Second Story with the Cast & Crew [Part 2]

9 July 2017 4:40 PM, PDT | DailyDead | See recent DailyDead news »

[Editor's Note: A version of this retrospective originally appeared in the September 2014 issue of Deadly Magazine.] With House II: The Second Story, the vastly underrated sequel written and directed by Ethan Wiley (who also wrote the screenplay for the original House), New World Pictures introduced audiences to a whole new world filled with unexpected frights and adventures with an Old West twist. The sequel was released in late August of 1987 and took a decidedly left turn away from the more straightforward house of horrors style seen in Steve Miner’s original film, instead favoring a tone that was much more light-hearted, fun-spirited, and far more family friendly.

For the uninitiated, House II follows a young man named Jesse (Arye Gross), who inherits a strange house from the parents who gave him up for adoption when he was just an infant. As he begins to settle into his new dwelling with the help of his girlfriend, Kate (Lar Park Lincoln), his best pal, Charlie (Jonathan Stark), and Charlie’s aspiring musician girlfriend, »

- Heather Wixson

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Curb Your Enthusiasm season 9 teaser arrives, air date announced

15 June 2017 7:18 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Kirsten Howard Jul 10, 2017

Larry David will be back with a ninth season of Curb Your Enthusiasm in October. Here's the first teaser...

A year on from the announcement that season 9 of Curb Your Enthusiasm was on the way, we now have an official air date for you. It'll start on October 1st and there'll be 10 episodes of maximum cringe to enjoy. Hooray!

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Along with the air date reveal, HBO also dropped a teaser trailer for the new season, which you can watch below.

Have a look....

In season 9, Larry will welcome back Jeff Garlin, Susie Essman and Jb Smoove, along with Mary Steenburgen and her real life husband Ted Danson. Newcomer Lauren Graham (Gilmore Girls) will be guest starring, too.

Curb Your Enthusiasm season 9 air date

As we now know, it's October 1st.

We'll bring you more on the »

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TV Rewind: The 9 Shows That Defined 1990, From ‘Twin Peaks’ to ‘Wings’

14 June 2017 1:04 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

The year 1990 was the beginning of a new decade that just had survived the neon excesses of the ’80s. This fresh start was seen in the world at large with the reunification of Germany, the unification of Yemen, the release of Nelson Mandela and the resignation of Margaret Thatcher as the U.K.’s prime minister.

It was also the fledgling days of the internet, when the first web server was created, providing a foundation for the World Wide Web as we know it.

Read More: ‘Animaniacs’ Reboot Being Developed by Steven Spielberg, Amblin TV and Warner Bros. — Exclusive

Over on television, “Saturday Night Live” welcomed the new talents of Chris Farley, Tim Meadows, Chris Rock, Adam Sandler, Rob Schneider and Julia Sweeney.

The year also marked the end of an era for shows like “Alf,” “227,” “Newhart,” primetime soap “Falcon Crest,” Nickelodeon’s slime purveyor “You Can’t Do That on Television, »

- Hanh Nguyen

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TV Rewind: The 9 Shows That Defined 1990, From ‘Twin Peaks’ to ‘Wings’

14 June 2017 1:04 PM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

The year 1990 was the beginning of a new decade that just had survived the neon excesses of the ’80s. This fresh start was seen in the world at large with the reunification of Germany, the unification of Yemen, the release of Nelson Mandela and the resignation of Margaret Thatcher as the U.K.’s prime minister.

It was also the fledgling days of the internet, when the first web server was created, providing a foundation for the World Wide Web as we know it.

Read More: ‘Animaniacs’ Reboot Being Developed by Steven Spielberg, Amblin TV and Warner Bros. — Exclusive

Over on television, “Saturday Night Live” welcomed the new talents of Chris Farley, Tim Meadows, Chris Rock, Adam Sandler, Rob Schneider and Julia Sweeney.

