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Will New Oscar Voters Be Bold Enough to Embrace Popular Films?

Will New Oscar Voters Be Bold Enough to Embrace Popular Films?
Everyone is curious about how Oscar voting will be affected by the Academy’s new members, with 1,700 individuals (or 23%) invited in the past three years.

For me, there’s only one important issue: Do they like popular movies?

Careful, this is a trick question, because “popular” is hard to define, especially when it comes to Oscar.

This year, worldwide box office was led by “Beauty and the Beast,” which earned $1.2 billion. The global top 20 also includes awards possibilities like “Logan,” “Dunkirk” and “Wonder Woman.” There are other 2017 films that make you feel better at the end than you did at the start, including “The Big Sick,” “The Disaster Artist,” “Downsizing,” “Call Me by Your Name” and “Get Out.”

But what are their Oscar chances? In the past 15 years, Oscar voters have leaned toward dark material.

For most of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences’ 90 years, popular films got regular Oscar attention. Among the many
See full article at Variety - Film News »

John Rhys-Davies interview: Aux, Orcs, Lord Of The Rings, Indiana Jones and more

Duncan Bowles Nov 14, 2017

John Rhys-Davies tells us about Aux, autograph hunting, horror, the Lord Of The Rings TV series and more.

In the world of geekdom, Mr John Rhys-Davies is a legend. He may well have over two hundred and fifty acting credits to his name, but it’s his part in two of the biggest (and greatest) franchises of all time that will always leap to the forefront. As Sallah in both Raiders Of The Lost Ark and The Last Crusade and Gimli in the Lord Of The Rings trilogy, he portrayed characters whose external demeanors may have differed, but whose unswerving sense of loyalty and open heartedness made them something to treasure.

We were fortunate enough to have a chat with him over the phone about British horror film Aux, in which he plays an elderly WWII veteran, who has a unique insight into a recent spate of
See full article at Den of Geek »

From ‘Star Wars’ to ‘Game of Thrones,’ Film and TV Music in a Live Setting Is Thriving

From ‘Star Wars’ to ‘Game of Thrones,’ Film and TV Music in a Live Setting Is Thriving
Just a few years ago, “film music in concert” translated to short suites by big-name movie composers (Henry Mancini, John Williams) performed at summer pops concerts. Today, established American orchestras that once didn’t look at the merging of screen and music seriously, take heed of live-to-picture performances as very big business, with concert halls packing in audiences around the world.

That’s something of a surprise, considering how most classical musicians had traditionally looked down their collective noses at movie music. “Film music was a pejorative, and that was the end of it,” David Newman says. Now they see the attendance figures, and attitudes have changed considerably.

Indeed, just a month ago, the New York Philharmonic completed a three-week, four-film “Star Wars” series with Newman conducting John Williams’ scores for the original trilogy plus “The Force Awakens” to sold-out crowds at New York’s David Geffen Hall. “The orchestra absolutely killed it,” says Newman.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

DVD Review: Beyond The Seventh Door (1987)

  • DailyDead
Ambition should never be a dirty word, especially when it comes to micro-budget movies. Especially micro-budget movies shot on a camcorder starring a Yugoslavian actor who goes by the amazing moniker "Lazar Rockwood." Which brings us to the kind of amazing Canadian-made Cube/Saw prototype Beyond the Seventh Door (1987), lovingly presented on DVD by Intervision, who never fail to cover all of your shot-on-video needs.

Released to Toronto cable, Bozidar Benedikt's (also a Yugoslavian immigrant, and the author of over 20 novels to boot) full-length feature debut is incredibly simple in structure and execution, but has a quirky charm thanks to its high concept and even higher lead performance from Rockwood.

Boris (Rockwood - Witchblade), a small-time thief, has just been released from prison, and his first stop is a grungy café where he meets up with his ex-girlfriend Wendy (Bonnie Beck – The Making of a Hollywood Madam), who has a
See full article at DailyDead »

Joe Johnston says The Chronicles of Narnia: The Silver Chair will be his last film

Back in April of this year it was announced that Captain America: The First Avenger director Joe Johnston is set to revive the Chronicles of Narnia franchise with an adaptation of C.S. LewisThe Silver Chair.

The filmmaker has been giving an update on the project at a convention in Paris, where he also revealed that it is likely to be his final feature film.

