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1-20 of 152 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


Lumière Festival: Guillermo del Toro on the Catholic Church, his Holy Trinity and Boris Karloff Epiphany

23 hours ago | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Lyon, France  —  In a wide-ranging discussion at Lyon’s Lumière Festival on Monday, Guillermo del Toro talked about the creative and disturbing influence of the Catholic Church, his own personal Holy Trinity, the unique aspects of cinema, his desire to work with Michael Mann and George Miller on a book project and his Boris Karloff-inspired epiphany.

Asked how he is able to translate nightmares into beautiful dreams, Del Toro quipped, “I had a f****d up childhood.”

The imagery of Mexico’s Catholic Church, which Del Toro described as second only to that of the Philippines in goriness and anatomical accurateness, was a main factor.

“There was a Christ in my church with an exposed bone fracture, and it was kind of green and purple, but his face looked like he was coming. And then they said, ‘The body of Christ,’ and I said, ‘No thank you.’

“In Guadalajara, of all f*****g cities, »

- Ed Meza

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10 Things We Learned From HBO's 'Spielberg' Documentary

6 October 2017 5:45 AM, PDT | Rollingstone.com | See recent Rolling Stone news »

Susan Lacy's documentary Spielberg debuts October 7th on HBO, trots out an all-star team of interviewees – from film critics to famous friends, the Toms (Cruise and Hanks) to God herself, a.k.a. Oprah Winfrey. The voices film buffs will undoubtedly want to hear from the most, however, belong to his fellow "movie brats": Francis Ford Coppola, Brian De Palma, George Lucas and Martin Scorsese, who all talk at length about their heady New Hollywood days alongside Spielberg in the early Seventies. All of them partied together, bounced »

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New York Film Review: ‘Spielberg’

5 October 2017 9:00 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

It’s never been an all-out love-him-or-hate-him thing — though you can always find a cinephile purist or two to grouse about him, with a fervor as irrational as it is intense. That said, there’s an undeniable Beatles-person-vs.-Stones-person quality to the following debate: Either you think that Steven Spielberg is a genius, that he’s created an array of films — not just the early ones — that are suffused with a transporting vision, with a flow of feeling and a camera-eye intuition unique in the history of cinema; or you think that Spielberg is a gifted fabulist trickster with more flash than depth, the kind of brilliant but ultimately facile entertainer who deserves to be called things like “manipulative,” “sentimental,” “crowd-pleasing,” and — yes — “shallow.”

If you’re in the latter camp, then you probably won’t respond much to “Spielberg,” an unabashedly admiring two-hour-and-27-minute documentary portrait of the man and (mostly) his movies that premiered tonight »

- Owen Gleiberman

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‘Spielberg’: Why Director Susan Lacy’s Documentary Was Therapy for the Legendary Auteur

5 October 2017 6:00 AM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

Steven Spielberg says he’s never seen a licensed therapist — but director Susan Lacy, who sat down 17 times with the legendary director to craft the documentary “Spielberg,” might have been the next best thing.

“I asked him if he’d ever done therapy, and he said ‘no, but I think I’m doing it with you,'” Lacy told IndieWire. “I almost put that in the film, but I didn’t want to make myself a part of it. But he did say that films were his therapy. He worked out his issues through his films.”

It’s the sort of revelation that speaks to the intense endeavor that Lacy’s film ended up being. A deep dive into the psyche of the auteur behind decades worth of pop culture, “Spielberg,” debuts at the New York Film Festival before its HBO premiere. Over two-and-a-half hours long, Spielberg as both as »

- Liz Shannon Miller

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‘Spielberg’: Why Director Susan Lacy’s Documentary Was Therapy for the Legendary Auteur

5 October 2017 6:00 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Steven Spielberg says he’s never seen a licensed therapist — but director Susan Lacy, who sat down 17 times with the legendary director to craft the documentary “Spielberg,” might have been the next best thing.