The year also marked the end of an era for shows like “Alf,” “227,” “Newhart,” primetime soap “Falcon Crest,” Nickelodeon’s slime purveyor “You Can’t Do That on Television, »

- Hanh Nguyen

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Wilson Review

9 June 2017 8:05 AM, PDT | HeyUGuys.co.uk | See recent HeyUGuys news »

Author: Scott Davis

Woody Harrelson is perhaps one of Hollywood’s most underrated actors of the past few decades – with countless fantastic performances across his career, you’d think the actor would have become one of the biggest in the world such is his immeasurable talents. But the former Cheers star has always been on the periphery which still beggars belief if you look through his catalogue of roles – whether it’s in True Detective, Rampart, White Men Can’t Jump or Natural Born Killers, Harrelson truly is one of the greats. And his new film, the acerbic comedy Wilson, only proves it further.

Harrelson stars as the titular anti-hero, a middle-aged loner who has become increasingly disillusioned with the modern society that has arisen around him – people not talking to people, more interested in their computer screens, social media and anything else that stops them having to have real conversations. »

- Scott Davis

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Bebe Neuwirth to Receive The Players’ Helen Hayes Award

8 June 2017 11:31 AM, PDT | Women and Hollywood | See recent Women and Hollywood news »

Bebe Neuwirth in “Madam Secretary

Bebe Neuwirth is already a triple threat — an actress, singer, and dancer — and soon she’ll be a Helen Hayes Award recipient. According to BroadwayWorld, the stage and screen vet will be honored with the prize from The Players, a private showbiz social club, in a ceremony on June 19. The award “honors women who have made an indelible contribution to the American theatre,” and was named after the first female member of The Players.

Bebe Neuwirth is a Broadway legend who has continually returned to her musical-theater roots while gaining millions of adoring fans through her illustrious career in film and television,” emphasized Michael Barra, president of The Players. “We are thrilled to celebrate her career with an award commemorating the great Helen Hayes, who, like Bebe, we are proud to claim as one of our most eminent members.”

Neuwirth’s first appeared on Broadway as Sheila in 1980’s “A Chorus Line.” Since then she has appeared in productions such as “Sweet Charity,” “Chicago,” “Damn Yankees,” and “Fosse.” “Cheers,” “Frasier,” “The Good Wife,” and “Blue Bloods” are among her screen credits. Neuwirth won two Emmys for her performance as Lilith on “Cheers,” and took home Tony awards for her work in “Sweet Charity” and “Chicago” as well. She has been a series regular on Barbara Hall’s CBS drama “Madam Secretary” since 2014.

The multi-hyphenate serves as vice-chair of The Actors Fund charity, “where she founded a program called The Dancers’ Resource, aimed at relieving the particular emotional and physical challenges faced by dancers,” BroadwayWorld writes.

Season 4 of “Madam Secretary” will air Sundays this fall on CBS.

Bebe Neuwirth to Receive The Players’ Helen Hayes Award was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story. »

- Rachel Montpelier

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Celebrating Frasier: TV's best comedy spinoff

4 June 2017 9:48 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Juliette Harrisson Jun 20, 2017

There's never been another comedy quite like Frasier. Join us in celebration of TV's best ever comedy spinoff...

It’s been thirteen years since Frasier Crane bid goodnight to Seattle, and the comedy landscape, the TV landscape and, indeed, the world, have transformed completely since then. To re-watch Frasier now is to return to a world of checking the answerphone after going out, hunting down irreplaceable cassette tapes, and making a connection with people you’re attracted to by giving them your landline number. But none of this makes the show any less warm, compelling or, most importantly, absolutely hilarious – it is as much a joy to watch now as it was then.

See related  Broken episode 3 review Broken episode 2 review Broken episode 1 review

Frasier existed before the days of binge-watching and box sets, but it works remarkably well in that format. The show is full of running gags, in-jokes and call-backs, from Niles’ unfortunate patients with ironic conditions in season one, Roz and Niles’ mutual dislike that eventually becomes a friendship based on mutual snark, and of course the increasingly elaborate physical descriptions of Niles’ wife Maris, to the point she could never be revealed because no human actress could play her. The show was well known for being unafraid to make a joke that only a fraction of the audience would get, and that goes for treats for long-time fans as well as obscure jokes about La Traviata or the Aeneid.