“That’s the plan,” said Johnson when asked if it will be his last movie (via Arts). “It will take a couple of years to make the film as we won’t be able to start shooting next winter in New Zealand, on the South Island – it’ll be summer down there – and post and the visual effects will take another year and it’ll be 2019, and I think I’m ready to go do something else. I have a lot of dogs, and they demand long walks every day.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Movie Review – The Gatehouse (2016)

The Gatehouse, 2016.

Directed by Martin Gooch.

Starring Scarlett Rayner, Simeon Willis, Linal Haft, Paul Freeman, Hannah Waddingham, Alix Wilton Regan, and Melissa Knatchbull.

Synopsis:

Precocious ten-year old Eternity (Scarlett Rayner) lives in a gatehouse at the edge of an ancient forest with her father (Simeon Willis). She likes to dig for buried treasure in the woods, but one day she digs up something she shouldn’t and the forest wants it back.

You wait for one genre film about unwitting victims being picked off in the woods, and you get forests worth of flicks all at once. Following on from Blair Witch, The Woods, and the film with which this shares the closest DNA, in idea if not execution, Corin Hardy’s The Hallows, we get this micro-budgeted tale of schlocky horror.

Martin Gooch’s The Gatehouse is a drinking game’s worth of horror tropes, thrown together as a tonally haphazard monster mash.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

September/October. It's a Wrap

Since the bulk of September and October are given over to festival life each year (here's all that business wrapped up for you) there's less time for randomness which is in some ways our favorite thing about blogging about the cinema. But since we haven't done an Icymi best of since August, here are 16 things you might have missed that you should check out:

This is Halloween Salim's cinematic evocation of the season The Furniture: The Beguiled Daniel gazes into the plaster haze Elizabeth Debicki as Virginia Woolf Murtada takes a first look Martyr Mothers of Aronofsky Jorge wonders if the director has mommy issues? Two for the Road (1967) Tim's fiftieth anniversary revisit Podcast 9.9 Battle of the Sexes, Beach Rats and mother! discussed Academy Expels Weinstein Nathaniel sees the end of an era Smackdown 85 The Color Purple, Agnes of God, and more 5 Takeaways from the Success of It Spencer lists
See full article at FilmExperience »

Danny Trejo Shows Off His Killer Comedic Chops on ‘The Flash’ -- But He’s Still Out for Blood!

Danny Trejo Shows Off His Killer Comedic Chops on ‘The Flash’ -- But He’s Still Out for Blood!
Danny Trejo is one of Hollywood’s most famous bad guys, but he’s showing off his softer side -- er, sort of -- on this week’s episode of The Flash!

In Tuesday’s all-new ep, titled “Elongated Journey Into Night,” Trejo stars as Breacher, one of the “most feared and dangerous bounty hunters in the multiverse.” Oh yeah, and he’s also Gypsy’s dad.

Breacher comes calling on Earth-1 at a particularly inopportune time for Gypsy (Jessica Camacho) and Cisco (Carlos Valdes) -- and immediately threatens to hunt down and kill his daughter’s boyfriend. But it turns out, the process of getting Trejo to agree to the cameo was much less painful.

“Once the image of it being Danny came into our heads, we sort of couldn’t imagine anybody else doing it,” executive producer Andrew Kreisberg told reporters earlier this week. “I think a lot of times, you don’t ask because
See full article at Entertainment Tonight »

DuckTales revival: the comics to read before you watch

Paul Bullock Nov 7, 2017

With a preview of the new DuckTales arriving in the UK this month, we look at the comics to read as background...

The return of DuckTales (a wooo-oooo!) has brought about renewed interest in the adventures of Scrooge McDuck, his n’er-do-well nephew Donald and the world’s most famous Junior Woodchucks Huey, Dewey and Louie. It may still be in its first season over in the Us, but the new series has already received high praise, with critics citing as a major positive the reverence it has towards legendary comics writer and artist Carl Barks.

See related Mr Robot interview: Sam Esmail on hackers, Fight Club Why Mr Robot is Fight Club’s spiritual successor

For those not familiar with his work, Barks is a Disney legend who originally joined the studio in 1935 as an inbetweener - an artist who creates the frames in between the
See full article at Den of Geek »

How the film score has entered the mainstream

Sean Wilson looks at the rise in popularity of soundtrack concerts…

It’s Friday October 20th 2017. I step into the crowded, expectant Royal Albert Hall to witness Rogue One composer Michael Giacchino’s 50th birthday celebration. Within the comforting circular space so famous from the BBC Proms, the sense of excitement is palpable. And, as is always the case with live soundtrack concerts, I’m once again struck by the sheer age spread of those who have turned up.