“I asked him if he’d ever done therapy, and he said ‘no, but I think I’m doing it with you,'” Lacy told IndieWire. “I almost put that in the film, but I didn’t want to make myself a part of it. But he did say that films were his therapy. He worked out his issues through his films.”

It’s the sort of revelation that speaks to the intense endeavor that Lacy’s film ended up being. A deep dive into the psyche of the auteur behind decades worth of pop culture, “Spielberg,” debuts at the New York Film Festival before its HBO premiere. Over two-and-a-half hours long, Spielberg as both as »

- Liz Shannon Miller

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Best TV Shows to See in October: 'Curb,' Tracy Morgan and 'The Walking Dead'

2 October 2017 6:24 AM, PDT | Rollingstone.com | See recent Rolling Stone news »

If we had to look for a theme for this month's TV offerings, we might go with: Chaos Reigns. Crazy Ex-Girlfriend promises to devote its third season to a revenge plot; the one-man disruptive force known as Larry David resuscitates his antisocial HBO masterpiece Curb Your Enthusiasm; Fox's new superhero show The Gifted features mutants on the run from government-sanctioned extermination; Riverdale is back with more warped Archie sex and violence; and The Walking Dead returns with both hungry "walkers" and all-out war. All this, and brand new Dynasty remake. »

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The Essential Harrison Ford

29 September 2017 4:29 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

In the build up to the release of Blade Runner 2049 [read our review here], Tom Jolliffe looks at the essential films of the key cast, starting with Harrison Ford

A long, varied and fine career has seen Ford become iconic in two franchises in particular (and indeed the upcoming reprise of Rick Deckard could well make that another).

Throughout the 80’s he became firmly established as the ultimate blockbuster icon. No one has quite hit such iconic and consistent status as Harrison Ford. We’re talking Han Solo and Indiana Jones. One beloved franchise character is something every star dreams of, but to get two, on top of all the other great roles he’s had? That’s astonishing.

So in celebration of Ford, and in no particular order, here are the five films that need to be watched to best appreciate the man’s gifts and star power.

Witness

Ford is well-considered »

- Tom Jolliffe

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Steven Spielberg Doesn't Watch His Own Movies--Except for One

27 September 2017 12:03 PM, PDT | E! Online | See recent E! Online news »

The Spielberg name in the film industry is as close to royalty as it gets. Who in their right mind has the heart to turn off classics like Jurassic Park, Indiana Jones and the Raiders of the Lost Ark and Schindler's List? Well, apparently, Steven Spielberg does. The auteur is currently promoting the upcoming HBO documentary Spielberg, which chronicles his nearly 50-year career as a film director. Starting in the '70s, Spielberg is responsible for some of the most well-known and equally well-liked stories about the human spirit. Audiences and critics agree that his storytelling techniques and captivation of the imagination have revolutionized the industry. E! News spoke to »

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Stars come out to praise Steven Spielberg in trailer for new HBO documentary

25 September 2017 6:38 PM, PDT | JoBlo.com | See recent JoBlo news »

Whether you count yourself as a fan or not, it's hard to deny the incredible impact which Steven Spielberg has made on the film-making industry. Can you dare to imagine a world in which Jaws, Close Encounters Of The Third Kind, Jurassic Park, Schindler's List, Saving Private Ryan, or, my personal favourite film of all-time, Raiders Of The Lost Ark, just didn't exist? No thank you. A new... Read More »

- Kevin Fraser

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HBO's Spielberg Documentary Trailer Explores the Genius Behind the Director

24 September 2017 12:00 PM, PDT | MovieWeb | See recent MovieWeb news »

HBO has released the new trailer for its upcoming documentary Spielberg. One of the most famous filmmakers in the world, Steven Spielberg pulls back the curtain on his remarkable career more than ever before in the exclusive HBO presentation Spielberg. The feature-length documentary examines Spielberg's filmography in depth, revealing how his experiences fed his work and changed it over time. Directed and produced by award-winning documentarian Susan Lacy, this unprecedented chronicle debuts Saturday, October 7, exclusively on HBO. The documentary will also be available on HBO Now, HBO Go, HBO On Demand and affiliate portals.