The show also provided occasional treats for fans of its parent show, Cheers. Frasier is well known as one of the greatest ever TV spin-offs (we were going to say, ‘TV’s greatest ever spin-off’, but our deep love for and loyalty to the Star Trek franchise prevented us). The way the series dealt with its history was with a mix of respect, but without being tied to it. The series was unafraid to do what was best for the current show, for example by making Frasier’s father Martin a (living) former police officer very different from his son, despite the fact that, on Cheers, Frasier had claimed he was a (deceased) psychiatrist. However, the show was also willing to deal with that, explaining in season two that Frasier had just had a fight with Martin and made it up out of spite.

Not all the Cheers call-backs the show did entirely worked, with season nine’s Cheerful Goodbyes being particularly strained, but most did. The most impressive Cheers call-back was surely Rita Wilson’s deft performance as Hester Crane in Don Juan In Hell (Part 2). The character of Hester had appeared once on Cheers, where she was a formidable presence who threatened to kill Diane. For Frasier, she was killed off to create the forced, tense situation in which Frasier and Martin would be forced to live together despite not getting on very well, and she was subsequently spoken of with great warmth by all three Cranes, who clearly considered her the glue that had held their family together. Wilson was initially cast as an entirely different character who happened to look like Hester in Momma Mia, as well as briefly playing Mrs Crane in an old family video as the warm character the other three remembered. In Don Juan In Hell, when Frasier talks to imagined visions of the four most significant women in his life, Wilson plays Hester in a way much more similar to original actress Nancy Marchand’s performance on Cheers, but still with an undercurrent of warmth, in a pitch perfect performance.

Still, the real key to the success of Frasier was not obscure jokes or call-backs. Sure, Frasier and Niles’ witticisms are mildly amusing, but whether the viewer understands what they’re saying or not, what we’re all really doing is laughing at them, not with them. It’s not mean laughter – as an audience, we love these characters, that’s why we want to spend so much time with them. But there are many comical aspects to Frasier and Niles’ personalities, and these are only amplified when they are put together and contrasted with the much more down-to-earth Martin and Roz, and so it’s often the case that it’s not the joke itself we’re laughing at, so much as Frasier and/or Niles’ delight in making the joke.

Of course, Frasier was also famous for its use of humour that doesn’t require any prior knowledge to ‘get’ it – farce. Whether it was Frasier and Niles attempting to cover up a dead seal, an escalating series of lies that starts out in trying to get rid of Daphne’s ex-fiancée and ends up with Daphne and Roz both claiming to be Mrs Crane and Martin insisting he’s an astronaut, or the epic disaster that was Frasier and Niles opening up a new restaurant together, the series excelled at elaborately set up situations spiralling out of control. The undisputed classic in this regard was surely season six’s The Ski Lodge, a perfectly constructed disaster that memorably ends with Frasier lamenting that with all the lust flying around the titular lodge, no one was lusting after him.

All the cast were also highly skilled at physical comedy, but the stand-out in that respect was clearly David Hyde Pierce, whose ability to use his whole body to emote was consistently used to great effect. Another season six episode, Three Valentines, showcased this skill in a particularly memorable almost silent scene in which we watch Niles, accompanied only by Eddie the dog, try to get his trousers perfectly ironed for a date – a task which somehow ends in blood, fainting and setting Frasier’s apartment on fire.

David Hyde Pierce also somehow managed to spin what could have been a rather seedy storyline into a first hilarious, then deeply touching romance. Niles Crane develops a crush on his brother’s employee while still married, and proceeds to leer at her from afar for six years, never properly asking her out even after leaving his wife for entirely unrelated reasons. The whole thing ought to be incredibly creepy. Perhaps it’s partly because attitudes have changed over the years and audiences are more sensitive to such things, and back in the 1990s we were less worried by the implications of such a plot-line, but that’s not the whole story. The fact is, Hyde Pierce makes Niles so tentative and uncertain, while also wringing such comedy out of his endless yearning, that he remains entirely sympathetic.

