Southern Comfort
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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2004

10 items from 2017


Good-bye, Adam West / Uninhibited Revenge: Walter Hill’S The Assignment

10 June 2017 1:00 PM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

It’s kind of hard for me to undersell the impact Batman and Adam West had on me as a boy. I was six years old when the show premiered, and it was the first program I can remember seeing previews for and *begging* my mom to commit to letting me watch it when it finally came on. Like most every boy my age in the mid ’60s, I had a makeshift costume, a lunchbox, a plastic Batmobile, the Batman TV soundtrack (I still own the original LP), and of course the comic books, which never seemed quite as captivating to me compared to the vivid pop-art energy of the series. And hardly least of all, Batman introduced Julie Newmar’s Catwoman to me, who in turn introduced a whole other set of feelings to this six-year-old– fear and sex all rolled up into one inexplicable but ooh-la-la! package. (I’ll spare you, »

- Dennis Cozzalio

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The Joys of ‘Southern Comfort’ Including an Increasingly Pissed-Off Powers Boothe

22 May 2017 7:57 AM, PDT | FilmSchoolRejects.com | See recent FilmSchoolRejects news »

Welcome to Missed Connections, a weekly column where I get to highlight films that are little known and/or unfairly maligned. I’ll be shining a light in two directions — I hope to introduce you to movies you’ve never seen and possibly never heard of, and I’ll attempt to defend films that history, critical consensus, and maybe even […]

The article The Joys of ‘Southern Comfort’ Including an Increasingly Pissed-Off Powers Boothe appeared first on Film School Rejects. »

- Rob Hunter

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Read Director Walter Hill’s Heartfelt Tribute to Powers Boothe

17 May 2017 4:22 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Walter Hill directed Powers Boothe in just two films — “Extreme Prejudice” (1987) with Nick Nolte and “Southern Comfort” (1981) with Keith Carradine. However, the two were longtime friends, and Boothe’s death May 14 at the age of 68 hit Hill hard. He wrote this remembrance of the veteran actor for IndieWire. 

The news of his passing, especially so soon after that of Bill Paxton, came very hard. My friendship with Powers covered many years, yet we somehow managed to do only two films. I wish it had been 20.

We worked in deserts, swamps, and on sound stages; in all circumstances, I came to admire his good humor, his courtly manners, his bemused reserve… I used to gently tease him as the ‘Hamlet of the Prairies’, and even though it was difficult to imagine anyone more American (a Texan; proud of it), there was something grand about the performances, as well as the man, »

- Anne Thompson

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Read Director Walter Hill’s Heartfelt Tribute to Powers Boothe

17 May 2017 4:22 PM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

Walter Hill directed Powers Boothe in just two films — “Extreme Prejudice” (1987) with Nick Nolte and “Southern Comfort” (1981) with Keith Carradine. However, the two were longtime friends, and Boothe’s death May 14 at the age of 68 hit Hill hard. He wrote this remembrance of the veteran actor for IndieWire. 

The news of his passing, especially so soon after that of Bill Paxton, came very hard. My friendship with Powers covered many years, yet we somehow managed to do only two films. I wish it had been 20.

We worked in deserts, swamps, and on sound stages; in all circumstances, I came to admire his good humor, his courtly manners, his bemused reserve… I used to gently tease him as the ‘Hamlet of the Prairies’, and even though it was difficult to imagine anyone more American (a Texan; proud of it), there was something grand about the performances, as well as the man, »

- Anne Thompson

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Powers Boothe, Star of Tombstone, Deadwood Dies at 68

15 May 2017 9:52 AM, PDT | MovieWeb | See recent MovieWeb news »

The Hollywood community is in mourning once again after another beloved performer was lost this weekend. Powers Boothe, an Emmy-winning character actor with several diverse roles to his credit, passed away at the age of 68 on Sunday. The actor's death was first announced online in a tweet from actor Beau Bridges, and was later confirmed by his rep, Karen Samfilippo. The rep confirmed that he died in his sleep from apparent natural causes.

The Entertainment Weekly report doesn't reveal if there will be an autopsy performed or not. The actor was born June 1, 1948 in Snyder, Texas, USA, the son of a sharecropper who spent his youth chopping cotton and became the first member of his family to attend a university, receiving a fellowship to Southern Methodist University to study acting, where he received a degree in Fine Arts. After performing in Oregon, Connecticut and Philadelphia, the actor arrived in New »

- MovieWeb

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Powers Boothe: 1948-2017

14 May 2017 10:25 PM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Den Of Geek May 15, 2017

Deadwood, Tombstone, Southern Comfort, 24: Powers Boothe had left us, leaving behind an enviable body of work...

