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Remembering National Society of Film Critics Award-Winning Brazilian Superstar Pêra

Marília Pêra: Actress starred in Brazilian movie classic 'Pixote.' Marília Pêra: Brazilian film, TV and stage star Remembering Brazilian stage, television, and film star Marília Pêra, whose acting and singing career spanned more than five decades. Pêra died of lung cancer on Dec. 5, '15, in Rio de Janeiro. Born Marília Soares Pêra on Jan. 22, 1943, in Rio, she was 72 years old. 'Pixote' prostitute Internationally, Marília Pêra is best known as the loud, vulgar prostitute Sueli, who becomes acquainted with São Paulo street kid Fernando Ramos da Silva in Hector Babenco's well-received social drama Pixote / Pixote: A Lei do Mais Fraco (1981),[1] a fierce indictment of Brazilian society's utter disregard for its disadvantaged members. In one pivotal – and widely talked about scene – she lets the titular character (da Silva, at the time 12 years old)[2] suckle her breast. In another, she pulls down her panties and sits in
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

National Society of Film Critics Award-Winning Brazilian Superstar Dead at 72

Marília Pêra: Actress starred in Brazilian movie classic 'Pixote.' Marília Pêra: Brazilian star and National Board of Review Best Actress winner dead at 72 This article is being revised and expanded. Please check back later. Actress Marília Pêra, a top Brazilian stage, television, and film star whose acting and singing career spanned more than five decades, died of lung cancer on Dec. 5, '15, in Rio de Janeiro. Pêra (born on Jan. 22, 1943, in Rio de Janeiro) was 72 years old. 'Pixote' prostitute Internationally, Marília Pêra is best known as the loud, vulgar prostitute who becomes acquainted with São Paulo street kid Fernando Ramos da Silva – who suckles her breast in one pivotal scene – in Hector Babenco's well-regarded social drama Pixote, a fierce indictment of Brazilian society's utter disregard for its disadvantaged citizens. Although Pêra's screen time is relatively brief, she made enough of an impact to be
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

A Pigeon Sat on a Branch Reflecting on Existence Movie Review

  • ShockYa
A Pigeon Sat on a Branch Reflecting on Existence Movie Review
A Pigeon Sat On A Branch Reflecting On Existence Magnolia Pictures Reviewed by: Harvey Karten for Shockya. Databased on Rotten Tomatoes. Grade: C+ Director: Roy Andersson Screenwriter: Roy Andersson Cast: Holger Andersson, Nila Westblom, Charlotta Larsson, Viktor Gyllenberg, Lotti Tornros, Jonas Gerholdm, Ola Stensson, Oscar Salaomonsson, Roger Olsen Likvern Screened at: Review 2, NYC, 4/22/15 Opens: June 3, 2015 A guy sees his friend writhing on the ground with a spear implanted in his stomach. “Are you Ok?” the guy queries using that hoary cliché so prominent in the movies and on TV. “It hurts only when I laugh,” the friend responds. As absurdist as the answer sounds, there is [ Read More ]

The post A Pigeon Sat on a Branch Reflecting on Existence Movie Review appeared first on Shockya.com.
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Q&A: Paul Merton

'What is the worst thing anyone's ever said to me? Are you Ian Hislop?'

Born in Fulham, Merton, 57, made his standup debut at London's Comedy Store in 1982. He has been a regular on Radio 4's Just A Minute since 1989, and on Have I Got News For You since 1990. His new autobiography is called Only When I Laugh.

What is your greatest fear?

Heights: I am not very comfortable being six foot two.

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

86th Academy Awards: Streep Shatters Nominations Record

Meryl Streep breaks Oscar record: Oscar 2014 nominations (photo: Meryl Streep in ‘August: Osage County’) The 2014 Oscar nominations were announced earlier today at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences’ Samuel Goldwyn Theater in Beverly Hills. Academy president Cheryl Boone Isaacs and Thor: The Dark World and Snow White and the Huntsman actor Chris Hemsworth — whose Rush was completely shut out — made the announcements, including that of Best Actress contender Meryl Streep, in the running for her performance in John WellsAugust: Osage County. Streep’s competitors are her Doubt and Julie & Julia co-star Amy Adams for David O. Russell’s American Hustle, Sandra Bullock for Alfonso Cuarón’s Gravity, Judi Dench for Stephen FrearsPhilomena, and likely winner Cate Blanchett for Woody Allen’s Blue Jasmine. (Emma Thompson’s absence from the Best Actress roster — for her performance in John Lee Hancock’s Saving Mr. Banks — was quite a surprise.
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

And The Oscar Goes To ... Someone Who Didn't Deserve It.

