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Jan Triska, Star of ‘Ronin’ and ‘Ragtime,’ Dies at 80 After Fall From Bridge in Czech Republic

  • The Wrap
Jan Triska, Star of ‘Ronin’ and ‘Ragtime,’ Dies at 80 After Fall From Bridge in Czech Republic
Jan Triska, a Czech actor who starred in such Hollywood movies as “Ronin” and “Ragtime,” has died after a fall on Saturday from Prague’s iconic Charles Bridge. He was 80 years old. According to the Associated Press, Prague theater director Jan Hrusinsky confirmed the death on Monday. The actor died in Prague’s military hospital overnight from his injuries after Saturday’s fall. The circumstances of the fall are still unclear. Triska moved to the United States in 1977 after he signed a human rights manifesto against Czechoslovakia’s then-Communist government, according to The Guardian. He had been inspired by his close friend,
See full article at The Wrap »

Mary Goldberg, Casting Director of ‘Amadeus’ and ‘Alien,’ Dies at 72

Mary Goldberg, Casting Director of ‘Amadeus’ and ‘Alien,’ Dies at 72
Mary Goldberg, casting director of films including “Amadeus” and “Alien,” died Sept. 7 at her home in Ojai, Calif., following a short battle with lung cancer. She was 72.

Goldberg’s career spanned the New York theater community and the West Coast film industry, but she is best known for casting talent. She began her career in the early 1970s as an assistant to Bernard Gersten, the Public Theater’s associate producer, and became the Shakespeare Festival’s head of casting for both the Public Theater in downtown New York and the Delacorte Theater in Central Park in 1973. There, Goldberg assembled the casts of plays including “Two Gentlemen of Verona” starring Raul Julia, “King Lear” starring James Earl Jones, and “Much Ado About Nothing” starring Sam Waterston and Kathleen Widdoes.

From 1973 until 1975, Goldberg was also casting director for the Lincoln Center Repertory Company, managed by the New York Shakespeare Festival under Joseph Papp’s direction. At
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Mary Goldberg, Casting Director of ‘Amadeus’ and ‘Alien,’ Dies at 72

Mary Goldberg, Casting Director of ‘Amadeus’ and ‘Alien,’ Dies at 72
Mary Goldberg, casting director of films including “Amadeus” and “Alien,” died Sept. 7 at her home in Ojai, Calif., following a short battle with lung cancer. She was 72.

Goldberg’s career spanned the New York theater community and the West Coast film industry, but she is best known for casting talent. She began her career in the early 1970s as an assistant to Bernard Gersten, the Public Theater’s associate producer, and became the Shakespeare Festival’s head of casting for both the Public Theater in downtown New York and the Delacorte Theater in Central Park in 1973. There, Goldberg assembled the casts of plays including “Two Gentlemen of Verona” starring Raul Julia, “King Lear” starring James Earl Jones, and “Much Ado About Nothing” starring Sam Waterston and Kathleen Widdoes.

From 1973 until 1975, Goldberg was also casting director for the Lincoln Center Repertory Company, managed by the New York Shakespeare Festival under Joseph Papp’s direction. At
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Mary Goldberg Dies: Veteran Casting Director For ‘Amadeus’, ‘Rhoda’ Was 72

Mary Goldberg, whose formidable casting career ranged from New York theater to TV series such as Rhoda and Phyllis, and feature film including Milos Forman’s Oscar-winning Amadeus and Ragtime among many others, has died. Goldberg died September 7 after a short battle with lung cancer at her home in Ojai, California. She was 72. Goldberg’s decades-long entertainment industry career began in the 1970s in the New York theater community, first as an assistant to the New York…
See full article at Deadline TV »

Mary Goldberg, Casting Director on 'Amadeus' and 'Alien,' Dies at 72

Mary Goldberg, an award-winning casting director who collaborated on plays with Joseph Papp and on films with Milos Forman, Ridley Scott and Mike Nichols, has died. She was 72.

Goldberg died Thursday at her home in Ojai, Calif., after a short battle with lung cancer, publicist Tamara Trione announced.

In 1985, the Casting Society of America presented Goldberg with an award for outstanding feature film casting at the inaugural Artios Awards ceremony for her work on Forman's Amadeus (1984), winner of eight Academy Awards, including best picture. She earlier teamed with Forman on Ragtime (1981), James Cagney's final movie.