Some very sad news. The actor Powers Boothe has died, at the age of just 68. His death was announced over Twitter by his friend, Beau Bridges.

With an acting career that stretched across five decades, Boothe leaves behind a sizeable, impressive body of films, TV and theatre behind him. Some of the many highlights include his work in the two Sin City movies, his role as Cy Tolliver in the TV show Deadwood, and parts across productions as varied as Tombstone, Agents Of Shield, 24, Bill Paxton’s excellent Frailty, and the TV show Nashville. Everyone, we suspect, has a favourite Powers Boothe role.

Boothe is survived by his wife and two children. Our thoughts are with them. Rest in peace, Mr Boothe. And thank you.

»

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Powers Boothe, ‘Deadwood,’ ‘Sin City’ Actor, Dies at 68

14 May 2017 8:04 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Powers Boothe, a prolific character actor on the small and big screen, died Sunday in Los Angeles. He was 68.

According to his rep, Boothe died in his sleep Sunday morning of natural causes.

The veteran actor was best known for playing snarling villains like Curly Bill Brocious in the 1993 Western “Tombstone” and saloon owner Cy Tolliver in HBO’s “Deadwood.”

He also appeared in several comic book shows and movies, portraying Senator Roark in “Sin City” and it’s sequel “Sin City: A Dame to Kill For” (pictured above). He also had a small role in “The Avengers” and “Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.

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Celebrities Who Died in 2017

His talents weren’t only limited to genre material. Boothe played former mayor Lamar Wyatt on 26 episodes of the country drama “Nashville,” as well as Judge “Wall” Hatflied on “Hatfields & McCoys.” Prior to that, he played Vice President Daniels on “24.”

Actor »

- Lawrence Yee

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Powers Boothe, ‘Deadwood,’ ‘Sin City’ Actor, Dies at 68

14 May 2017 8:04 PM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Powers Boothe, a prolific character actor on the small and big screen, died Sunday in Los Angeles. He was 68.

According to his rep, Boothe died in his sleep Sunday morning of natural causes.

The veteran actor was best known for playing snarling villains like Curly Bill Brocious in the 1993 Western “Tombstone” and saloon owner Cy Tolliver in HBO’s “Deadwood.”

He also appeared in several comic book shows and movies, portraying Senator Roark in “Sin City” and it’s sequel “Sin City: A Dame to Kill For” (pictured above). He also had a small role in “The Avengers” and “Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.

His talents weren’t only limited to genre material. Boothe played former mayor Lamar Wyatt on 26 episodes of the country drama “Nashville,” as well as Judge “Wall” Hatflied on “Hatfields & McCoys.” Prior to that, he played Vice President Daniels on “24.”

Actor Beau Bridges tweeted news of Boothe’s passing on Sunday.

It's »

- Lawrence Yee

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What Might Have Been: A History of Failed Alien Sequels

3 May 2017 8:01 AM, PDT | Cinelinx | See recent Cinelinx news »

The Alien franchise has an interesting history not just because of the films that hit the big screen, but also because of the ones that did not. This is a look at some of the Alien films that came close to getting a greenlight, but were never made.

During the movie production process, it is not uncommon for a film to undergo several major changes in concept before becoming fully realized. The Alien franchise is one franchise that has seen its fair share of changes along the way. However, it is also unique due to the shear volume of potential films that have hit the drawing board but never progressed. Part of the reason for this is due to the fact that the Alien franchise has run into many different problems along the way. For one, it is a rare franchise with a multitude of different filmmakers and producers involved »

- feeds@cinelinx.com (G.S. Perno)

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Walter Hill on How the Action Genre Has Changed and Going Independent for ‘The Assignment’

10 April 2017 10:00 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Premiering back in September at the Toronto Film Festival, Walter Hill‘s The Assignment (formerly known as (Re)Assignment) came not necessarily as a galvanizing work from an old action master, but a charming, off-beat genre exercise as well as show-off for older thespians (chiefly Sigourney Weaver and Tony Shaloub). With the film now in theaters and on VOD, we were able to talk to Hill about the freedom and fun he had in making his first real low-budget film.

The Film Stage: How have action films changed since you returned to directing with Bullet to the Head?

Walter Hill: I think the changes were well in the works before I did Bullet to the Head. Obviously the superhero comic-book film has taken over. They’re now what’s referred to as action films, but I think they’re very different from the kind of movies we used to »

- Ethan Vestby

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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2004

10 items from 2017


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