  • The Backlot
It still provides a chuckle

The history of The Academy Awards is littered with strange and inexplicable happenings: Revealed shortcomings, spontaneous pushups, "The winner is Paul Newman," Sandahl Bergman's interpretive dance to "Eye Of The Tiger" (admittedly, one of the highlights of my life).

And of course ... Snow White rolling on the river.

But aside from the odd ceremony moments, and the fashion drama on the red carpet, it's the Oscar errors in judgment that we remember the most.

A few weeks ago we discussed the Oscar nomination Sins Of Omission, so let's now take a look at the performers who actually won, and how The Academy still blew it.

The 2005 nominees for Best Actor were:

Philip Seymour Hoffman in Capote

Heath Ledger in Brokeback Mountain

David Strathairn in Good Night and Good Luck

Terrence Howard in Hustle & Flow

Joaquin Phoenix in Walk The Line

And The Oscar Went
See full article at The Backlot »

Sins of Omission: 13 Past Performances The Academy Should Have Nominated

  • The Backlot
They have a right to be pissed.

It's the most important morning of the year. Hollywood is temporarily jolted from its stupor for a ten-minute rollercoaster of natural highs and shattered dreams. Nothing but ... shattered dreams.

It's those shattered dreams that immediately become the focus after the Oscar nominations are announced. With only five slots per category, deserving actors are excluded, and that's when the fun begins, as the discussion about the "snubs" commences.

That was especially true this year, as a flurry of serious contenders were nowhere to be found. Charlize Theron, Tilda Swinton, Leonardo Dicaprio, and Albert Brooks were the names most bandied about, along with Andy Serkis (and they should really either nominate him, or give him a special Oscar for his unique contributions to film.)

Of course, Oscar has a history of overlooking interesting and memorable performances. Let's take a look at a few notable Oscar omissions.
See full article at The Backlot »

The depiction of the NHS on TV shows how much we love it | Marcus Prince

From the stuffed shirts of Doctor in the House to the anarchic humour of Green Wing, television continues to explore the bond between the NHS and the public, writes Marcus Prince

As this government is rapidly finding out, you mess with the NHS at your peril. As British as fish and chips, television producers have long been wise to exploiting the special place this institution holds in the affections of the nation. Was this perhaps why when ITV brought us Harley Street (2008), a series set among the high flyers of private medicine, the British public gave it the thumbs down. Doomed to fail precisely because it could not exploit the goodwill we extend to the NHS and the good doctors, nurses and surgeons who work within its ranks. To generations of the viewing public brought up on Casualty, practising medicine for profit was simply anathema.

Television was very quick to
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

The top 10 Oscars books | Peter Bradshaw

From red-carpet thrillers to insider accounts, the Guardian's film critic hands out his gongs to the best Oscars literature out there

Partly because Academy Award madness is almost upon us, partly because like all former PhD students I love a good reading list, and partly out of sheer nerdiness, I have compiled an arbitrary list of the top 10 Oscar-related books. This has involved the incidental pleasure of hanging out in the Humanities One reading room of the British Library, and also in the library of the excellent and under-appreciated Cinema Museum in Kennington, south London.

1) Robert Osborne – 80 Years of the Oscar: The Official History of the Academy Awards (2009)

A hefty, celebratory, coffee-table slab of a book, packed with stats and pictures like a book about sport. Very much the approved, authorised version.