It also helps, of course, that Niles admits at the end of season one that it’s not just that he’s physically attracted to Daphne, he’s in love with her – making his obsession seem more romantic and a little less seedy. What started out as a running gag, a funny way to introduce Niles to Daphne in episode three that provided a series of quick jokes that initially only Frasier was privy to, quickly became something much more human and touching. Daphne also indicates at least affection and possibly love and attraction to Niles even before she finally discovers the truth in season seven – nearly all their semi-romantic encounters before season seven happen at her instigation (she offers to cook Niles dinner for dates twice, in A Mid-Winter Night’s Dream and First Date, it’s her idea to accompany him to a ball when his date cancels in Moon Dance, and she goes out with a virtual Niles clone in Mixed Doubles). Instead of a man’s creepy obsession with his father’s therapist, this running thread becomes an epic seven-year romance culminating in one of the great season finale cliff-hangers, Something Borrowed, Someone Blue.

Part of the reason Niles and Daphne’s story became so central to the series was the mysterious lack of any serious, long-running love interests for the show’s lead character. Frasier’s most significant female partners, as featured in the aforementioned Don Juan In Hell, were all characters created during his Cheers days – his first wife Nanette, fiancée Diane, second wife Lilith and his mother. Lilith was a constant presence throughout the series, as the two raised their son and their relationship progressed from horror at the sight of each other in season one to a sincere declaration of (largely platonic) love in season eight and even a final ‘date’ of sorts in season eleven’s Guns N’ Neuroses. Frasier also slept with his agent Bebe and best friend Roz, but when the writers flirted with the idea of putting Frasier and Roz together in a more serious way late in the series, audience reaction was negative and the returning writing team for season eleven quickly nixed the idea. Frasier’s endless list of disastrous dates eventually became a running joke, and part of the bittersweet joy of the series finale is its open-ended approach to this on-going space in Frasier’s life that he is so desperately trying to fill throughout the series.

Frasier was also a show about something not covered all that often on TV; the relationships between adult parents and children, and between adult siblings. At the start of the series, the relationships between Martin Crane and his sons are rather strained, but over eleven years we see them grow much closer. With the only child in the family (Frasier’s son Frederick) thousands of miles away, we get to watch them negotiate the changing nature of the familial relationship as all three advance into middle age and beyond, tied together by their memories of the boys’ childhoods but also sharing their experiences of dating, career changes, marriages and their social lives in a way that isn’t possible until all parties are adults. It’s a relationship change that happens to many people who stay close to parents and siblings into adulthood, but is rarely explored on television (though, considering the importance of an adult sibling relationship to Friends, there was clearly something in the air in the 1990s!).

All of this is really a long-winded way of saying that there has never been another show quite like Frasier, and probably never will be again. One final example; it’s hard to imagine any other show pulling off a storyline like the one in which Niles gets a dog. The joke is that the dog is exactly like his estranged wife Maris. That’s difficult enough to pull off in the first place, since you have to find a dog that embodies the significant traits of a human character. However, in this case, it’s especially challenging because the audience have never seen Maris. This character exists only in description through dialogue and in the imagination of the audience. And yet, when David Hyde Pierce walks in with a slim, elegant dog and describes its fussy habits and delicate constitution, we all get the joke immediately. It’s not spelled out or explained until the dog was eventually written out the following year – everyone in the audience simply understands. It’s a remarkable achievement, and one that perfectly sums up just what was so special about Frasier, one of the wittiest sitcoms we’re ever likely to see. »

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Sundance London: Wilson review: Dir. Craig Johnson (2017)

2 June 2017 3:57 AM, PDT | The Hollywood News | See recent The Hollywood News news »

Wilson review: Woody Harrelson appears as a neurotic loner in modern-day Minnesota in this adaptation of the Daniel Cloves graphic novel.

Wilson review at the 2017 Sundance London Film Festival.

Wilson review

Craig Johnson directs this low budget indie that saw a release Stateside earlier this year via Fox Searchlight. The studio introduces the film, which stars Woody Harrelson as the lonely though outgoing title character, to UK audiences via Sundance’s London thread.