Young, old, teenage, middle-age – a remarkably diverse crowd has turned out to watch Giacchino bring the musical fireworks, everyone from young kids to adults and grandparents. It’s another heartening reminder of the power soundtrack music wields in evoking the memories of our favourite movies, even when separated from its symbiotic twin, the moving image.

Indeed, it’s often argued that only the very best film scores work when separated from their respective movies,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Why David Fincher Is Right And Wrong About Marvel

Neil Calloway asks whether making movies for Marvel is what directors want…

David Fincher has become the latest director to stick his oar in and have a slight pop at Marvel studios. Nothing surprising there, it’s sort of his job to fly the flag for grown up drama and it’s certainly his job to get the word out about his new Netflix show. It won’t harm Marvel Studios at all; at the moment it looks like nothing will damage that juggernaut.

It’s sort of what indie film-makers do now; slag off comic book movies, and retain the moral high ground in a way that only a man who used to direct Paula Abdul and Madonna videos can. Of course, there’s a reason we should listen to David Fincher when he talks about young directors and the dangers they face when helming a big film; he’s been there.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Lumière Festival: Guillermo del Toro on the Catholic Church, his Holy Trinity and Boris Karloff Epiphany

Lumière Festival: Guillermo del Toro on the Catholic Church, his Holy Trinity and Boris Karloff Epiphany
Lyon, France — In a wide-ranging discussion at Lyon’s Lumière Festival on Monday, Guillermo del Toro talked about the creative and disturbing influence of the Catholic Church, his own personal Holy Trinity, the unique aspects of cinema, his desire to work with Michael Mann and George Miller on a book project and his Boris Karloff-inspired epiphany.

Asked how he is able to translate nightmares into beautiful dreams, Del Toro quipped, “I had a f****d up childhood.”

The imagery of Mexico’s Catholic Church, which Del Toro described as second only to that of the Philippines in goriness and anatomical accurateness, was a main factor.

“There was a Christ in my church with an exposed bone fracture, and it was kind of green and purple, but his face looked like he was coming. And then they said, ‘The body of Christ,’ and I said, ‘No thank you.’

“In Guadalajara, of all f*****g cities,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

10 Things We Learned From HBO's 'Spielberg' Documentary

10 Things We Learned From HBO's 'Spielberg' Documentary
Susan Lacy's documentary Spielberg debuts October 7th on HBO, trots out an all-star team of interviewees – from film critics to famous friends, the Toms (Cruise and Hanks) to God herself, a.k.a. Oprah Winfrey. The voices film buffs will undoubtedly want to hear from the most, however, belong to his fellow "movie brats": Francis Ford Coppola, Brian De Palma, George Lucas and Martin Scorsese, who all talk at length about their heady New Hollywood days alongside Spielberg in the early Seventies. All of them partied together, bounced
See full article at Rolling Stone »

New York Film Review: ‘Spielberg’

New York Film Review: ‘Spielberg’
It’s never been an all-out love-him-or-hate-him thing — though you can always find a cinephile purist or two to grouse about him, with a fervor as irrational as it is intense. That said, there’s an undeniable Beatles-person-vs.-Stones-person quality to the following debate: Either you think that Steven Spielberg is a genius, that he’s created an array of films — not just the early ones — that are suffused with a transporting vision, with a flow of feeling and a camera-eye intuition unique in the history of cinema; or you think that Spielberg is a gifted fabulist trickster with more flash than depth, the kind of brilliant but ultimately facile entertainer who deserves to be called things like “manipulative,” “sentimental,” “crowd-pleasing,” and — yes — “shallow.”

If you’re in the latter camp, then you probably won’t respond much to “Spielberg,” an unabashedly admiring two-hour-and-27-minute documentary portrait of the man and (mostly) his movies that premiered tonight
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘Spielberg’: Why Director Susan Lacy’s Documentary Was Therapy for the Legendary Auteur

‘Spielberg’: Why Director Susan Lacy’s Documentary Was Therapy for the Legendary Auteur
Steven Spielberg says he’s never seen a licensed therapist — but director Susan Lacy, who sat down 17 times with the legendary director to craft the documentary “Spielberg,” might have been the next best thing.