2) Mason Wiley and Damien Bona – Inside Oscar: The Unofficial History of the Academy Awards (1977)

Notionally "unofficial" but in
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Contest: Turner Classic Movies Oscars Giveaway

  • BuzzFocus.com
Calling all movie fanatics, we have a great giveaway for you. How many of you knew that Turner Classic Movie's 31 Days of Oscar festival is in full swing! It started on February 1st and is running until the end of the month, featuring 360 Academy Award-nominated and winning movies, all uncut and commercial-free. This year the films are scheduled in a format inspired by the ever-popular Six Degrees of Kevin Bacon game - starting with Only When I Laugh and ending with Diner. Check out the full schedule in the widget below or at [link] . Host Robert Osborne is twittering throughout the month at twitter.com/tcm These films are sure to get you in the mood for the 82nd Academy Awards on March 7th, 2010! Check out the nifty schedule over at TCM.com by clicking on the image below. Now for our giveaway, we have neat Oscar Party
See full article at BuzzFocus.com »

Turner Classic Movies' Annual 31 Days Of Oscar, the full schedule

TCM's annual roundup of the best of film will be presented in February/March 2010. This month-long event will feature 360 Academy Award-nominated and winning movies, all presented uncut and commercial-free. The twist this year is that each movie is linked to the next movie in the lineup through a shared actor or actress. The event began Monday, Feb. 1, with Kevin Bacon and James Coco in Only When I Laugh (1981). Coco and Harry Andrews will then be featured in The Man of La Mancha (1972) at 8:15 a.m., followed by Andrews in 55 Days at Peking (1963) at 10:30 a.m. The 2010 edition will feature 22 films making their debut on TCM, including Gladiator (2000),
See full article at Monsters and Critics »

Mark Kermode: It's only a movie | extract

The great iconoclastic film-maker Werner Herzog is used to shooting films – but being shot at? In this extract from his cinematic memoir Mark Kermode tells the remarkable story of how, in the middle of interviewing the German director on a hilltop in Los Angeles, he gets shot. And refuses to go to hospital. And there's the day he meets Angelina... and other stories from a life obsessed with films…

We were somewhere near Lookout Mountain, on the outskirts of La, when Werner Herzog's trousers exploded. It was a small explosion, admittedly, as if a firecracker had gone off in his pocket. But it was an explosion none the less and in an area where unexpected bangs are to be treated with suspicion, if not outright alarm. Herzog had been shot – that much was clear – and was even now bleeding quietly into his boxer shorts as a tiny plume of
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Big Top: the first sitcom that manages to be less funny than its situation?

We've had shops, police stations, hospitals, newsrooms, prisons and offices – what about a circus sitcom? On BBC1. Starring Amanda Holden. What could possibly go wrong?

Tonight, BBC One unveils its big new circus-based sitcom Big Top, starring, among others, Tony Robinson and John Thomson. I think it could actually make history – as the first sitcom ever that makes its situation seem markedly less funny than it actually is in real life.

Prison isn't generally known for its hilarity, so it was easy for Porridge to be funnier than the situation it was based on. Being a member of the French resistance during the second world war wasn't especially jolly either, so it wasn't hard for 'Allo 'Allo! to out-funny that. A basement bar surrounded by habitual alcoholics who all suffer from varying levels of self-loathing? Depressing. And yet Cheers is one of the most-loved sitcoms ever. But here's the problem
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

The Run-up To The Razzies

  • CinemaRetro
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Cinema Retro columnist David Savage takes a look at Hollywood's most dubious career achievement.

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Elizabeth Berkley in Showgirls: the film that inspired Whoopi Goldberg to say she hadn't seen this many poles abused since WWII.

In the run-up to this year’s Razzie nominations, to be announced Wednesday, January 21st for 2008’s “honorees” for the worst achievements in moviemaking, the longlist buzz is already getting press. If it’s any indication, 2008 must have been a stink-bomb banner year for movies as it’s rare for the press to report on the worst movies of the year just-passed, before the nominations are even announced.

Among the films emerging as leading contenders for 2008’s gold-plated raspberry statuette -- always bestowed on the eve of the “other” gold-plated statuette ceremony -- are: The Love Guru, Mike Myers’ laughless Bollywood debacle; Speed Racer, Disaster Movie,
See full article at CinemaRetro »

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