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Montenegro (1981)

6.9
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Ratings: 6.9/10 from 1,394 users  
Reviews: 21 user | 14 critic

A bored wealthy housewife on the verge of insanity cuts loose with some lively Yugoslavian immigrants who delight in their bohemian lifestyle.

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Title: Montenegro (1981)

Montenegro (1981) on IMDb 6.9/10

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Susan Anspach ...
Marilyn Jordan
...
Martin Jordan
Marianne Jacobi ...
Cookie Jordan (as Marianna Jacobi)
...
Jimmy Jordan (as Jamie Marsh)
John Zacharias ...
Grandpa Bill
Per Oscarsson ...
Dr. Aram Pazardjian
Marina Lindahl ...
Secretary
Bora Todorovic ...
Alex Rossignol
Lisbeth Zachrisson ...
Rita Rossignol
Svetozar Cvetkovic ...
Montenegro
Patricia Gélin ...
Tirke
Dragan Ilic ...
Hassan
Nikola Janic ...
Mustapha
Mile Petrovic ...
Zanzi Bar Customer
John Parkinson ...
Piano Player
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Storyline

Marilyn Jordan is a bored housewife in Sweden who is liberated (sexually and otherwise) by her relationship with a group of gregarious Yugoslavs. Based on a true story. Written by Stewart M. Clamen <clamen@cs.cmu.edu>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Or Pigs and Pearls See more »

Genres:

Drama | Comedy

Certificate:

R | See all certifications »
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Details

Country:

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Language:

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Release Date:

9 October 1981 (Sweden)  »

Also Known As:

Montenegro  »

Box Office

Gross:

SEK 1,950,055 (Sweden)
 »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

(Eastmancolor)
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Did You Know?

Trivia

On its original USA release, this film was cut by seconds to avoid receiving an "X" rating from the MPAA. This "R"-rated version was also soon seen on home video and premium cable in that country, but in more recent years the uncensored original has turned up on both as "unrated." See more »

Quotes

Grandpa Bill: They feed these monkeys oranges and bananas! Why don't you treat me like that?
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Connections

Featured in Seriously Funny: An Argument for Comedy (1996) See more »

Soundtracks

"Why Did It Have To Be Me'
Written by Benny Andersson (uncredited), Stig Anderson (uncredited) and Björn Ulvaeus (uncredited)
Performed by ABBA
Courtesy of Polar Music International
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User Reviews

The Madness of Civility Seeks Grounding in the Primal
21 October 2002 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

Others who have commented on 'Montenegro' seem to miss the film's point. Yes, it is a black comedy; no, it's not nihilistic. The characters do not behave in incomprehensible ways - they behave in ways alien to our Western acculturation & our snobby "everybody must do nice-nice to each other" civility. 'Montenegro' takes effete, overbaked, hypersophisticated, irrelevant Western sensibilities & turns them smack on their pointed little heads.

American Marliyn Jordan (Susan Anspach in a tour de force performance) lives in Sweden with her Swedish husband. Marilyn is not, as other commentators have misapprehended, a bored, psychotic housewife - she's a woman who, in her overbaked Western milieu of mind-blenching affluence, oversensitive men & women, diplomatic euphemism, & arcane, costly, "necessary", psychobabble (brilliantly depicted, & sent up, in the analysis scene), has lost touch with all that's primal, urgent, & vital in herself.

Already whacked out from living in her gilded, padded, safe-till-she's-numbed life, Jordan impulsively hooks up with a completely primal, totally up front & no bones about it, caveman & club bunch of howling, lusty Montenegrans. Once she's with them things happen very differently from the way they failed to happen in her previous ersatz saccharine-junkie life.

Jordan is in for keeps with people who play for keeps. Lust, blood, sex, ooze, vendettas, vengeance - all the primal, classical, down-deep-in-human-nature emotions & their instantaneous acting-out - are how things are for Jordan now in Montenegro. The suddenness, violence, & clarity of emotion & action repulses us because we're so used to warning labels on everything from cigarette lighters & child safety seats, & from self-esteem minuets in schools to language prohibitions in our workplaces. All that's out the window in 'Montenegro' with Marilyn Jordan fast losing her melancholia & madness, & rushing headlong into shameless, unbridled lust, man-baiting, cat-fighting, & knock-down (with that caveman club!) & drag out sex.

Watching 'Montenegro' we Westerners are intrigued, repelled, fascinated, revolted - but we can't turn away from the fluids & furze, the basal & nasal sensation, the genitals-out-in-the-winds-of-Fate abandon, & the cathartic, orgasmic, lethal, & vital primordial reckoning that is 'Montenegro' exploding on our retinae, in our ears, on our skin, in our nostrils, & in our wide-open mouths.

One wonders if Camille Paglia has seen 'Montenegro' because one expects she'd love it, because this film delves into things primal that Paglia's betes noires - radical gender feminist ideologues - reject and label "patriarchal violence against women" & "not women's way of knowing". Let's just say that 'Montenegro' isn't likely to be high on Gloria Steinem's, Patricia Ireland's, or Susan Sontag's list of all-time favorite films. That alone tells how worthy this film is of wide open embrace & enjoyment: 'Montenegro' doesn't cave or cop to salon intellectualism, pop psychology, Botox beauty, animal rights activist solipsism, or moral relativism. This is the real deal: down to brass tacks humanity stripped of culture & deodorant & Sani-Pure flush toilets & sparkling bidets & layers of insulation from the Real.

'Montenegro' isn't Greek Tragedy, it's not Shakespearian artistry, & it sure isn't Frank Capra or Spike Lee - it's pure primal, take no prisoners, heads-on-lances, bareass naked human nature turning back the clock & stripping away the veneer of Western propriety. It's an enrapturing, refreshing, uncensored look at the way we humans were...and still are. 'Monetenegro' gives us a pungent whiff of how we smell without deodorant, look without makeup, feel without politically correct "civilized" Thought Police cues, touch with unwashed hands, & taste blood-rare meat without first checking to be sure our side of veggies is certified to be "organic", washed, or attractively presented. Nobody calls for a cop in Montenegro, watches Oprah, or cares less what Dr. Phil advises; nobody hails a waiter without ducking for the dagger that will come hurtling his way; & nobody bats an eyelash without understanding up front that it means, "Come hither: Now!" In 'Montenegro' nobody trifles with food & wine & sex & death because they're the stuff of everyday life - life on the edge, life in the Now, into which Marliyn Jordan, body & soul, hurls herself.


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uncut 'harder' version ..?? bryntilly
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