Steven Spielberg has built an unrivaled catalogue of groundbreaking films over the course of his nearly 50-year career. Charting the evolution of this iconic figure, Lacy draws on nearly 30 hours of exclusive interviews with the director, who opens up about his bittersweet childhood and lifelong obsession with moviemaking, his precocious early work as a TV "wunderkind, »

- MovieWeb

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‘Spielberg’ Trailer: The Master Filmmaker Goes In Front Of The Camera

23 September 2017 11:27 AM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

A master filmmaker (and no, this isn’t an argument), director Steven Spielberg has been turning out modern movie classics for decades and has contributed dozens of unimpeachable treasures to cinema. Movies will be unimaginably poorer the day he is gone. Opinions may vary on just what film is the best Spielberg film, from the landmark action-adventure film “Raiders of the Lost Ark” to pictures that have reinvented the way “monster movies” are presented with “Jaws” and “Jurassic Park,” to his more dramatic and weighty films movies such as “Schindler’s List,” “Saving Private Ryan” “Bridge of Spies” and “Lincoln.

Continue reading ‘Spielberg’ Trailer: The Master Filmmaker Goes In Front Of The Camera at The Playlist. »

- Ally Johnson

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10 Facts You Might Not Know About Blade Runner

13 September 2017 7:16 AM, PDT | Cineplex | See recent Cineplex news »

10 Facts You Might Not Know About Blade Runner10 Facts You Might Not Know About Blade RunnerKurt Anthony9/13/2017 9:16:00 Am

Thirty-five years ago, from Ridley Scott, director of Alien, came Blade Runner – a chilling, bold, mesmerizing, and futuristic detective thriller.

Adapted from Philip K. Dick’s visionary novel, Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?, Blade Runner was released in theatres on June 25, 1982 and has since earned the title of one of the best science fiction films of all time.

Despite the film’s estimated budget of $28M, Blade Runner was not an instant success. The complex plot and slow pacing resulted in low box office numbers, but the dystopian sci-fi classic eventually garnered a cult following and became a leading example of the neo-noir genre.

While we await the highly anticipated release of Blade Runner 2049, the long-awaited sequel, journey with us to the savage world of the year 2019 as »

- Kurt Anthony

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Rube Goldberg Machines in Movies

13 September 2017 4:02 AM, PDT | Cinelinx | See recent Cinelinx news »

Rube Goldberg machines are deliberately complex contraptions that use simple motion to carry out larger tasks. This is a look at some of the most impressive Rube Goldberg machines in film.

Rube Goldberg was an engineer-turned cartoonist who is most famous for the animated contraptions he drew. Goldberg used engineering principles to create fun diagrams of machines which performed simple tasks in complicated ways. Most often his machines were designed to perform everyday household tasks in zany, creative ways. He used a lot of unconventional techniques and materials to create these contraptions.

Due to the fun nature of Goldberg’s animated and real-world creations, it is no surprise that he has had an impact on film. Since film is a visual medium in motion, it is actually the perfect way for Goldberg’s unique machines to come alive. This is a look at some of the best Rube goldberg-inspired machines, »

- feeds@cinelinx.com (G.S. Perno)

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Visual Effects Society: The Top 70 VFX Films of All Time Include ‘Star Wars,’ ‘Blade Runner,’ and ‘Citizen Kane’

12 September 2017 2:32 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

In honor of its 20th anniversary, the Visual Effects Society polled its membership to list the 70 most influential VFX films of all time. James Cameron led the pack with six entries (“The Abyss,” “Aliens,” “Avatar,” “Terminator,” “Terminator 2: Judgment Day,” and “Titanic”); Steven Spielberg followed close behind with five (“Close Encounters of the Third Kind,” “E.T. the Extraterrestrial,” “Jaws,” “Raiders of the Lost Ark,” and “Jurassic Park”); and Peter Jackson had four Oscar winners (“The Lord of the Rings” trilogy and “King Kong”).