Goldberg...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - TV News »

Mary Goldberg, Casting Director on 'Amadeus' and 'Alien,' Dies at 72

Mary Goldberg, Casting Director on 'Amadeus' and 'Alien,' Dies at 72
Mary Goldberg, an award-winning casting director who collaborated on plays with Joseph Papp and on films with Milos Forman, Ridley Scott and Mike Nichols, has died. She was 72.

Goldberg died Thursday at her home in Ojai, Calif., after a short battle with lung cancer, publicist Tamara Trione announced.

In 1985, the Casting Society of America presented Goldberg with an award for outstanding feature film casting at the inaugural Artios Awards ceremony for her work on Forman's Amadeus (1984), winner of eight Academy Awards, including best picture. She earlier teamed with Forman on Ragtime (1981), James Cagney's final movie.

Goldberg...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

The People Review: O.J.: Made in America - The Epic Tale of a Superstar's Racially Charged Rise and Fall

  • PEOPLE.com
The People Review: O.J.: Made in America - The Epic Tale of a Superstar's Racially Charged Rise and Fall
It wasn't even six months ago that Ryan Murphy dramatized the Trial of the Century with FX's scintillating The People v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story. Espn's 10-hour, five-night O.J.: Made in America is just as extraordinary - if Story was one socko chapter in an important narrative, this documentary is the book, unabridged. Made in America covers the whole O.J. Simpson spectrum, starting with a history of L.A. race relations and ending with the onetime football star a felon, convicted of armed robbery and kidnapping, and moldering in prison. "Deep in my heart, I done what I
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Golden Globes: 25 Things You Didn't Know About the Awards Ceremony

  • Moviefone
For a night known as Hollywood's most notorious open-bar gala, the Golden Globes ceremony remains shrouded in mystery.

Most viewers probably don't even know who presents it (the Hollywood Foreign Press Association), how many voting members it has (only about 90), or what qualifies them to pass judgment on movies and television. Yet movie fans and awards mavens continue to take the Globes seriously as a precursor to the Academy Awards, since some of the Globe honorees will indeed go on to win Oscars. With Ricky Gervais set to reprise his hosting duties this weekend, here are 25 things you need to know about the Globes.

1. Founded in October 1943 by eight foreign-market journalists, the Hollywood Foreign Press Association (then called the Hollywood Foreign Correspondents Association) held its first awards ceremony the following spring, as a luncheon at 20th Century Fox. Instead of trophies, the winners took home scrolls.

2. The next year, the
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The Fireman’s Ball

Milos Forman was the prince of the Prague Spring with this Czech New Wave classic, a hilarious black comedy about the cheerful corruption and incompetence of petty bureaucrats. A fire brigade throws a bash, and by the end of the evening the lottery prizes are all stolen and the beauty contest has become a travesty. And they can't even put out a simple fire. The joke is clearly aimed at the Communist government. The Fireman's Ball Region-Free Blu-ray + Pal DVD Arrow Academy (UK) 1967 / Color / / 71 min. / Horí, má panenko / Street Date October 12, 2015 / Available from Amazon UK £14.99 Cinematography Miroslav Ondrícek Production Designer Karel Cerny Film Editor Miroslav Hájek Original Music Karel Mares Writing credits Milos Forman, Jaroslav Papousek, Ivan Passer and Václav Sasek Produced by Rudolf Hajek, Carlo Ponti Directed by Milos Forman

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

We know Milos Forman from his American pictures Hair and Ragtime, but he made big
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Largely Forgotten, Frequent Cagney Partner Remembered on TCM

Pat O'Brien movies on TCM: 'The Front Page,' 'Oil for the Lamps of China' Remember Pat O'Brien? In case you don't, you're not alone despite the fact that O'Brien was featured – in both large and small roles – in about 100 films, from the dawn of the sound era to 1981. That in addition to nearly 50 television appearances, from the early '50s to the early '80s. Never a top star or a critics' favorite, O'Brien was nevertheless one of the busiest Hollywood leading men – and second leads – of the 1930s. In that decade alone, mostly at Warner Bros., he was seen in nearly 60 films, from Bs (Hell's House, The Final Edition) to classics (American Madness, Angels with Dirty Faces). Turner Classic Movies is showing nine of those today, Nov. 11, '15, in honor of what would have been the Milwaukee-born O'Brien's 116th birthday. Pat O'Brien and James Cagney Spencer Tracy had Katharine Hepburn.
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

‘Amadeus’ Production Designer Tapped for Art Directors Guild’s Lifetime Achievement Award

‘Amadeus’ Production Designer Tapped for Art Directors Guild’s Lifetime Achievement Award
Patrizia von Brandenstein will receive the Art Directors Guild’s Lifetime Achievement Award.