“I asked him if he’d ever done therapy, and he said ‘no, but I think I’m doing it with you,'” Lacy told IndieWire. “I almost put that in the film, but I didn’t want to make myself a part of it. But he did say that films were his therapy. He worked out his issues through his films.”

It’s the sort of revelation that speaks to the intense endeavor that Lacy’s film ended up being. A deep dive into the psyche of the auteur behind decades worth of pop culture, “Spielberg,” debuts at the New York Film Festival before its HBO premiere. Over two-and-a-half hours long, Spielberg as both as
See full article at Indiewire Television »

‘Spielberg’: Why Director Susan Lacy’s Documentary Was Therapy for the Legendary Auteur

  • Indiewire
‘Spielberg’: Why Director Susan Lacy’s Documentary Was Therapy for the Legendary Auteur
Steven Spielberg says he’s never seen a licensed therapist — but director Susan Lacy, who sat down 17 times with the legendary director to craft the documentary “Spielberg,” might have been the next best thing.

“I asked him if he’d ever done therapy, and he said ‘no, but I think I’m doing it with you,'” Lacy told IndieWire. “I almost put that in the film, but I didn’t want to make myself a part of it. But he did say that films were his therapy. He worked out his issues through his films.”

It’s the sort of revelation that speaks to the intense endeavor that Lacy’s film ended up being. A deep dive into the psyche of the auteur behind decades worth of pop culture, “Spielberg,” debuts at the New York Film Festival before its HBO premiere. Over two-and-a-half hours long, Spielberg as both as
See full article at Indiewire »

Best TV Shows to See in October: 'Curb,' Tracy Morgan and 'The Walking Dead'

If we had to look for a theme for this month's TV offerings, we might go with: Chaos Reigns. Crazy Ex-Girlfriend promises to devote its third season to a revenge plot; the one-man disruptive force known as Larry David resuscitates his antisocial HBO masterpiece Curb Your Enthusiasm; Fox's new superhero show The Gifted features mutants on the run from government-sanctioned extermination; Riverdale is back with more warped Archie sex and violence; and The Walking Dead returns with both hungry "walkers" and all-out war. All this, and brand new Dynasty remake.
See full article at Rolling Stone »

The Essential Harrison Ford

In the build up to the release of Blade Runner 2049 [read our review here], Tom Jolliffe looks at the essential films of the key cast, starting with Harrison Ford

A long, varied and fine career has seen Ford become iconic in two franchises in particular (and indeed the upcoming reprise of Rick Deckard could well make that another).

Throughout the 80’s he became firmly established as the ultimate blockbuster icon. No one has quite hit such iconic and consistent status as Harrison Ford. We’re talking Han Solo and Indiana Jones. One beloved franchise character is something every star dreams of, but to get two, on top of all the other great roles he’s had? That’s astonishing.

So in celebration of Ford, and in no particular order, here are the five films that need to be watched to best appreciate the man’s gifts and star power.

Witness

Ford is well-considered
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Steven Spielberg Doesn't Watch His Own Movies--Except for One

  • E! Online
Steven Spielberg Doesn't Watch His Own Movies--Except for One
The Spielberg name in the film industry is as close to royalty as it gets. Who in their right mind has the heart to turn off classics like Jurassic Park, Indiana Jones and the Raiders of the Lost Ark and Schindler's List? Well, apparently, Steven Spielberg does. The auteur is currently promoting the upcoming HBO documentary Spielberg, which chronicles his nearly 50-year career as a film director. Starting in the '70s, Spielberg is responsible for some of the most well-known and equally well-liked stories about the human spirit. Audiences and critics agree that his storytelling techniques and captivation of the imagination have revolutionized the industry. E! News spoke to...
See full article at E! Online »

Stars come out to praise Steven Spielberg in trailer for new HBO documentary

  • JoBlo
Whether you count yourself as a fan or not, it's hard to deny the incredible impact which Steven Spielberg has made on the film-making industry. Can you dare to imagine a world in which Jaws, Close Encounters Of The Third Kind, Jurassic Park, Schindler's List, Saving Private Ryan, or, my personal favourite film of all-time, Raiders Of The Lost Ark, just didn't exist? No thank you. A new... Read More...
See full article at JoBlo »
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