“The Ves 70 represents films that have had a significant, lasting impact on the practice and appreciation of visual effects as an integral element of cinematic expression and storytelling,” said Ves board chair Mike Chambers. “We see this as an important opportunity for our members, leading visual effects practitioners worldwide, to pay homage to our heritage and help shape the future of the global visual effects community. In »

- Bill Desowitz

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Harrison Ford Directs Traffic During New York Tunnel Backup

11 September 2017 3:13 PM, PDT | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

If this whole acting thing doesn’t work out for Harrison Ford, he might have a bright future as a traffic cop. The “Star Wars” and “Raiders of the Lost Ark” star showed off his traffic-directing abilities in New York over the weekend, after a tunnel backup caused his car to be blocked in. And because we live in a wonderful age where everything is captured on camera, footage of the show-stopping — but traffic-enabling — performance has made its way onto the internet. According to TMZ, which published the video, Ford got out of his car on Sunday after a backup. »

- Tim Kenneally

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Raider of the Lost Cars! Harrison Ford Directs N.Y.C. Traffic: 'Let's Go, Get Out!'

11 September 2017 2:09 PM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Indiana Jones has turned into a traffic cop.

Harrison Ford was spotted directing New York City traffic on Sunday, after his car got trapped in a backup around the Midtown tunnel. Part of the incident was caught on a video later posted to TMZ.

The Raiders of the Lost Ark star, who’s also no stranger to playing cops onscreen, was seen standing in the middle of a crowded intersection, waving his arms and shouting directions at a couple of vehicles blocking his ride.

“Let’s go, get out!” Ford can be heard yelling on the video.

The people recording »

- Mike Miller

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Will Marion Ravenwood Return in Indiana Jones 5?

9 September 2017 8:43 AM, PDT | MovieWeb | See recent MovieWeb news »

The Indiana Jones 5 story is finished, but details are being kept under tight lock and key until further drafts of the screenplay can be hammered out and perfected. We know for certain that Harrison Ford will reprise his role as Dr. Henry Jones Jr. We also know that there is no way the franchise is bringing back Shia Labeouf and his character Mutt Williams. But one lingering question does remain. Will we see the return of Marion Ravenwood, played by the ravishing Karen Allen?

It makes sense that we'd see her in some capacity. She first debuted in Raiders of the Lost Ark way back in 1981. And no other female character in the franchise has ever been able to carry the same kind of torch. Ravenwood did turn back up in the last installment, Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull. She didn't just put in a cameo, »

- MovieWeb

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“Year by the Sea” Star Karen Allen on Joan Anderson’s Book, Directing, and Roles for Women Over 60

7 September 2017 1:01 PM, PDT | Women and Hollywood | See recent Women and Hollywood news »

Karen Allen in “Year by the Sea

Probably best-known for her turns in “Raiders of the Lost Ark” and the “Christmas Carol” retelling “Scrooged,” Karen Allen has been working regularly since her 1978 debut in “Animal House.” She serves as a theater actor and director in addition to acting onscreen in projects like “In the Bedroom,” “Law & Order,” and “Blue Bloods.” Allen recently made her directorial film debut with “A Tree a Rock a Cloud.” The short is adapted from a Carson McCullers story about a random, but significant, conversation between a boy and an older man. Allen’s latest project is Alexander Janko’s “Year by the Sea,” a portrait of a newly single woman rebuilding her life in Cape Cod, Massachusetts. The film is based on Joan Anderson’s bestselling memoir of the same name.

We sat down with Allen to talk about her connection to Anderson and the book, the way Hollywood treats women over 60, and why she decided to try her hand at film directing.

Year by the Sea” opens in New York September 8 and in Los Angeles September 15. A national theatrical release will follow.