She was the first woman to win an Academy Award for production design, for “Amadeus,” and was also nominated for Oscars in the category for “Ragtime” and “The Untouchables.”

The award will be presented at the 20th Annual Excellence in Production Design Awards on Jan. 31 at the Beverly Hilton.

Von Brandenstein began her film career in 1972 as a set decorator on “The Candidate” and subsequently worked as a costume designer on “Between the Lines” and “Saturday Night Fever.” She teamed with her husband and fellow production designer, Stuart Wurtzel, on “Hester Street” and moved into art direction for “Breaking Away” and “Ragtime.”

She collaborated with Mike Nichols on “Silkwood,” “Working Girl” and “Postcards From the Edge.” Her additional production credits include “A Chorus Line,” “Billy Bathgate,” “Leap of Faith,” “A Simple Plan,” “Shaft,” “The Last Station” and “Albert Nobbs.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Top Screenwriting Team from the Golden Age of Hollywood: List of Movies and Academy Award nominations

Billy Wilder directed Sunset Blvd. with Gloria Swanson and William Holden. Billy Wilder and Charles Brackett movies Below is a list of movies on which Charles Brackett and Billy Wilder worked together as screenwriters, including efforts for which they did not receive screen credit. The Wilder-Brackett screenwriting partnership lasted from 1938 to 1949. During that time, they shared two Academy Awards for their work on The Lost Weekend (1945) and, with D.M. Marshman Jr., Sunset Blvd. (1950). More detailed information further below. Post-split years Billy Wilder would later join forces with screenwriter I.A.L. Diamond in movies such as the classic comedy Some Like It Hot (1959), the Best Picture Oscar winner The Apartment (1960), and One Two Three (1961), notable as James Cagney's last film (until a brief comeback in Milos Forman's Ragtime two decades later). Although some of these movies were quite well received, Wilder's later efforts – which also included The Seven Year Itch
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

E.L. Doctorow, Esteemed American Novelist, Dies At 84

Novelist E.L. Doctorow, who penned Ragtime and Billy Bathgate, died Tuesday. He was 84. E.L. Doctorow Dies Doctorow’s son confirmed his death from complications of lung cancer to The New York Times. Doctorow’s books gave glimpses into corners of the American story, from the cities to the countryside. He interwove significant historical figures such as […]

The post E.L. Doctorow, Esteemed American Novelist, Dies At 84 appeared first on uInterview.
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E.L. Doctorow Dies: ‘Ragtime’ Author Specialized In Historical Fiction

E.L. Doctorow Dies: ‘Ragtime’ Author Specialized In Historical Fiction
E.L. Doctorow, author of critically acclaimed historic fiction including the sprawling novels Ragtime and Billy Bathgate, has died. Doctorow was 84 and died of complications from lung cancer, his son Richard told the New York Times, which first reported the author’s passing. In addition to a dozen novels, Doctorow also published multiple volumes of short stories, essays and the stage drama Drinks Before Dinner. Ragtime was made into a feature film released in 1981…
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E.L. Doctorow, Author of ‘Ragtime,’ ‘Billy Bathgate,’ Dies at 84

E.L. Doctorow, Author of ‘Ragtime,’ ‘Billy Bathgate,’ Dies at 84
E.L. Doctorow, the author of historical fiction whose writing were adapted into feature films including “Billy Bathgate,” “Daniel” and “Ragtime,” has died. He was 84.

The Bronx native died on Tuesday in Manhattan. The cause of death was complications due to lung cancer, his son, Richard, told the New York Times.

Doctorow penned a dozen novels published over the course of five decades between 1960 and 2014. Perhaps his most influential work, “Ragtime” was adapted for the screen in 1981 and again as a staged musical in 1998. In 1997, shortly before the musical opened, Doctorow told Variety that he much preferred the staged version, which he said “caught the spirit” of his writing, whereas the 1981 film “misread my text.”