We’re introduced to Wilson in his dated apartment which sits above a Chinese restaurant in present day Minnesota. Wilson lives alone with just his pet dog and still secretly pines for his estranged wife Pippi (Laura Dern), from who he separated from 17 years earlier. It takes the loss of his father to cancer for the neurotic, anxious individual to bring it upon himself to find out what happened to Pippi after she ‘moved to Los Angeles, »

- Paul Heath

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The Bottom Shelf: Troll 2, Phantasm, The Entity

1 June 2017 7:52 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Nick Aldwinckle Jun 5, 2017

We round up the latest horror-tinged Blu-ray and DVD releases....

So, after a brief hiatus, it turns out a lot’s happened in the few months between these round ups. A snap general election has been called, terror has struck at the heart of Manchester and a scandal approaching Watergate levels has hit the U.S presidency. More importantly, Troll 2 has finally come to UK Netflix and is the cherry on the cake made entirely of a series of kind of wonderful, kind of… not films on DVD and Bluray.

So, 1990’s Troll 2, you may or may not be aware of, is generally regarded as one of the very greatest 'so bad it’s good' movies. There are many worse (The Rollerblade Seven or Gary Oldman little person rom-com Tiptoes come to mind), though it’s difficult to think of many other truly awful movies »

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Ranking the Characters from Cheers from Most to Least Funny

29 May 2017 8:00 PM, PDT | TVovermind.com | See recent TVovermind.com news »

Cheers” ran for 11 years on NBC and was a popular sitcom and critically acclaimed. The iconic 1980’s series was created by Glen and Les Charles and James Burrows who would go on to create the successful spin off “Frasier”. The show set in a Boston, Massachusetts bar was filled with equal parts humor and sarcasm. Many of the shows regulars were known for their funny one liners. Here are the funniest characters on “Cheers” ranked in order of funniest to least funniest. Norm Peterson (George Wendt) With his self deprecating humor, regular bar patron Norm could be counted on

Ranking the Characters from Cheers from Most to Least Funny »

- Nat Berman

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Cheers: The Scene That Was Cut from the Last Episode

24 May 2017 9:43 PM, PDT | TVSeriesFinale.com | See recent TVSeriesFinale news »

Are you a fan of Cheers? Recently, casting director Jeff Greenberg spoke with Entertainment Weekly about the NBC series finale.Created by James Burrows, Glen Charles, and Les Charles, the long-running sitcom starred Ted Danson, Shelley Long, Nicholas Colasanto, Rhea Perlman, George Wendt, John Ratzenberger, and Kelsey Grammer. The show ran for 11 seasons before ending in 1993.Read More… »

- TVSeriesFinale.com

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That Guy Actor of the Day: Paul Willson

16 May 2017 8:00 PM, PDT | TVovermind.com | See recent TVovermind.com news »

Just about everyone recognizes Paul Willson for his role in the movie Office Space.   He was one of the two “Bob’s” coming in to figure out who was getting laid off at the fictional company Initech.  But I can almost guarantee you that you wouldn’t know Willson by name.  What you might also not know is that this guy was on Cheers for nearly the entire show’s run.   He had few speaking parts but Willson played one of the regulars at the bar.  His character name was Paul Krapence and he appeared in 55 episodes over the span of 10

That Guy Actor of the Day: Paul Willson »

- Nat Berman

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Star Wars Fans Petition for Original Chewbacca Actor to Be in Han Solo

12 May 2017 10:06 AM, PDT | MovieWeb | See recent MovieWeb news »

When production started on Han Solo: A Star Wars Story in February, the first cast photo was released, featuring Alden Ehrenreich, Donald Glover, Woody Harrelson, Emilia Clarke, Phoebe Waller-Bridge and the new Chewbacca, Joonas Suotamo. It was revealed shortly after Star Wars: The Force Awakens debuted in theaters that Peter Mayhew split his time as Chewie with Suotamo, a 6-foot-11 former basketball player, who would step in for the more physical scenes that Peter Mayhew could not perform due to his bad knees. A new petition has surfaced to bring back Peter Mayhew in Han Solo: A Star Wars Story, and while there is plenty of fan support behind this petition, it's not quite what you think.