This interview has been edited. It was transcribed by Lyra Hale.

W&H: I really wanted to ask you how you became involved in the film?

Ka: I was just at home and I got the screenplay, which was sent to me, and I read it and thought, “I didn’t know Joan’s work,” which is odd because we have a lot of similar pathways in our lives. It’s kind of surprising that we never met each other, that the book never came into my world. But I finished reading the script and I went right out and got the book and I sat with the book and I thought the book was quite courageous.

This was a woman who had reached a crisis moment in her life, who was taking a very clear tough-minded look at herself, and had made some decisions about just wanting to get to know herself. She was interested in that authentic self underneath all the things that she had piled onto herself over the years in terms of other people’s expectations and she just wanted to somehow — instinctively she knew in order to survive, and in order to really find herself, she was going to have to figure out how to let a lot of that fall away, go back, and really get to know herself again.

I found that very inspiring and moving. I went to meet the director and I was very open about how much I would love to play the role and about a week later they offered it to me. I met Joan and I spent some time with her, and we had a wonderful connection, which has stayed to this day.

I had a great time making the film. She was there but she didn’t interfere in any way at all. She let us do our thing. And I was playing her 25 years before the time period where I met her, so I wasn’t really playing the woman I was meeting. I was playing a woman who was at a much different part of the journey than she’s on right now.

W&H: I felt like this journey was about how women take on other people’s baggage and lose their own selves. It’s kind of a very common theme with women as they get older. So I would imagine that this would resonate a lot with women.

Ka: With women and certainly with anybody who’s ever been a parent. We don’t mean to do it, we don’t necessarily aspire to do it, but we fall in love with our children and we want to care for them, support them, educate them, and help them, in every way we can.

They become this daily rhythm and part of our lives and when they suddenly grow up and leave you feel this huge piece of yourself is missing because you really have adapted, grown, changed, and become a person who is a caretaker.

In spite of everything, you really do feel — and unlike Joan, I worked all through the raising of my child. I made tough decisions about what kind of work I would do and I stopped doing some of the really far-flung travels that I had been doing earlier in my life because it began to feel very unfair to pull my son out of school for three or four months and take him to somewhere where he would sit in a hotel room with a tutor or babysitter while I went off and worked 14 hours a day, six days a week. It just didn’t seem like a way of life that I wanted to embrace or that I wanted him to have to embrace. So I made choices that I felt were in support of him in terms of my working life.

And I think in Joan’s case, she’s a published writer, and she just put that on hold to raise two children and had a husband was very much involved in his work. She took on the role of parent and looking after their world. It’s an important role but it’s a role that ends at a certain point. It’s not a role that you’re going to have for life.

W&H: Hollywood has so many issues with women who are over 40 and here is a movie with women who are over 60 embarking on exciting things in their lives, and I’m just wondering what it felt like for you to be in a movie with women who are 60?

Ka: Well, I was thrilled because there just aren’t just that many films that come around. If I read a script with a role for a 60-year-old woman, it’s usually in some capacity of a grandmother, a mother, or a boss. They’re not fully realized characters. To have the opportunity to play a role like Joan Anderson, work with Celia Imrie, and Epatha Merkerson, as my two co-stars, and Michael Cristofer — all of us being over 60 — it just seemed like such a rare experience to have.

W&H: Well, it is. How many scripts do you actually get from your agents, to read?

Ka: I have scripts that come to me from all over the place. I just directed my first film and I’ve been out at film festivals with it.

From my agents, in the course of a year, in a good year, there could be 30 and a tough year maybe half that. Many of them are not ones I would really consider very seriously just because I don’t think they’re particularly film worthy. I work a lot in the theater, both directing and acting, and in the theater very rarely does the play end up on a major stage unless it’s really remarkable. So you don’t kind of have that same dilemma in the theater.