Still, Variety critic Stephen Klain praised Doctorow in his 1981 review of the film, writing “The page-turning joys of E.L. Doctorow’s bestselling ‘Ragtime,’ which dizzily and entertainingly charted a kaleidoscopic vision of a turn-of-century America in
See full article at Variety - Film News »

E.L. Doctorow, Author of Ragtime and Writer of Historical Fiction, Has Died

  • Vulture
E.L. Doctorow, Author of Ragtime and Writer of Historical Fiction, Has Died
E.L. Doctorow, the award-winning New York author who was renowned for his historical fiction and penned such unique works as Ragtime, Billy Bathgate, City of God, and The Waterworks, died Tuesday in Manhattan. The New York Times reports the cause was "complications from lung cancer." He was 84. Doctorow, often looked at as one of the doyens of historical fiction, wrote 12 novels as well as a handful of short-story collections and a play. Several of his books were adapted as big-screen projects, including Welcome to Hard Times, Billy Bathgate, and Ragtime — the last of which also saw the stage and garnered four Tonys. His most recent release was last year's Andrew's Brain. He also occasionally wrote for such publications as The New York Review of Books, The Nation, the New York Times, and New York (some of those writings are available, archived here). When he recalled his Bronx
See full article at Vulture »

E.L. Doctorow, Historical Fiction Author, Dies at 84

E.L. Doctorow, Historical Fiction Author, Dies at 84
Ragtime author E.L. Doctorow has died in New York. He was 84. His son, Richard Doctorow, confirms he died Tuesday at a New York hospital from complications of lung cancer. Doctorow reimagined the American past and applied its lessons to the present and future. He was best known for Ragtime, his panoramic novel of the turn of the 20th century. Published in 1975, it was later made into a film featuring James Cagney and a Broadway musical. Doctorow also was known for such novels as World's Fair, Billy Bathgate and The March. Besides to his 10 novels, he published two books of short stories, a

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See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

From Independent Films to Broadway - An Indie Producer Takes to the Stage

Independent film producer and CEO of Branded Pictures Entertainment J. Todd Harris ("The Kids Are All Right," "Bottle Shock") has been feeling an easterly pull back to his theatre roots over the past year. Having started in the theatre right out of college running the repertory company TheatreWorks in Palo Alto, the producer of nearly 40 films, is now producing the stage musical adaptation of Doctor Zhivago based on the Nobel Prize-winning Boris Pasternak’s novel, which also served as the basis for the 1965 Academy Award-winning David Lean film starring Omar Sharif and Julie Christie (and Rod Steiger, Geraldine Chaplin and Tom Courtenay). I had chance to catch up with this bi-coastal whirlwind last week after he returned from the show’s opening on Broadway.

Peter Belsito : Isn’t independent film hard enough? What got you interested in Broadway?

J. Todd Harris : (laughing). I didn’t think anything could be harder than independent films, but I was wrong. The fact is my wife Amy Powers is a co-lyricist on the show and has been working on it for over a decade after its first try-out at the La Jolla Playhouse in 2005. Four years ago, we moved to Australia for our way “out of town” run and I felt I could help raise a bit of money, so I was an associate producer. When word came in last year that it was going to Broadway, I told them I thought I could raise a million dollars and serve as one of the producers.

Pb : Did you raise your share? And how does it compare to raising money for a film?

Jth : I did, and then some, from about thirty individual investors. In that sense, it’s not unlike a lot of independent films that are financed with equity. It’s a different eco-system, but the concept is pretty similar. And, just like a lot of independent films, you don’t make money up front! It’s all about ownership, so you really hope the show breaks even soon. The authors – book, lyrics, composer – all get a royalty off the top. No nonsense like the movie business. This contributes to my love for my wife.

Pb : What is the show’s budget, if I may ask?

Jth : About 15M, it’s a Big Broadway show. There are well over one hundred investors and probably 30 credited producers. When A Gentleman’s Guide to Murder won the Tony Award last year, I thought the stage was going to collapse so many producers went up to collect the award. But, you know, it takes a village. Sometimes a small city. It’s okay to reward and acknowledge the backers of a show. It’s a huge risk and without these backers we’d be a poorer culture. They’re like modern day patrons. Why not give them a moment in the sun?

Pb : How did you get the rights to Doctor Zhivago? Such a big title!

Jth : I cannot take credit for that. Composer Lucy Simon (The Secret Garden) originally got the rights well over ten years ago and started working with a creative team, but before the La Jolla production the team changed and that’s when my wife was recruited to co-write the lyrics with Michael Korie ( Grey Gardens) and joined the team that included book writer Michael Weller (Loose Ends, screenplays for Hair and Ragtime ) and director Des McAnuff (Jersey Boys). Des was artistic director of La Jolla Playhouse at the time. And the show’s lead producer Anita Waxman was involved very early on providing the seed capital for La Jolla and then putting the financing together for Australia and now Broadway.