This petition was started by Erin Victor earlier this month on Change.org, which as of now, has 3,367 signatures, out of the 5,000 needed for this petition to be delivered to directors Chris Miller and Phil Lord. »

- MovieWeb

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How ‘Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2’ Avoided an R Rating, and Other Tales from Fmx

9 May 2017 2:59 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

(“Guardians 2” spoilers follow.)

So here’s a poser: In “Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2,” we have Peter Quill (Chris Pratt) and his father, Ego (Kurt Russell), a living planet that takes on human form. Weta Digital was challenged with creating the interior look of Ego, along with the various transformations during his climactic fight with Quill.

This involved complicated mathematical patterns known as fractals (inspired by artist Hal Tenny, who served as a consultant). However, not only did Weta have difficulty controlling the fractals, but it also had to make them pliable in short order.

And then there was the biggest challenge: Weta was charged with ensuring that “Guardians” avoided an R-rating. That’s because 40% of Ego gets destroyed in the fight, and his internal organs can be seen dangling behind him. Weta offered to make him look more fractal, oozing black blood, but director James Gunn would have none of that. »

- Bill Desowitz

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‘Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2’: Those ‘Cheers’ Jokes May Mean the Marvel Universe Finally Understands On-Screen Romance

9 May 2017 8:22 AM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

[Editor’s note: Spoilers follow for “Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2” (as well as “Cheers.”)]

Of all of the Marvel Cinematic Universe properties, “Guardians of the Galaxy” has proven itself to the master of the unexpected pop culture reference. But when Peter Quill (Chris Pratt) brings up the classic 1982 – 1993 sitcom “Cheers” to describe his relationship with Gamora (Zoe Saldana), it serves as a reminder that so few people genuinely understand one of pop culture’s most popular tropes: The “Will They/Won’t They” romance.

Read More: ‘Guardians Of The Galaxy Vol. 2’ Pulls Off the Impossible: Solving Marvel’s Villain Problem

Not that the McU has a proven track record for a sophisticated understanding of adult relationships — especially among the Avengers, romance is clearly a tricky notion. Captain America has managed a few stolen kisses in between battles, but no sustained relationship beyond his timeless affection for Peggy. Bruce Banner has a connection with Black Widow, but suffers from Hulkus interruptus (and Widow has »

- Liz Shannon Miller

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‘Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2’: Those ‘Cheers’ Jokes May Mean the Marvel Universe Finally Understands On-Screen Romance

9 May 2017 8:22 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

[Editor’s note: Spoilers follow for “Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2” (as well as “Cheers.”)]

Of all of the Marvel Cinematic Universe properties, “Guardians of the Galaxy” has proven itself to the master of the unexpected pop culture reference. But when Peter Quill (Chris Pratt) brings up the classic 1982 – 1993 sitcom “Cheers” to describe his relationship with Gamora (Zoe Saldana), it serves as a reminder that so few people genuinely understand one of pop culture’s most popular tropes: The “Will They/Won’t They” romance.

Read More: ‘Guardians Of The Galaxy Vol. 2’ Pulls Off the Impossible: Solving Marvel’s Villain Problem

Not that the McU has a proven track record for a sophisticated understanding of adult relationships — especially among the Avengers, romance is clearly a tricky notion. Captain America has managed a few stolen kisses in between battles, but no sustained relationship beyond his timeless affection for Peggy. Bruce Banner has a connection with Black Widow, but suffers from Hulkus interruptus (and Widow has »

- Liz Shannon Miller

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Indulge in a Little Retail Therapy with This Weekend’s Best Home Decor and Furniture Sales

5 May 2017 1:35 PM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Cheers to the weekend — and weekend shopping!

Some of our favorite home decor stores are having major sales this weekend. Whether you’re on the hunt for that perfect piece of outdoor furniture or looking for a last-minute gift for mom (we have a few ideas here, too), this list is sure to lead you in the right direction:

Related: Mother’s Day Gift Guide: Savannah Guthrie Shares Stylish Present Ideas That’ll Brighten Any Mom’s Day

Bloomingdale’s: 20-75% off bedding, bath, electrics, cookware, dining, luggage, furniture and more (May 5-6).

Container Store: 15% off all closet essentials, everything kitchen and pantry. »

- Megan Stein

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