I come from, I feel like, a very real and extraordinary generation of actresses. And I’ve grown up with them all. I was in New York at the age of 25 and I pretty much know, if not know them well or personally, I certainly have met most of the actresses of my generation at one point or another, or had the pleasure of working with them. It’s a wonderful large and fantastic generation of actresses and I don’t see nearly enough of them on screen. It actually breaks my heart how I can think of 40 names right now who I just feel like I don’t get to see anymore.

W&H: Let’s talk a little bit about why you ventured into film directing. You said you’ve done a lot of theater, and why were you tempted into making the film that you did?

Ka: I’ve been directing in the theater for awhile and a producer who I had to work with in New York, who had produced play I had directed, that won an Obie [Off-Broadway Theater Award], was sitting with me one day and he said, “Why not film? Why have you kind of shied away from directing a film?” And I said, “I don’t know that I’ve shied away from it. It just seems to me like I’ve spent my adult life on film sets and I can’t for a second fool myself or be naive enough not to know what a large undertaking it is to make a film.”

For a director it can be two to three years really committed to one project. And as an actor I’m at times committed for three to four months, but that’s usually the longest. So it’s another way of approaching a project. It’s like saying, “Gee, I’m going to be doing this for 3 years.”

So he and I continued to talk and I said, “If I were going to do a film I would want to be wise and do a short film. I would want it to be a certain kind of film that I felt I could really do well, that would play on all my strengths so that I would really have a positive experience making it and not go into it feeling completely overwhelmed.”

I have seen many first-time directors with that deer-in-the-headlights look. I’m very familiar with it. I’ve worked with a lot of first-time directors in film. So we continued with that conversation and he finally said, “If you were going to do it, what would it be? And I said, “There’s a story of Carson McCullers’ that I’ve thought about for 40 years.”

It’s just been something that had sat there in my head for a very long time. And he said, “I would love to help you do this.” And then we brought on another producer, Diane Pearlman, who was with me in Cannes, who I don’t know if you’ve met her, she runs with Berkshire Film and Media Collaborative in Western Massachusetts. Then we moved forward and just decided to do it. And it has taken three years.

We’re still working on it and I was able to bring many, many women onto the crew of our film. I had a female first A.D. [assistant director], a female production designer, and a female costume designer. We were female rich, which was a great joy.

I decided to open up my world to directing about 10 years ago because I don’t want my creative life to be limited by whether there’s an interesting role for me at 65. I love telling stories and I love developing projects and I don’t see any reason why I’d have to be in them for me to be involved.

So it makes for a very enriching experience for me to also embrace working as a director because, you know, particularly in the playwriting world there are so many plays that I love, so many playwrights whose work I love, where there isn’t a role for me.

W&H: What did you learn as an actor working with first-time directors, that you took into being a director?

Ka: One of the main lessons is preparation, preparation, preparation.

If you show up on the set the first day and you have really done the work; have a sense of how you want to shoot the film, know the material, chosen the right actors, and you know your actors and you have done the work with them to know you’re on the same wavelength. If you’ve done the work then you can actually be very calm, clear-minded, and put your attention where it needs to go when you’re actually shooting.

I somehow felt like those were lessons that I had gathered over my 35 to 45 years of being on sets. And it seemed to me like the sets that were successful and the people who were really able to bring out their best, came from that kind of calmness in the director, because they knew what they were doing, they knew where they were going. They had a shot list, they knew how they wanted to shoot a scene, and yet they were prepared and open. Prepared and yet open. And I think actually to be open you need to be prepared.

So I tried to emulate that, and I actually feel I was quite successful at it, that I was a bit of a whirling dervish for about four months during preparation. And probably drove everybody crazy because I was into so much of the minutiae and I just wanted to make sure everything was explored and every decision was sort of looked at from all different angles.

It paid off in spades when I got on set with my actors.

W&H: That’s good advice. I would imagine that you have gotten the bug now and you want to direct more film?