Pb : That’s a long gestation period, even compared to Hollywood, isn’t it?

Jth : It is one of the longer ones, but these things can literally take years as creative teams gel, script and music mesh, and planets align for talent, money and – not least importantly – a theatre. The strange alchemy that gets a Broadway show a greenlight isn’t all that different than the weird science of getting a big Hollywood movie off the ground.

Pb : Sounds like a lot of cooks in the kitchen.

Jth : There are, but from a producing angle, there’s usually a small group of lead producers who make the major financial decisions and every creative team finds its own rhythm. Writers and composers are accorded a lot more respect in theatre; that’s the major difference from movies.

Pb : Are you happy with how the show has come out?

Jth : Thrilled. Of course, it’s hard to claim crystal clear perspective when one is as emotionally invested in the show as I am in Doctor Zhivago, but I think the creative team has taken an epic story and distilled it to its emotional and political core. Lucy Simon has written melodies that will live forever in the musical theatre firmament. Des has done a masterful job of staging a huge and complex show. Ambition doesn’t begin to describe it. We got mixed reviews, but so did Phantom, Cats and Wicked. The final arbiter is audiences, and the dozen or so times I’ve seen the show at the Broadway Theatre, there have been copious cheers and tears.

Pb : You also did a show last year?

Jth : Yes, I was part of the producing team that developed and produced Heathers The Musical, based on the Daniel Waters script directed by Michael Lehmann back in 1988. It was a great experience working with a very tight creative and producing team. Andy Fickman directed a script, book and music by Kevin Murphy and Larry O’Keefe. It ran off Broadway for about 5 months and we hope we can adapt that to the screen and go back to Broadway.

Pb : Do you find a lot of talent crossing over from Hollywood to Broadway?

Jth : More and more, that is the case. Not just writers, directors and actors, but also material. Broadway is flooded with adaptations of movies – Aladdin is running strong, Honeymoon In Vegas recently closed, and last year Bridges of Madison County and Big Fish had nice runs on Broadways as musicals. I definitely have my eye on other fare to crossover from screen to stage.

Pb : Can you tell us what you’re working on?

Jth : Not yet, but some very recognizable titles that I think are ideal for the Great White Way.
See full article at Sydney's Buzz »

Miroslav Ondricek, Oscar-Nominated Cinematographer, Dies at 80

Miroslav Ondricek, Oscar-Nominated Cinematographer, Dies at 80
Miroslav Ondricek, the Czech director of photography who earned two Academy Award nominations, has died. He was 80. Czech public television announced Ondricek's death Sunday, citing his son David, also a filmmaker. No cause was given. Ondricek was behind the camera in some 40 movies but was best known abroad for his collaborations with his friend, director Milos Forman, who settled in the United States after the 1968 Soviet-led invasion crushed the Prague Spring's liberal reforms in Czechoslovakia. Read More Hollywood's Notable Deaths of 2015 His work on Forman's Ragtime and Amadeus, which examined the relationship between Mozart and rival composer Antonio Salieri,

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See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Miroslav Ondricek, Oscar-Nominated Czech Cinematographer, Dies at 80

Miroslav Ondricek, Oscar-Nominated Czech Cinematographer, Dies at 80
Miroslav Ondricek, a Czech cinematographer who worked frequently with director Milos Forman and was nominated twice for Academy Awards, has died, according to several reports. He was 80.

Ondricek’s son David, who is also a filmmaker, announced the death to Czech television, though no cause was given.

Ondricek worked on more than 40 films in his career, about a dozen of which were shot in the U.S. He is perhaps best known for his work with friend Forman.

The two worked together on “Ragtime” and “Amadeus,” both garnering Oscar nominations for Ondricek for his cinematography. Ondricek won a BAFTA in 1984 for “Amadeus.” Ondricek and Forman, who currently lives in New York, also worked together on “Fireman’s Ball” early in Forman’s career and “Hair.”

Ondricek stayed busy throughout the ’90s, working with U.S. director Penny Marshall on 1990’s “Awakenings,” starring Robert De Niro and Robin Williams, and 1992 comedy “A League of Their Own,
See full article at Variety - Film News »
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