Ka: Well, I’m really willing to take it a little bit at a time. At Cannes I had three scripts that were sent to me after people saw my film that were in various phases of development. None of them are fully funded.

The more my film gets out there into the world — we’ve been going to film festivals, we’ve won a number of awards — and the more that the film is being seen by people, the more attention I am getting as a director.

So it feels as though if I do want to do that, I could move in that direction, which is great. It’s lovely to feel like there’s a door opening up for me. So I’ll just see. One of the most difficult aspects of making this short film was that we raised the money ourselves. And it was one of the most difficult things I’ve ever had to do in my life. I don’t think I’m particularly skilled at it.

W&H: Last question: You’ve been in movies that have been so seminal to so many people. I was just wondering, what does it feel to be in films that have had such profound effects on people?

Ka: You know, that’s such a hard question to answer. It feels like often it just feels like such a privilege to have had a chance to work in the film world and to be hired to do all these wonderful roles. I had this wonderful period in my life, maybe for 15 years, where I was really working in an ongoing way, being offered really wonderful projects that I just loved every minute of. And now to still be doing it.

I don’t get offered all the great projects. I’m not on anybody’s A list for the next whatever. But I still keep working in independent films and in the theater. I’ve started to direct a couple films and you know it’s been such an incredible journey and I don’t know what it feels like for other people and their experiences. I know sometimes people are just, they love some of the films so much — “Starman” or “Raiders of the Lost Ark.”

It comes back to me sometimes in the most surprising ways and I can’t imagine having done anything else in my life. And certainly the first 22 years of my life I couldn’t have imagined anything like this was possible. I’d never met an actress or seen a play. I’d seen films. I loved films. I love to watch films. That world seemed a million miles away to me.

https://medium.com/media/2f0b4d8a500b0d970e07fb2024cfbd4f/href

Year by the Sea” Star Karen Allen on Joan Anderson’s Book, Directing, and Roles for Women Over 60 was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story. »

- Melissa Silverstein

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American Gothic (1988) Blu-ray Release Date & Cover Art Revealed by Scream Factory

6 September 2017 2:49 PM, PDT | DailyDead | See recent DailyDead news »

After taking viewers into Hell House and journeying to Witch Mountain, director John Hough introduced moviegoers to an island where strangers are sinners, and "Ma" and "Pa" aren't afraid to dole out lethal punishment. Initially announced during Scream Factory's Comic-Con reveals, the American Gothic (1988) Blu-ray now has an official December release date and cover (featuring the film's original poster art):

From Scream Factory: "We are now taking pre-orders for our upcoming release of the eccentric stranded-on-an-island 1988 thriller American Gothic which makes its Blu-ray format debut! Release date is planned for December 19th.

When six young friends fly off on a weekend getaway and suddenly find themselves with engine trouble, they have no choice but to land on a remote Pacific island. Looking for shelter, they are grateful when they meet "Ma" and "Pa" and their children – an bizarre family still living in the backwoods as if it's still the 1920s. »

- Derek Anderson

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Shia Labeouf Not Involved with Indiana Jones 5

5 September 2017 1:11 PM, PDT | Age of the Nerd | See recent Age of the Nerd news »

Just like as quickly as Indy snatches the hat away from Shia Labeouf at the end of Kingdom of the Crystal Skull, Indiana Jones 5 writer David Koepp snatches Lebeouf’s character, Mutt, from the sequel. And that’s probably a good thing.

David Koepp confirmed that Harrison Ford will reprise his role as Indiana Jones and that “the Shia Labeouf character is not in the film.” Koepp even went on to say:

“We’re plugging away at it. In terms of when we would start, I think that’s up to Mr. Spielberg and Mr. Ford,” he continues, playfully teasing that the plot will involve “some precious artifact that they’re all looking for” throughout the film. “I know we’ve got a script we’re mostly happy with. Work will be endless, of course, and ongoing, and Steven just finished shooting The Post …. If the stars align, hopefully »

- Chris Salce

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